News 2019 St Kilda Media Thread

(Log in to remove this ad.)

Premium

Premiership Player
Joined
Oct 8, 2016
Posts
3,925
Likes
7,121
AFL Club
St Kilda
“permanent structural damage to his brain”


Garry Lyon has slammed comments made by concussion campaigner Peter Jess after Paddy McCartin’s latest setback.
McCartin, 22, suffered a head knock during the second quarter of St Kilda’s JLT Community Series match against the Western Bulldogs at Mars Stadium on Sunday – his eighth concussion since 2014.


Jess told The Herald Sun the forward could have “permanent structural damage to his brain” as fears grow about his playing future.

“This is why this comment from Peter Jess annoys me,” Lyon told SEN Breakfast.


“I know Peter Jess is a crusader and a campaigner for concussion, I understand that and good on him, I think it’s a great thing that he is doing.


“But this is not helpful when he says this: ‘My view is that Paddy McCartin, now because of the number of concussions he’s had and the symptoms he’s shown, has probably got permanent structural damage to his brain.’


“That’s just not helpful in any way, Peter. Not helpful for his mum and his dad when you’re guessing there.


“I’m not critical of the work Peter is doing in this area, but that comment there is irresponsible around that.”


McCartin has had an injury-plagued career after he was taken by the Saints with pick No.1 in the 2014 AFL Draft.


He was restricted to 13 games in 2018 due to a concussion sustained against Melbourne in Round 7 and a Linsfranc ligament injury in Round 15 against Port Adelaide.
 

St Muir

Senior List
Joined
Oct 18, 2018
Posts
260
Likes
885
AFL Club
St Kilda
“permanent structural damage to his brain”


Garry Lyon has slammed comments made by concussion campaigner Peter Jess after Paddy McCartin’s latest setback.
McCartin, 22, suffered a head knock during the second quarter of St Kilda’s JLT Community Series match against the Western Bulldogs at Mars Stadium on Sunday – his eighth concussion since 2014.


Jess told The Herald Sun the forward could have “permanent structural damage to his brain” as fears grow about his playing future.

“This is why this comment from Peter Jess annoys me,” Lyon told SEN Breakfast.


“I know Peter Jess is a crusader and a campaigner for concussion, I understand that and good on him, I think it’s a great thing that he is doing.


“But this is not helpful when he says this: ‘My view is that Paddy McCartin, now because of the number of concussions he’s had and the symptoms he’s shown, has probably got permanent structural damage to his brain.’


“That’s just not helpful in any way, Peter. Not helpful for his mum and his dad when you’re guessing there.


“I’m not critical of the work Peter is doing in this area, but that comment there is irresponsible around that.”


McCartin has had an injury-plagued career after he was taken by the Saints with pick No.1 in the 2014 AFL Draft.


He was restricted to 13 games in 2018 due to a concussion sustained against Melbourne in Round 7 and a Linsfranc ligament injury in Round 15 against Port Adelaide.
The thing is that there's still a lot of guesswork when it comes to concussion, it's a study in progress. Based on what they do know, Paddy is either in deep shit or will be soon. Some of those knocks that have concussed him wouldn't even register in thicker skulls like mine.... I'm really worried about him. He seems like a very genuine & likable young man. Brain damage is a serious thing and as much as I'd like to see him succeed as a top Saints footballer, I'd rather he gave it away.
 

Premium

Premiership Player
Joined
Oct 8, 2016
Posts
3,925
Likes
7,121
AFL Club
St Kilda
Last year we lost Koby Stevens due to this
I hate to say it but if McCartin had concussion on the weekend , his future is well and truly up in the air.
The kid hasn't played to much and he has already copped 8 concussions.
I don't see him playing round one.

Post-concussion syndrome is a complex disorder in which various symptoms — such as headaches and dizziness — last for weeks and sometimes months after the injury that caused the concussion.


Concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury that usually happens after a blow to the head. It can also occur with violent shaking and movement of the head or body. You don't have to lose consciousness to get a concussion or post-concussion syndrome. In fact, the risk of post-concussion syndrome doesn't appear to be associated with the severity of the initial injury.



In most people, symptoms occur within the first seven to 10 days and go away within three months. Sometimes, they can persist for a year or more.


The goal of treatment after concussion is to effectively manage your symptoms.



Symptoms
Post-concussion symptoms include:


  • Headaches
  • Dizziness
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Anxiety
  • Insomnia
  • Loss of concentration and memory
  • Ringing in the ears
  • Blurry vision
  • Noise and light sensitivity
  • Rarely, decreases in taste and smell

Post-concussion headaches can vary and may feel like tension-type headaches or migraines. Most often, they are tension-type headaches. These may be associated with a neck injury that happened at the same time as the head injury.

When to see a doctor

See a doctor if you experience a head injury severe enough to cause confusion or amnesia — even if you never lost consciousness.


If a concussion occurs while you're playing a sport, don't go back in the game. Seek medical attention so that you don't risk worsening your injury.


Reque
 

gringo2011

Premium Gold
Joined
Nov 12, 2011
Posts
20,858
Likes
42,122
Location
Melbourne
AFL Club
St Kilda
Last year we lost Koby Stevens due to this
I hate to say it but if McCartin had concussion on the weekend , his future is well and truly up in the air.
The kid hasn't played to much and he has already copped 8 concussions.
I don't see him playing round one.

Post-concussion syndrome is a complex disorder in which various symptoms — such as headaches and dizziness — last for weeks and sometimes months after the injury that caused the concussion.


Concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury that usually happens after a blow to the head. It can also occur with violent shaking and movement of the head or body. You don't have to lose consciousness to get a concussion or post-concussion syndrome. In fact, the risk of post-concussion syndrome doesn't appear to be associated with the severity of the initial injury.



In most people, symptoms occur within the first seven to 10 days and go away within three months. Sometimes, they can persist for a year or more.


The goal of treatment after concussion is to effectively manage your symptoms.



Symptoms
Post-concussion symptoms include:


  • Headaches
  • Dizziness
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Anxiety
  • Insomnia
  • Loss of concentration and memory
  • Ringing in the ears
  • Blurry vision
  • Noise and light sensitivity
  • Rarely, decreases in taste and smell

Post-concussion headaches can vary and may feel like tension-type headaches or migraines. Most often, they are tension-type headaches. These may be associated with a neck injury that happened at the same time as the head injury.

When to see a doctor

See a doctor if you experience a head injury severe enough to cause confusion or amnesia — even if you never lost consciousness.


If a concussion occurs while you're playing a sport, don't go back in the game. Seek medical attention so that you don't risk worsening your injury.


Reque

I had quite a few concussions when I was young, I think I was a bit of a Paddy. I'd go down very easily including twice hospitalised from king hits. I went out like a light switch and was out for a considerable time the one time. When I played sport and got a bad head knock I'd get dizziness and ear ringing and vision would go a bit tunnelled. I find now in my 40s I don't get depressed or anything like some report but I do find I'm a bit slower to recall names of famous people and stuff these days. Don't know if it's age or brain damage. I know footy players get more hits, but I don't know how bad the concussions are for everyone. Some are more predisposed to the negative impacts later in life just like some are more prone to getting the concussions would be my guess.
 

(Log in to remove this ad.)

Premium

Premiership Player
Joined
Oct 8, 2016
Posts
3,925
Likes
7,121
AFL Club
St Kilda
I had quite a few concussions when I was young, I think I was a bit of a Paddy. I'd go down very easily including twice hospitalised from king hits. I went out like a light switch and was out for a considerable time the one time. When I played sport and got a bad head knock I'd get dizziness and ear ringing and vision would go a bit tunnelled. I find now in my 40s I don't get depressed or anything like some report but I do find I'm a bit slower to recall names of famous people and stuff these days. Don't know if it's age or brain damage. I know footy players get more hits, but I don't know how bad the concussions are for everyone. Some are more predisposed to the negative impacts later in life just like some are more prone to getting the concussions would be my guess.
I always remember a playing junior footy and a guy in our team got a kick in the head , knocked him out , looked fine after the game , the next day he died in his sleep (was only 15)I have a skull like a rock ape and would most probably need a pretty good hit to knock us out , however some people it doesn't take much.

Remember this

McCartin feared for career after repeated concussions

YOUNG St Kilda forward Paddy McCartin didn't know if he would return to football last year after suffering his sixth concussion since 2014.

However, after receiving approval from doctors to keep playing, and donning a helmet because of an ultimatum from coach Alan Richardson, McCartin is confident about the direction in which his career is heading.

The 22-year-old has played 12 games so far this year, the most he has managed in any season since being drafted with the first selection overall in 2014, and spoke to reporters at RSEA Park on Tuesday about his struggles.

"This time last year, it was a pretty tough time. I didn't even really know if I was going to be playing, to be honest," McCartin said.

"There was a lot of stuff, a lot of water to go under the bridge, before I even pulled on the boots again really.

"From where I am now to this time last year is a pretty stark difference.





"To say I'm enjoying my footy would be an understatement. I'm absolutely loving it because there was a bit of a time last year, the future probably wasn't looking too bright, to be honest."

McCartin's seventh concussion came during the Melbourne clash in round seven. He missed two games, with his treatment "very conservative", and returned against Richmond with new headwear.

"I've put the helmet on now, which took me a little bit to get used to, and I wasn't too keen on it, to be honest, but Richo sort of gave me the ultimatum, wear it or I probably won't play," McCartin said.

"I've chucked it on and I've actually really enjoyed it. It probably took me a couple of training sessions to get used to but now I hardly notice it at all."

Having to deal with type 1 diabetes has been an issue but with more experience, he has learned to manage it better.

"My diabetes is going really well. Probably the best management I've had ever, really," McCartin said.

"I've had it for 14 years, so that's going really well. It can be quite a challenging illness at times, which I'm sure a lot of people who have type 1 diabetes know, but I've got fantastic support networks in place for that."

Media scrutiny has been a constant for McCartin, but he takes a philosophical approach to it.

"I don't really take any notice of it to be honest. That might sound like a bit of a cliché potentially, because I know there are a lot of people who do take notice of it, but I'm pretty comfortable in my own skin and the effort that I'm putting in," McCartin said.





https://www.afl.com.au/news/2019-03-11/liked-the-look-who-impressed-for-your-club-in-jlt2
 
Joined
May 2, 2018
Posts
1,357
Likes
4,949
Location
The ghost of the G.G. Huggins Stand
AFL Club
St Kilda
Other Teams
Stoke City, Southampton.
I had quite a few concussions when I was young, I think I was a bit of a Paddy. I'd go down very easily including twice hospitalised from king hits. I went out like a light switch and was out for a considerable time the one time. When I played sport and got a bad head knock I'd get dizziness and ear ringing and vision would go a bit tunnelled. I find now in my 40s I don't get depressed or anything like some report but I do find I'm a bit slower to recall names of famous people and stuff these days. Don't know if it's age or brain damage. I know footy players get more hits, but I don't know how bad the concussions are for everyone. Some are more predisposed to the negative impacts later in life just like some are more prone to getting the concussions would be my guess.
In diabetics, concussion has a greater impact, causes more severe symptoms and is slower to resolve than in non-diabetics. Without going into too much detail, the problem is you need glucose to feed the brain, and to aid in the recovery of the affected neurons.

Of course in a diabetic, the problem is the sugar doesn't get into the cells and remains in the bloodstream, starving the type1 diabetic of the nutrition he requires and in this case, the pure energy to promote healing in the brain. 20% of our glucose intake is used by the brain. Our little miracle is the most expensive organ to run.

As for Paddy, having researched this, I hate to admit it, but I fear he is cooked. You can see how easily he is knocked around. He's like a punch drunk boxer. Sure, he could battle on, but one or two more concussions will almost guarantee he suffers a permanent brain injury, if he hasn't got one brewing already.
 

St Muir

Senior List
Joined
Oct 18, 2018
Posts
260
Likes
885
AFL Club
St Kilda
In diabetics, concussion has a greater impact, causes more severe symptoms and is slower to resolve than in non-diabetics. Without going into too much detail, the problem is you need glucose to feed the brain, and to aid in the recovery of the affected neurons.

Of course in a diabetic, the problem is the sugar doesn't get into the cells and remains in the bloodstream, starving the type1 diabetic of the nutrition he requires and in this case, the pure energy to promote healing in the brain. 20% of our glucose intake is used by the brain. Our little miracle is the most expensive organ to run.

As for Paddy, having researched this, I hate to admit it, but I fear he is cooked. You can see how easily he is knocked around. He's like a punch drunk boxer. Sure, he could battle on, but one or two more concussions will almost guarantee he suffers a permanent brain injury, if he hasn't got one brewing already.
I didn’t know diabetes magnified this problem. It’s really disturbing. I feel so sorry for him.
 

Diehard Saint

Norm Smith Medallist
Joined
Jan 17, 2016
Posts
6,065
Likes
18,071
Location
Melbourne
AFL Club
St Kilda
In diabetics, concussion has a greater impact, causes more severe symptoms and is slower to resolve than in non-diabetics. Without going into too much detail, the problem is you need glucose to feed the brain, and to aid in the recovery of the affected neurons.

Of course in a diabetic, the problem is the sugar doesn't get into the cells and remains in the bloodstream, starving the type1 diabetic of the nutrition he requires and in this case, the pure energy to promote healing in the brain. 20% of our glucose intake is used by the brain. Our little miracle is the most expensive organ to run.

As for Paddy, having researched this, I hate to admit it, but I fear he is cooked. You can see how easily he is knocked around. He's like a punch drunk boxer. Sure, he could battle on, but one or two more concussions will almost guarantee he suffers a permanent brain injury, if he hasn't got one brewing already.
Terribly sad. He’s a young guy with his whole life ahead of him. I can’t imagine how his parents must be feeling with both their sons suffering concussion issues.

I’d be telling him to give it away.
 

Premium

Premiership Player
Joined
Oct 8, 2016
Posts
3,925
Likes
7,121
AFL Club
St Kilda
Saints pair not ruled out for round one

St Kilda pair Dylan Roberton and Paddy McCartin, who had health concerns that put them in hospital on Sunday night, remarkably remain hopeful that they could play round one of the season.
Roberton emerged from the club on Tuesday saying he felt fine again after having a turn at the end of the game on Sunday and he was awaiting the results of further tests but he was confident he would be fit for the season opener.
The club confirmed that the issue at the end of the game that left Roberton feeling "wonky" and treated by paramedics in the rooms was heart-related.
Roberton had a defibrillator implanted last year after he collapsed on the field due to a heart issue and missed the rest of the season. He had played a JLT game, another practice match, match simulation at training and passed stress tests before, at the end of the second JLT game, he suffered another heart irregularity.

St Kilda's Dylan Roberton.Credit:Jason South
Advertisement

The club would not comment on whether the defibrillator activated on Sunday.
Regardless of whether it activated, data is able to be recovered from the device for his cardiologist to assess to understand what occurred with his heart at the end of the match.
McCartin spent the night in a Ballarat hospital after his eighth concussion in five years when he was involved in a relatively minor collision in a marking contest. His symptoms were understood to have eased steadily since the incident and he remained hopeful that with a fortnight before the first game he would be yet be clear to play.
AFL football operations manager Steve Hocking said the clubs were best placed to make decisions on when players were clear to play again, but the league's chief medical officer Dr Peter Harcourt was available as support.
"We'll certainly do whatever is needed ... we won't impose ourselves on that. If required we'll definitely support where we can. That is St Kilda's story," Hocking said.

Sports cardiologist, Associate Professor David Prior, who is the deputy director of cardiology at St Vincent's Hospital and associate professor of cardiology at Melbourne University, said that previously people with defibrillator implanted had abandoned competitive sport.
He said there had been a change in attitude in recent years after professional sportspeople chose to continue competing with an implant. He said there were about 300-400 athletes around the world competing with defibrillators.
"It does seem to come at a cost that they are more likely to get shocked by their devices," Prior said.
Prior, who established Melbourne Sports Cardiology, Australia’s first specific sports and exercise cardiology clinic, stressed that he was not aware of the specifics of the Roberton case and was talking broadly about athletes with defibrillators.
"There is a bit of published work on this that high-level athletes are more likely to get shocked than people who exercise at a low level," Prior said.

"People who get shocked (by the defibrillator implant) describe it as like being kicked in the chest by a horse. Some people feel a bit funny before it happens, others feel nothing until it happens."
He said that if the defibrillator had activated, the first thing a cardiologist would want to know was if it was a mistake by the defibrillator or if it triggered properly then what caused it to trigger.
"What we do not know is whether repeated shocks have some long-term effect on the heart if you get too many of them."
 

Joffaboy

Hall of Famer
Joined
Dec 4, 2000
Posts
32,920
Likes
49,318
Location
The Bay
AFL Club
St Kilda
Other Teams
NO Saints
Saints pair not ruled out for round one

St Kilda pair Dylan Roberton and Paddy McCartin, who had health concerns that put them in hospital on Sunday night, remarkably remain hopeful that they could play round one of the season.
Roberton emerged from the club on Tuesday saying he felt fine again after having a turn at the end of the game on Sunday and he was awaiting the results of further tests but he was confident he would be fit for the season opener.
The club confirmed that the issue at the end of the game that left Roberton feeling "wonky" and treated by paramedics in the rooms was heart-related.
Roberton had a defibrillator implanted last year after he collapsed on the field due to a heart issue and missed the rest of the season. He had played a JLT game, another practice match, match simulation at training and passed stress tests before, at the end of the second JLT game, he suffered another heart irregularity.

St Kilda's Dylan Roberton.Credit:Jason South
Advertisement

The club would not comment on whether the defibrillator activated on Sunday.
Regardless of whether it activated, data is able to be recovered from the device for his cardiologist to assess to understand what occurred with his heart at the end of the match.
McCartin spent the night in a Ballarat hospital after his eighth concussion in five years when he was involved in a relatively minor collision in a marking contest. His symptoms were understood to have eased steadily since the incident and he remained hopeful that with a fortnight before the first game he would be yet be clear to play.
AFL football operations manager Steve Hocking said the clubs were best placed to make decisions on when players were clear to play again, but the league's chief medical officer Dr Peter Harcourt was available as support.
"We'll certainly do whatever is needed ... we won't impose ourselves on that. If required we'll definitely support where we can. That is St Kilda's story," Hocking said.

Sports cardiologist, Associate Professor David Prior, who is the deputy director of cardiology at St Vincent's Hospital and associate professor of cardiology at Melbourne University, said that previously people with defibrillator implanted had abandoned competitive sport.
He said there had been a change in attitude in recent years after professional sportspeople chose to continue competing with an implant. He said there were about 300-400 athletes around the world competing with defibrillators.
"It does seem to come at a cost that they are more likely to get shocked by their devices," Prior said.
Prior, who established Melbourne Sports Cardiology, Australia’s first specific sports and exercise cardiology clinic, stressed that he was not aware of the specifics of the Roberton case and was talking broadly about athletes with defibrillators.
"There is a bit of published work on this that high-level athletes are more likely to get shocked than people who exercise at a low level," Prior said.

"People who get shocked (by the defibrillator implant) describe it as like being kicked in the chest by a horse. Some people feel a bit funny before it happens, others feel nothing until it happens."
He said that if the defibrillator had activated, the first thing a cardiologist would want to know was if it was a mistake by the defibrillator or if it triggered properly then what caused it to trigger.
"What we do not know is whether repeated shocks have some long-term effect on the heart if you get too many of them."
Well that clears everything up

On SM-G960F using BigFooty.com mobile app
 
Joined
Jun 4, 2018
Posts
818
Likes
2,589
AFL Club
St Kilda
if mccartin cant get up after that 'knock' to the head surely this is the end. I'd really love him to come good, but players take knocks like that almost every couple of games. Normally they just get up and play on, but obviously paddy's noggin is a bit tender. He'll be missing ten games a year from concussion at that rate.

He's a smart guy with a great character, there's so much more to life than getting knocked out every second week.

I know it might sound like I'm going early, but if he asked me I'd say why risk it, you've been dealt a sh*t hand, don't go all in
 
Top Bottom