NFL 2021 — NFL Pre-Draft Discussion

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GG.exe

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drd23

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GG.exe

Killer on the Road ™
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About Belichicks methodology of setting a big board, horizontal and vertical....

 

andana

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N.F.L. Draft Process Adapts With the Pandemic
nytimes.com

By Emmanuel Morgan
April 19, 2021
Micah Parsons relaxed his 246-pound body as he decelerated from running the 40-yard dash in front of N.F.L. scouts at a predraft showcase hosted by his college, Penn State, in late March.
When Parsons, a linebacker projected to be one of the first defensive players selected in the 2021 N.F.L. draft, learned he clocked in at 4.39 seconds — a time comparable to receivers and running backs — he pounded his chest and pointed upward.
“It’s like a weight lifted off my shoulders,” he said afterward. “Now I can finally relax.”
Parsons, 21, is one of over 100 Division I players who opted out of the 2020 college football season because of coronavirus concerns, leaving N.F.L. talent evaluators precious little current information to go on in a year further hindered by the absence of a traditional scouting combine. Parsons knew that his data offered his strongest argument for why a franchise should still draft him a year after his last in-game action.

Along with some other star players who opted out, such as Louisiana State receiver Ja’Marr Chase and Oregon offensive lineman Penei Sewell, Parsons is among the potential first-round picks who are trying to remind N.F.L. teams of the promise and acumen they haven’t been able to display publicly in over a year.


As important as pro days have been to this year’s scouting process, those involved acknowledged that the circumstances were less than ideal. Prospects at one school may work out or test on grass while others run on FieldTurf or another surface, creating an unequal comparison.
“I think also we’re trying to compensate for what we see on tape and matching what we see in the player,” said Howie Roseman, the Philadelphia Eagles’ general manager.
With pro days scattered across the country and Covid-19 protocols still in effect for team staffs, scouting departments had to choose which workouts, if any, to attend in person. The Los Angeles Rams, who hold six total picks in this year’s draft, none in the first round, sent scouts to about a dozen pro day workouts, J.W. Jordan, the team’s director of draft management, said. Because of coronavirus concerns, the team instructed scouts to travel only by car and prohibited overnight stays, which limited them to regional workouts.
“From a scouting perspective, it’s getting less and less necessary for you to go in person,” Jordan said. “Everything you’re trying to accomplish they already give it to you.”


Parsons had 109 tackles and was an all-American as a sophomore in 2019, so he trusted that film of his game performance would show him as an elite competitor. But he said he faced questions about why he opted out last August as well as lingering character concerns stemming from a 2018 hazing accusation against him and other Penn State players made by a former teammate. Parsons’s accuser filed a lawsuit against Coach James Franklin and the university, claiming the coach ignored the claims. The university investigated the claims and took them to the Centre County, Pa., district attorney, who declined to bring charges. Penn State has filed for the suit to be dismissed.
In his video interviews with teams, Parsons sometimes talked with just one person and at other times with a team’s entire defensive unit. He told evaluators that the health of his 2-year-old son, Malcolm, was his biggest concern in opting out, a response he said some teams easily accepted, while others pushed harder.
Parsons said he had been more adamant, though, in addressing concerns over his character, emphasizing that once a team drafts him and interacts with him in person daily those concerns will be resolved.
“It made me want to show how much of a hard worker I am and how good of a father I am,” said Parsons, who will attend the draft in Cleveland on April 29 with Malcolm in tow. “I’m going to make sure I never put myself in a situation that is going to dictate my future or put the team in jeopardy.”
 

GG.exe

Killer on the Road ™
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NFL Network's Daniel Jeremiah and ESPN's Mel Kiper both believe the 49ers will select Alabama QB Mac Jones with the third overall pick.

NFL Network's Daniel Jeremiah reports that some medical issues "popped" for LSU WR Terrace Marshall.

NFL Network's Ian Rapoport reports Ohio State QB Justin Fields is managing epilepsy but it is not expected to interfere with his ability to play football.

NFL Network's Daniel Jeremiah stated, "I think we'll see a right turn in a Nascar race before we see Dave Gettleman trade back."
 

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GG.exe

Killer on the Road ™
Sep 6, 2005
118,445
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In every girl's wet dream ℠
AFL Club
Fremantle
Other Teams
St.George
Speaking Thursday, Broncos GM George Paton revealed he had spoken with Dolphins GM Chris Grier on Wednesday.
We will try not to overstate this — it isn't exactly uncommon for GMs to be speaking this time of year — but Paton's admission comes amidst reports the Dolphins would like to trade back down from No. 6, while it would make sense for the quarterback-needy Broncos to move up from No. 9. Paton and Grier also worked together for six years in Miami, so they have a longtime relationship. This is one trade with a real chance of happening between now and next Thursday's first round.
SOURCE: Zac Stevens on Twitter
Apr 22, 2021, 5:06 PM ET
 

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