Society & Culture Australia

Discussion in 'Question and Answer' started by worbod, May 5, 2012.

Put it out there
  1. worbod

    worbod Team Captain

    Western Bulldogs
    Other teams:
    Liverpool
    Joined:
    Oct 08
    Posts:
    1,726
    Location:
    Bendigo
    Who is considered or known to be the first person to arrive in or discover Australia? Is it William Dampier?

    (Log in to remove this ad.)

  2. tandino

    tandino All Australian

    Essendon
    Other teams:
    Joined:
    Mar 07
    Posts:
    6,469
    Location:
    Showers Stand
    A cool cat named Willem Janszoon.

    The first European, of course. But it's pretty obvious that's what you meant.
  3. The_Reaper

    The_Reaper BFSC Gold

    West Coast
    Other teams:
    East Fremantle
    Joined:
    Jan 06
    Posts:
    22,234
    Location:
    Perth
  4. Scotland

    Scotland Club Legend

    West Coast
    Other teams:
    Joined:
    May 06
    Posts:
    16,748
    Janszoon landed the Duyfken in what is now Qld 8 years earlier than Hartog landed the Eendracht in WA.
  5. worbod

    worbod Team Captain

    Western Bulldogs
    Other teams:
    Liverpool
    Joined:
    Oct 08
    Posts:
    1,726
    Location:
    Bendigo
    Thanks for this info about Janszoon. It would appear Hartog has the distinction of being the first person to land on the western coast of Australia, but having now read about these two chaps, I can see that Janszoon is the main man. This now gives me something solid to say to anyone who still thinks Captain Cook was the first guy to discover this place.
  6. DESTRUCTOR

    DESTRUCTOR Rookie

    Adelaide
    Other teams:
    Joined:
    Jun 11
    Posts:
    256
    Location:
    Omicron Persei 8
  7. strung_out7

    strung_out7 Team Captain

    Hawthorn
    Other teams:
    Joined:
    Feb 08
    Posts:
    275
    Location:
    perth
    There is actually an interesting story from the Batavia wreck on the abrohlos islands (WA). Although there is no proof, it is thought that 2 of the men punished for the bloodbath on the Abrohlos island were dropped off on the 'mainland'. And apparently when europeans first entered the region between Kalbarri and Carnarvon, they noticed the skin tone of the aboriginals was lighter than usual, meaning that these 2 may of survived and bred with the indigenous population
  8. kfc1

    kfc1 Club Legend

    Essendon
    Other teams:
    Joined:
    Oct 10
    Posts:
    5,569
    There is a really good novel called "Strange Objects" by Gary Crew which is based on the Batavia wreck and later discovery of artefacts. Whilst its a work of fiction, tis a bloody good read if you are interested in the history of it. I first read it as a kid and loved it - it's one of the few fiction books I actually keep re-reading.
  9. Nightrain

    Nightrain Senior List

    Sydney
    Other teams:
    Joined:
    Jun 10
    Posts:
    301
    There is a theory that the Chinese originally landed in Australia around the 11th or 12th century during an attempt to map the globe. A change in leadership and direction saw much of their knowledge and expansionism destroyed.
  10. korgmeister

    korgmeister Suspended

    Sydney
    Other teams:
    Joined:
    May 12
    Posts:
    28
    Location:
    sydney
    is this something like which race is more superior if knowing who discover australia first?
  11. DidakDelight

    DidakDelight Team Captain

    Collingwood
    Other teams:
    Queensland State of Origin
    Joined:
    Jun 08
    Posts:
    942
    Location:
    In amongst it all
    How far fetched is that?
    Surely they would have been butchered if they tried to sample the local cuisine?

    (Log in to remove this ad.)

  12. strung_out7

    strung_out7 Team Captain

    Hawthorn
    Other teams:
    Joined:
    Feb 08
    Posts:
    275
    Location:
    perth
    Heres some written info from wiki

    Wouter Loos and a cabin boy, considered only minor offenders, were marooned on mainland Australia, never to be heard of again. Reports of unusually light-skinned Aborigines in the area by later British settlers have been suggested as evidence that the two men might have been adopted into a local Aboriginal clan. Some amongst the Amangu people of the mainland have a blood group specific to Leyden, in Holland.[5] However, numerous other European shipwreck survivors, such as those from the wreck of the Zuytdorp in the same region in 1712, may also have had such contact with indigenous inhabitants.
  13. morri

    morri Rookie

    North Melbourne
    Other teams:
    Western Cape, Springboks, Proteas .
    Joined:
    Nov 11
    Posts:
    415
    Some one aboriginal I reckon, but if you are talking about Europeans I have heard it was the dutch, but they werent to interested since they only saw the rocky coast unlike cook who saw the more accessible part of australia..
  14. Ted38

    Ted38 Team Captain

    West Coast
    Other teams:
    The Jihadi Jets
    Joined:
    Jan 06
    Posts:
    4,213
    Bloody boat people, and they're still arriving:(
  15. CLUBMEDhurst

    CLUBMEDhurst Team Captain

    Collingwood
    Other teams:
    Man City
    Joined:
    Sep 08
    Posts:
    4,598
    Location:
    Asha Bhosle's bosom
    Makassan sea cucumber processors
  16. worbod

    worbod Team Captain

    Western Bulldogs
    Other teams:
    Liverpool
    Joined:
    Oct 08
    Posts:
    1,726
    Location:
    Bendigo

    That certainly isn't why I asked the question originally. I have noticed over the years that there are people within society who believe that Captain Cook was the person who discovered Australia, simply because he commanded the First Fleet. I was interested to try and obtain a definite answer after hearing talk about William Dampier on an episode of QI. It's just one of those common misconceptions in life, similar to people thinking that Atlas carried the world upon his shoulders in Greek mythology, or that polar bears and penguins live in the same region, that Jonah was swallowed by a whale or that ninjas have always dressed in black.
  17. RobbieGray17

    RobbieGray17 All Australian

    Port Adelaide
    Other teams:
    Joined:
    Sep 07
    Posts:
    6,165
    Location:
    adelaide
    I believe, and don't quote me, but Abel Tasman discovered Australia before cook, but the technical classification of 'discovering' a country didn't apply as he only discovered parts of the continent.
  18. Hap Hapablap

    Hap Hapablap Que Pasa? Ole...

    West Coast
    Other teams:
    Lakers,Inter,Man U,Subi
    Joined:
    Jun 06
    Posts:
    8,953
    Location:
    Where the cows go bong.
    some now claim a chinese explorer in the 14th century hit australian shores then.

    edit:11th to 12th century as mentioned by others
  19. 17beams

    17beams Senior List

    Collingwood
    Other teams:
    Joined:
    Nov 09
    Posts:
    206
    Cook commanded the Endeavour which landed in Botany Bay in 1770, the First Fleet didn't arrive in Australia untill 1788 and was lead Admiral Aruthur Phillip.
  20. Howard Littlejohn

    Howard Littlejohn Club Legend

    North Melbourne
    Other teams:
    The Sack Scott Wade Club
    Joined:
    May 06
    Posts:
    8,411
    Location:
    Canberra
    My guess has always been "partly".
    British Empire and all that, its not a big stretch from being the first to discover and chart part of east coast, and the site the first colony would later be, to being deemed to have discovered Australia. Particularly with a British narrative of history, it is seen as the important part of the story and the "real discovery". That possibly tended to be perpetuated because most national history textbooks are published in Sydney, and again in they eyes of many that is important enough to be considered the important discovery. The Cook discovery has been played up, by both British Empire and Sydney biases, to the point where the facts get blurred in the minds of many.
    Even as a kid (in Tasmania) I found it strange that we were taught about Tasman's discovery of our island in 1642 - I don't think the WA part of the journey got a mention, though NZ may have done - and then later we had textbooks which referred to Cook's discovery over a century later as the discovery of Australia.