A Third Team In Sydney - It's Only a Matter Of Time !!

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BringBackTorps

Club Legend
Jan 5, 2017
2,800
1,735
AFL Club
GWS
Female GR AF has been having strong growth in the NSW North Coast comp. (not to be confused with the Northern Rivers AF comp., for areas adjacent to the Qld. border). The Swans AFLW team, starting December 2022, is expected to greatly stimulate this growth.

"[in 2022] AFL North Coast will launch its Youth Girls Under 14 competition. This comes off the back of the phenomenal success of the Youth Girls Under 17 competition in 2017, and the Women’s competition the following year.

Matt Crawley, Northern NSW Development Lead, said that female participation continues to grow year on year. “After just five seasons of Youth Girls footy we now find that 28% of participants in our Junior Competition are girls, and despite the Women’s Competition starting a year later, 25% of participants in our Senior Competition are Women.

“Other regions that have already implemented the younger girls only divisions have seen an explosion in the numbers of girls who are keen to play and we know it will be the same on the North Coast. A number of clubs have ready made teams so the ground work is already done.”

 
Last edited:

RedV3x

Premiership Player
Dec 14, 2015
3,534
911
AFL Club
Fremantle
Female GR AF has been having strong growth in the NSW North Coast comp. (not to be confused with the Northern Rivers AF comp., for areas adjacent to the Qld. border). The Swans AFLW team, starting December 2022, is expected to greatly stimulate this growth.

"[in 2022] AFL North Coast will launch its Youth Girls Under 14 competition. This comes off the back of the phenomenal success of the Youth Girls Under 17 competition in 2017, and the Women’s competition the following year.

Matt Crawley, Northern NSW Development Lead, said that female participation continues to grow year on year. “After just five seasons of Youth Girls footy we now find that 28% of participants in our Junior Competition are girls, and despite the Women’s Competition starting a year later, 25% of participants in our Senior Competition are Women.

“Other regions that have already implemented the younger girls only divisions have seen an explosion in the numbers of girls who are keen to play and we know it will be the same on the North Coast. A number of clubs have ready made teams so the ground work is already done.”


Opportunity begat opportunity.
 

TWLS

Club Legend
Jul 19, 2015
1,230
432
WA
AFL Club
West Coast
Other Teams
GWS Giants
Female GR AF has been having strong growth in the NSW North Coast comp. (not to be confused with the Northern Rivers AF comp., for areas adjacent to the Qld. border). The Swans AFLW team, starting December 2022, is expected to greatly stimulate this growth.

"[in 2022] AFL North Coast will launch its Youth Girls Under 14 competition. This comes off the back of the phenomenal success of the Youth Girls Under 17 competition in 2017, and the Women’s competition the following year.

Matt Crawley, Northern NSW Development Lead, said that female participation continues to grow year on year. “After just five seasons of Youth Girls footy we now find that 28% of participants in our Junior Competition are girls, and despite the Women’s Competition starting a year later, 25% of participants in our Senior Competition are Women.

“Other regions that have already implemented the younger girls only divisions have seen an explosion in the numbers of girls who are keen to play and we know it will be the same on the North Coast. A number of clubs have ready made teams so the ground work is already done.”

Great work again on the link. I can remember when a few years ago when BBT and I were the only ones on here showing any interest in NSW Womens Footy development.
The point is just how big can it get up there. There are a lot of unknowns to sort of quote Donald Rumsfield on his opinion of the Iraq War.
 

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RedV3x

Premiership Player
Dec 14, 2015
3,534
911
AFL Club
Fremantle
I can remember when a few years ago when BBT and I were the only ones on here showing any interest in NSW Womens Footy development.

...on BigFooty..... Do you think that is meaningful ?
 

RedV3x

Premiership Player
Dec 14, 2015
3,534
911
AFL Club
Fremantle
non anglo-celtic background players appear to be underrepresented,

How often do you see these Celtic names in your apparition.


Achadh Nan Leac Scottish Gaelic
Adair Celtic
Mostly Scottish surname meaning "at the oak ford".
Ahearna Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Either from an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Eachthighearna meaning "descendant of Eachthighearna", or else an anglicized form of Eachthighearna.
Ajax Welsh
Alan Crom Scottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous village.
Alsandair Irish
Am Magh Fada Scottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous former burgh.
Ancrum Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Alan Crom.
Anderson Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Ghille Andrais meaning 'Son of the devotee of St. Andrew'. ... [more]
Angley Irish
Anna English, Irish, Italian, Hungarian
Probably derived from the female first name Anna.
Ànsruthair Scottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous town.
Anwell Welsh
Anwyl Welsh
Aran Irish
From the given name Aran 1.
Ardies Irish
Irish Isle Of Ards
Argyle Scottish, Scottish Gaelic
From the regional name Argyll, a county of southwestern Scotland, named in Gaelic as Earre Ghàidheal ‘coast of the Gaels’. Argyll was the earliest part of Scotland to be settled by Gaelic speakers from Ireland from the 6th century onwards... [more]
Argyll Scottish, Scottish Gaelic
From the regional name Argyll, a county of southwestern Scotland, named in Gaelic as Earre Ghàidheal ‘coast of the Gaels’. Argyll was the earliest part of Scotland to be settled by Gaelic speakers from Ireland from the 6th century onwards... [more]
Arzur Breton
Derived from the Breton given name of Arzhur.
Ashe Irish
Baclan Celtic (Rare)
Form of the surname Backlund
Badrick Manx
Baile Phùir Scottish Gaelic
Proper, non-Anglicized form of Balfour.
Bainebridge English, Irish
Bridge over the Bain, An English town named for its place on the river Bain, now used as a surname. Lives near the bridge over the white water... [more]
Balch Welsh
From the Welsh adjective balch, which has a range of meanings—"fine", "splendid", "proud", "arrogant", "glad"—but the predominant meaning is "proud" and from this the family name probably derives.
Bannon Irish
Barnewall Anglo-Norman, Irish
A locational surname given to those who lived by a stream in either Cambridgeshire, which derives its name from the Olde English beorna meaning "warrior" and wella meaning "stream", or from one in Northamptonshire, which got its name from the Olde English byrge meaning "burial mound" and well, which also means "stream." a burial mound and 'well(a)'... [more]
Barrach Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic spelling of Dunbar.
Barrentine Irish
Barrington English, Irish
English: habitational name from any of several places called Barrington. The one in Gloucestershire is named with the Old English personal name Beorn + -ing- denoting association + tun ‘settlement’... [more]
Barry Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Beargha meaning, 'descendant of Beargh.'
Barter Welsh
Baughan Welsh
Variant of Vaughan.
Baughn Welsh
Variant of Vaughan.
Beacom Irish
Northern Irish variant of Beauchamp.
Beddoe Welsh
Variant of Beddow.
Beddow Welsh
From the personal name Bedo, a pet form of Meredydd (see Meredith).
Beever Manx
Bennion Celtic
Beollan English, Irish, Scottish Gaelic
English: variant of Boland.... [more]
Bethel English, Welsh (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Welsh ab Ithel "son of Ithel".
Beynon Welsh
From Welsh ab Einon meaning "son of Einon". Einon is a variant of Einion.
Biddle English, Irish
Variant of English BEADLE or German BITTEL. The name is now popular in the north east region of America, where it was brought by English and Irish immigrants.
Bihan Breton
Bihan means small in Breton.
Bires Irish
Irish Derivation of Byres
Blackerby English, Irish, Scottish
English surname of unexplained origin, probably from the name of a lost or unidentified place.
Blacksmith English, Welsh, Scottish
This last name is an occupation last name. A "blacksmith" means a person who makes and repairs things in iron by hand.
Blain Scottish (Anglicized), Scottish Gaelic, English
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Bláán, a shortened form of MACBLAIN, or a variant of Blin... [more]
Blaney Irish
Topographic name from Welsh blaenau, plural of blaen "point, tip, end", i.e. uplands, or remote region, or upper reaches of a river.
Bledig Welsh
"like a wolf"
Bleuzen Breton
Derived from the feminine given name Bleuzenn.
Blevens Welsh
Alternate spelling of Blevins.
Blin Welsh
The same as Blaen, a point, the inland extremity of a valley. Blin also signifies weary, troublesome.
Blood Welsh
Anglicized form of Welsh ap Llwyd ‘son of Llwyd’.
Blythin Welsh
Recorded as Blethin, Bleythin, Bleything, Blythin, and others, this is a surname which has Welsh royal connections. It derives from the Ancient British personal name "Bleddyn," translating as the son of Little Wolf... [more]
Boden Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Buadáin.
Bohan Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of the Gaelic Ó Buadhacháin, which comes from the word "buadhach," meaning "victorious."
Bohannon Irish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Buadhachanáin, a double diminutive of buadhach ‘victorious’
Boiteux French, Breton
From a Breton nickname meaning "lame".
Bolan Irish
From the given name Beollán.
Bolger Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Ó Bolguidir.
Bolitho Cornish
Habitational name for someone originally from the locality of Bolitho in western Cornwall, derived from Old Cornish bod or bos meaning "dwelling" combined with an unknown personal name.
Bollard English, Irish
According to MacLysaght, this surname of Dutch origin which was taken to Ireland early in the 18th century.
Bolloré Breton
Bolloré derives from bod which means bush and lore which means laurel in Breton
Bonar Irish
A "translation" of Irish Gaelic Ó Cnáimhsighe "descendant of Cnáimhseach", a nickname meaning literally "midwife" and ostensibly a derivative of Gaelic cnámh "bone".
Bonnar Irish, Gaelic
Translation of the Gaelic "O'Cnaimhsighe", descendant of Cnaimhseach, a byname meaning "Midwife
Bonny English, Irish
Bosinney Cornish
Denotes the original bearer came from Bossiney, Cornwall. Bossiney comes from Cornish Bod and Cini, meaning "Cini's dwelling," with Cini being a Cornish name of unknown meaning.... [more]
Bosser Breton
Bosser means butcher in Breton.
Bosustow Cornish
bos Ustoc, dwelling of Ustoc, poss: bos-ysow, corn abode
Bowden Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Buadáin.
Bowe Medieval English, English, Irish (Anglicized)
There are three possible sources of this surname, the first being that it is a metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of bows, a vital trade in medieval times before the invention of gunpowder, and a derivative of the Old English pre 7th Century 'boga', bow, from 'bugan' to bend... [more]
Bowie Scottish Gaelic
Scots Gaelic Bhuidhe or Buidhe meaning "golden yellow". Name was originally Mac Gille Bhuid, meaning "son of the yellow-haired lad". It was shortened to MacilBuie and MacilBowie in the 1600's, and further shortened in the 1700's to Buie and anglicised to Bowie by English speaking census takers and record keepers on the Scottish mainland.
Bowne Welsh
The Welsh name Bowne is a patronymic surname created from the Welsh personal name Owen or Owein. The surname Bowne was originally ab-Owen, meaning "son of Owein."
Boycott English, Irish
Boyne English, Irish, Scottish
English: variant of Boon.... [more]
Bracken Irish
From Irish Ó Breacáin meaning "descendant of Breacán", a personal name from a diminutive of breac 'speckled', 'spotted', which was borne by a 6th-century saint who lived at Ballyconnel, County Cavan, and was famous as a healer; St... [more]
Bragg English, Welsh
From a nickname for a cheerful or lively person, derived from Middle English bragge meaning "lively, cheerful, active", also "brave, proud, arrogant".
Brain Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized), Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Mac an Bhreitheamhan ‘son of the judge’, from breitheamh ‘judge’.
Braith Irish
Braithnoch Irish
Branagan Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Branagáin.
Branagh Irish
Anglicisation of Irish Ó Branduibh meaning "descendant of Breathnach", a given name meaning "Welshman". A famous bearer is British actor and filmmaker Kenneth Branagh (1960-).
Brangan Irish
Variant of Branagan.
Branigan Irish
Variant of Branagan.
Brankin Irish
Variant of Branagan.
Brannagan Irish
Variant of Branagan.
Brannan Irish
Variant of Brennan.
Brannen Irish
Brannigan Irish
Brannock Irish
Originally taken from the Welsh place name Brecknock. Medieval settlers brought this name to Ireland.
Brazil English (Rare), Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breasail "descendant of Breasal", Breasal being a byname which meant "strife".
Brean Irish
Variant of Breen or Brain.
Breathnach Irish
Breeze Welsh
Derived from the surname Breese, which came from the surname Rees.
Brennen Irish
Breslin Irish
Irish (Sligo and Donegal): Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breisláin ‘descendant of Breisleán’, a diminutive of the personal name Breasal (see Brazil).
Brian Irish, English, French
1) Variant spelling of Bryan. ... [more]
Brick Irish (Anglicized), English, German, Jewish
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bruic ‘descendant of Broc’, i.e. ‘Badger’ (sometimes so translated) or Ó Bric ‘descendant of Breac’, a personal name meaning ‘freckled’... [more]
Bride Irish, Scottish, English
Further Anglicized from Scottish/Irish MacBride, from the root for Brigid.
Broderick Irish, Welsh, English
Surname which comes from two distinct sources. As a Welsh surname it is derived from ap Rhydderch meaning "son of Rhydderch". As an Irish surname it is an Anglicized form of Ó Bruadair meaning "descendent of Bruadar"... [more]
Brophy Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bróithe ‘descendant of Bróth’, a personal name or byname of unknown origin. Also Anglicized as Broy.
Brosnan Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Ó Brosnacháin meaning "descendant of Brosnachán", a given name derived from Brosna, a small village and parish in County Kerry, Ireland.
Brownlee Scottish, Scottish Gaelic, Northern Irish, English
"Brown field" in Old English.
Broy Irish (Anglicized)
Variant of Brophy
Brusnighan Irish
Bryn Welsh
Means hill in welsh
Brynn Welsh
Variant of Bryn
Burdett Irish
Burk English, Irish
Variant of Burke
Burney English, Irish
Form of the French place name of 'Bernay' or adapted from the personal name Bjorn, ultimately meaning "bear".
Bwye Welsh (Rare)
many of this name moved from south wales to india to work for the east india company around 1900's then came back to wales.
Bychan Welsh
Proper, unanglicized form of Vaughan.
Bynes Irish
This is the surname of American actress Amanda Bynes (born April 3, 1986).
Cadan Irish
Anglicized form of Mac Cadain.
Caddick Welsh
From the Welsh male personal name Cadog, a pet-form of Cadfael (a derivative of Welsh cad "battle").
Cadogan Welsh
From the Welsh male personal name Cadwgan, literally probably "battle-scowler". Cadogan Estate is an area of Chelsea and Belgravia, including Cadogan Square, Sloane Street and Sloane Square, owned by the earls of Cadogan, descended from Charles Sloane Cadogan (1728-1807), 1st Earl Cadogan.
Cadoret French, Breton
From an old Breton given name Catuuoret meaning "protector in combat".
Caer Breton
Cagney Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Ó Caingnigh meaning "descendant of Caingneach", a given name meaning "pleader, advocate". A famous bearer was American actor and dancer James Cagney (1899-1986).
Cahill Irish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cathail ‘descendant of Cathal’, a personal name meaning ‘powerful in battle’.
Caimbeul Scottish Gaelic
Proper form of Campbell.
Calbreath Irish
Cale Welsh
Possibly derived from the River Cale. A famous barer of this name is Welsh musician John Cale (1942- ).
Calkin Irish
Variant of Culkin.
Calligan Irish (Rare)
Before Irish names were translated into English, Calligan had a Gaelic form of O Ceallachain, possibly from "ceallach", which means "strife".... [more]
Callister Irish, Scottish, Manx
Reduced form of Mcallister.
Calvey Irish
Variation of McKelvey. Meaning rich in possessions or Irish from the French word bald
Cammon Scottish, Irish
Reduced form of Mccammon.
Camshron Scottish Gaelic
Scottish form of Cameron.
Canavan Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ceanndubháin "descendant of Ceanndubhán", a byname meaning "little black-headed one", from ceann "head" combined with dubh "black" and the diminutive suffix -án.
Candlish Scottish, Irish
Short form of McCandlish.
Cannan Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Mac Canann, Ó Canann, or Ó CANÁIN.
Cannell Manx
Manx cognate of McConnell or O'Connell.
Canning English, Irish (Anglicized), Scottish
Habitational name from a place so named in England. From the Old English byname Cana and -ingas meaning "people of".... [more]
Cantwell Irish, English
A surname used in the South of England.... [more]
Carbrey Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Ó Cairbre and Mac Cairbre meaning "descendant of Cairbre", a given name meaning "charioteer".
Carby Scottish Gaelic
Carew Welsh
Carlan Irish
Anglicized form of Irish O'Carlain or O'Caireallain, from the Irish carla meaning a "wool-comb" and an meaning "one who" which roughly translates as "one who combs wool"... [more]
Carlin Irish (Anglicized), Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cairealláin (sometimes also anglicized as Carlton), meaning "descendant of Caireallán"... [more]
Carlyon Cornish
Cornish: habitational name from any of three places in Cornwall called Carlyon, in St. Minver and Kea parishes. The first element is Celtic ker ‘fort’; the second could represent the plural of Cornish legh ‘slab’.
Carnahan Irish
From the Irish Cearnaghan, meaning "victorious"
Carney Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Catharnaigh "descendant of Catharnach", a byname meaning "warlike".
Carolan Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Ó Cearbhalláin.
Carrey Irish
Variant spelling of Carey. A famous bearer is Canadian-American actor and comedian Jim Carrey (1962-).
Cartan Irish
Variant of McCartan.
Carten Irish
Variant of McCartan.
Carthy Irish (Rare)
Variant of McCarthy or MacCarthy
Cartin Irish
Variant of McCartan.
Carton Irish
Variant of McCartan.
Carvel French, Irish
Variant of Carville.
Carville French, Irish
As a French location name it comes from a settlement in Normandy. As an Irish name it derives from a word for "warrior".
Carwood Irish
Casaday Irish
Variant spelling of Irish Cassidy .
Casement Manx
Anglicized and reduced form of Manx Gaelic Mac Asmuint meaning "son of Ásmundr". A notable bearer was Sir Roger Casement (1864-1916), an Irish-born British consular official and rebel.
Cashion Irish
Anglicized form of either Mac Caisin or Ó Caisin meaning "descendant of Caisín" (see Cassidy).
Caskey Celtic
Cassedy Irish (?), English (?)
Variant of Cassidy.
Cassey Scottish, Irish
This surname originated around ancient Scotland and Ireland. In its Gaelic form it is called, 'O Cathasaigh', which means 'the watchful one'.... [more]
Caulfield Irish
Comes from the Irish Gaelic Mac Cathmhaoil, which was Anglicized to McCawell and then morphed into Caulfield. Mac Cathmhaoil comes from a word meaning "chieftan".
Challoner French, Welsh
Derived from a town in France of the same name. This family derive their origin from Macloy Crum, of the line of chiefs in Wales, who resided several years in Challoner.
Chegwin Cornish
Means "person who lives in or by a white house" (from Cornish chy "house" + gwyn "white").
Chenoweth Cornish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Chi Nowydh.
Chifley Irish, English
Chi Nowydh Cornish
It means "new house".
Chivers Welsh
Cinnamond Scottish, Irish, English
Possibly originates from Scottish place name Kininmonth. Probably introduced to Northern Ireland by Scottish settlers where it remains in Ulster. Another origin is the French place name Saint Amand originated from French Huguenots settling in Ireland.
Clague Celtic, Manx
Contraction of Macliaigh.
Claine Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Gille Eathain, a patronymic name meaning "son of the servant of Saint John."
Clancy Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Mac Fhlannchaidh.
Clarey Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Cléirigh and variant of O'Clery and Cleary.
Clary Irish
Variant of Cleary
Cleas Irish (Rare)
Cleese Scottish, Irish, English
Variant spelling of McCleese. A famous bearer is English actor and comedian John Cleese (1939-).
Cleland Belgian, Scottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish reduced form of McClelland. ... [more]
Clelland Scots, Irish
Scottish and Irish topographical name meaning "clay land".
Clingan Scottish, Scottish Gaelic, Northern Irish
Anglicized form of Macclingan.
Clingane Scottish, Scottish Gaelic
Variant of Clingan.
Clingen Scottish, Scottish Gaelic
Variant of Clingan.
Clooney English, Irish
From Gaelic Ó Cluanaigh meaning "descendant of Cluanach". Cluanach was a given name derived from Irish clauna "deceitful, flattering, rogue".
Cloyd Welsh (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Clwyd.
Clune Irish
Clwyd Welsh
This indicates familial origin near the River Clwyd.
Coach Irish
Origin uncertain. Most probably a reduced form of Irish McCoach, which is of uncertain derivation, perhaps a variant of McCaig.
Coakley Irish
From Irish Gaelic Mac Caochlaoich "son of Caochlaoch", a personal name meaning literally "blind warrior".
Cochran Scottish, Irish
Variant of Cochrane.
Cochrane Scottish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish
Derived from the 'Lowlands of Cochrane' near Paisley, in Renfrewshire, Scotland. Origin is uncertain, the theory it may have derived from the Welsh coch meaning "red" is dismissed because of the historical spelling of the name Coueran.... [more]
Codey Irish
Based off of the given name Cody
Coffee Irish
Variant of Coffey.
Coffelt Irish, German (Anglicized)
From Irish Gaelic Mac Eachaidh meaning "son of Eochaidh". It could also be an Americanized spelling of German Kauffeld (see Caulfield).
Coffey Irish
Ireland County Cork
Coffie Irish
Variant of Coffey.
Coill Irish
Meaning, "hazel tree."
Coineagan Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Cunningham.
Coles English, Scottish, Irish, German (Anglicized), English (American)
English: from a Middle English pet form of Nicholas.... [more]
Colgan Irish
Collyer Irish
Coltrane Irish (Anglicized)
Northern Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Coltaráin.
Comey Irish, Scottish
Comins Irish
Variant of Cummings
Commons Breton
It's generally believed this name comes from a Breton personal name, derived from element "cam," meaning "bent," or "crooked;" or from the herb "cummin" (cumin). Or from the place name Comines, in Flanders, Northern France.... [more]
Conahan Irish (Anglicized)
Irish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Connachaín (see Cunningham).
Condon Irish (Anglicized, Modern)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Condún, itself a Gaelicized form of the Anglo-Norman habitational name de Caunteton... [more]
Condrick Irish
Surname of an Irish immigrant who had snuck onto a ship and travelled to Australia during the early 1900's.
Cone Irish
Reduced form of McCone. Americanized spelling of North German Kohn or Köhn, or Kuhn.
Conklin Irish, Dutch
Origin unidentified. Most likely of Dutch origin (the name is found in the 18th century in the Hudson Valley), or possibly a variant of Irish Coughlin.
Conkling Irish
Variant of Coughlin.
Conlan Irish
Variant of Conlon.
Conley Irish
Variant of Connolly.
Conlin Irish
Variant of Conlon.
Conlon Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Conalláin or Ó Caoindealbháin.
Conneely Irish
from Mac Conghaile or Ó Conghaile, which comes from Ó Conghalaigh... [more]
Conran Irish
The surname Conran is derived from 'O Conarain', and Conran is a more anglicized version.... [more]
Conway Welsh, Scottish, Irish
As a Welsh surname, it comes from the name of a fortified town on the coast of North Wales (Conwy formerly Conway), taken from the name of the river on which it stands. The river name Conwy may mean "holy water" in Welsh.... [more]
Coogan Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name "MacCogadhain"; composed of the Gaelic prefix "mac," which means "son of," and the Gaelic personal name "Cuchogaidh", which means "Hound of War". The name is also found in Ireland as Cogan, Coggan, Coggen, Cogin, Coggon, Coogan and Goggin(s).
Cooglan Irish
Irish surname of unknown meaning. May be a variant of Coghlan.
Cooley Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Chúille ‘son of the servant of (Saint) Mochúille’, a rare Clare name.
Corbet English, Scottish (?), Welsh (?)
Corbett English, Scottish, Welsh
Nickname from Norman French corbet meaning 'little crow, raven'. This surname is thought to have originated in Shropshire. The surname was taken by bearers to Scotland in the 12th Century, and to Northern Ireland in the 17th Century.... [more]
Corker Irish (Americanized, Modern)
Corkery Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corcra "descendant of Corcra", a personal name derived from corcair "purple" (ultimately cognate with Latin purpur).
Corlett Manx
From Manx Gaelic Mac Thorliot "son of Thorliot", a male personal name derived from Old Norse Thórrljótr, literally "Thor-bright".
Cornwall Celtic
One who came from Cornwall, a county in the South West of England.
Corr Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corra "descendant of CORRA".
Corran English, Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Ó Corraidhín.
Corren Irish
Corrin Manx, Scottish
First documented in 1290, sources suggest prototypes to be of Norse and/or Irish origins or a Manx contraction of Mac Oran from Mac Odhrain.
Corris Manx
.
Cosgrove Irish
From the Gaelic name Ó Coscraigh "descendant of Coscrach."
Cossack Irish
Variant of Cusack
Costello Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Oisdealbhaigh meaning "son of Oisdealbhach". The given name Oisdealbhach is derived from Irish os meaning "deer, fawn" and dealbhach meaning "resembling, shapely".
Costigan Irish
Cotter Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Oitir "son of Oitir", a personal name borrowed from Old Norse Óttarr, composed of the elements ótti "fear, dread" and herr "army".
Cough Irish
Coullson Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized, Rare), English
All origins of the name are patronymic. Meanings include an Anglicized version of the Gaelic MacCumhaill, meaning "son of Cumhall", which means "champion" and "stranger and an Anglicized patronymic of the Gaelic MacDhubhghaill, meaning "son of Dubhgall." The personal name comes from the Gaelic words dubh, meaning "black" and gall, meaning "stranger."... [more]
Court English, French, Irish
A topographic name from Middle English, Old French court(e) and curt, meaning ‘court’. This word was used primarily with reference to the residence of the lord of a manor, and the surname is usually an occupational name for someone employed at a manorial court.... [more]
Covey Irish, English
Irish: reduced form of MacCovey, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cobhthaigh (see Coffey).... [more]
Cowley Irish
Coy Irish
Reduced form of McCoy.
Coyle Irish
Irish reduced variant of Mccool.
Cragg Scottish, Irish, English
Variant of Craig, from Middle English Crag.
Cranley Irish
The surname Cranley was first found in Ulster (Irish: Ulaidh), where they held a family seat but were also to be found in County Offaly and Galway. The sept is styled the Princes of Crich Cualgne and are descended from Cu-Ulladh, a Prince in 576.
Craven Irish, English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Crabháin (County Galway) or Mac Crabháin (Louth, Monaghan) ‘descendant (or ‘son’) of Crabhán’... [more]
Crawley English, Irish (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the many places called Crawley, named with Old English crawe ‘crow’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’. Compare Crowley... [more]
Crean Irish
Creel Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized, Modern)
Fish Basket. The word Creel relates to Crille in Gaelic meaning weave.
Creenan Irish
Cregan Irish
Croan Irish
Variant of Croghan.
Croghan Irish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Conchruacháin ‘son of Cú Cruacháin’, a personal name meaning ‘hound of Croghan’... [more]
Cronin Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Ó Cróinín.
Cronine Irish
Variant of Cronin
Cronyn Irish (Anglicized)
Variant of Cronin
Crossan Irish
Irish reduced form of McCrossen, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Chrosáin ‘son of the satirist’... [more]
Crothers Irish
form of Carruthers
Crowley Irish (Anglicized), English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cruadhlaoich ‘descendant of Cruadhlaoch’, a personal name composed of the elements cruadh ‘hardy’ + laoch ‘hero’. ... [more]
Croy Irish (Anglicized)
A shortened form of the surname McRoy, from Irish Gaelic Mac Rúaidh "son of Rúadh", literally "the red one".
Cuadro Celtic (Latinized, Modern)
It refers to a work of art or a painting (picture, frame). It's very common in Portugal.
Cudahy Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Ó Cuidighthigh.
Cuddihy Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cuidighthigh meaning "descendant of Cuidightheach".
Cuffe English, Irish
Culbert Anglo-Saxon, Irish, English, Scottish
Meaning and origin are uncertain. Edward MacLysaght (The Surnames of Ireland, 1999, 6th Ed., Irish Academic Press, Dublin, Ireland and Portland, Oregon, USA) states that this surname is of Huguenot (French Protestant) origin, and found mainly in Ireland's northern province of Ulster... [more]
Culkin Irish
Reduced anglicization of Irish Gaelic Mac Uilcín meaning "descendant of Uilcín", a diminutive of Ulick, itself an Irish diminutive of William.
Cullan Irish
Culvért French, English, Irish
English version of the Old French, Culvere. Means Peaceful and Mildest of tempers.
Cumming Irish, Scottish, English
Perhaps from a Celtic given name derived from the element cam "bent", "crooked"
Cunniff Irish
From Irish Gaelic Mac Conduibh "son of Condubh", a personal name meaning literally "black dog".
Curley Irish
Curnow Cornish
Ethnic name for someone from Cornwall.
Curphey Manx
Sea warror from the Viking
Current Irish
The surname of Current, is of Irish/Scottish with several different families, and meanings of this name. There are many spelling variations of this name.
Currie Scottish, Irish
Irish: Habitational name from Currie in Midlothian, first recorded in this form in 1230. It is derived from Gaelic curraigh, dative case of currach ‘wet plain’, ‘marsh’. It is also a habitational name from Corrie in Dumfriesshire (see Corrie).... [more]
Curtin Irish (Anglicized), Scottish (Anglicized), English
Irish and Scottish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cruitín ‘son of Cruitín’, a byname for a hunchback (see Mccurtain)... [more]
Cusack Irish
An Irish family name of Norman origin, originally from Cussac in Guienne (Aquitaine), France. The surname died out in England, but is common in Ireland, where it was imported at the time of the Norman invasion of Ireland in the 12th century.
Cwmcwlamare Welsh
Dace Irish
Dade Irish
Anglicized form of MacDaibheid, meaning "son of David".
Dady Irish
Variant of Deady.
Dahy Irish
Dailey Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Dálaigh meaning "descendant of DÁLACH".
Daily Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Dálaigh, meaning "descendent of DÁLACH". The name has strong roots in the county Cork.
Dalais Scottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous village.
Dale Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Dall.
Dall Irish
Derived from Old Irish dall, a byname meaning "blind".
Danvers Irish, English
For someone from Anvers, which is the French name of a port called Antwerp, located in what is now Belgium.
Darragh Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Dhubhdarach, a personal name meaning "black one of the oak tree".
Darrah Irish
Variant of Darragh.
Darsey Irish (Anglicized)
Davey English, Welsh
Derived from the given name David. Alternately, it may be a variant spelling of Welsh Davies or Davis, which could be patronymic forms of David, or corrupted forms of Dyfed, an older Welsh surname and the name of a county in Wales.
Davine Irish
Variant of Devin 1.
Davys Welsh, English
Daw Irish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Deaghaidh, ‘descendant of Deaghadh’, a personal name of uncertain origin... [more]
Dawes Irish
The surname Dawes means ‘Irish Guard’
Dawkins English, Welsh
A derivitive of the Hebrew name David which translates to “beloved”. (see Daw)
Dawley English, French, Irish
"From the hedged glade" Originally, D'Awley (probably from D'Awleigh).... [more]
Daye Irish, Scottish
Comes from Irish Ó Déa (m) or Ní Dhéa (f) ... [more]
Days Welsh
Patronymic from the personal name Dai, a pet form of Dafydd, with the redundant addition of the English patronymic suffix -s.
Dea Irish
Irish: reduced form of O’Dea.
Deady Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Déadaigh ‘descendant of Déadach’, a personal name apparently meaning ‘toothy’.






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RedV3x

Premiership Player
Dec 14, 2015
3,534
911
AFL Club
Fremantle
BBT, I think you should alter Wiki as they they say "O'Loughlin was named a member of the Indigenous Team of the Century."

where clearly " The surname O'Loughlin is an Anglicised form of the Irish Ó Lochlainn meaning "descendant of Lochlann".
Here we see Michael O'Loughlin being welcomed by his Celtic brotherhood.

1641099917311.png
 

BringBackTorps

Club Legend
Jan 5, 2017
2,800
1,735
AFL Club
GWS
Balgowlah JFC, on Sydney's Northern Beaches, started in 2015 with just its Auskick clinic- which, by the end of 2015, had 80 players.

In 2021, Balgowlah JFC had 450 players.

The strong AF growth that is happening in Greater Sydney, & throughout all NSW & ACT, bodes very well for a 3rd AFL team, eventually, in very large & very wealthy Sydney.

 

BringBackTorps

Club Legend
Jan 5, 2017
2,800
1,735
AFL Club
GWS
1. "Campbelltown is not an area synonymous with AFL, but the students of St Gregory’s are tearing it up on the field. At a 2021 Paul Kelly Cup regional carnival, the school won the boys competition and were runners-up in the girls. Its reserves boys and girls teams made the semi-finals, showing the school’s depth.

Success on field is one thing, but Howe is equally impressed with the students’ enthusiasm to pull on a pair of boots and chase after a Sherrin. “The large amount of students participating at our AFL trials wishing to represent the College has been extraordinary,” he (D. Howe, Pys. Ed teacher) said.

In fact, around 50 St Gregory’s students played Paul Kelly Cup – that’s about 50 per cent (for any school in Aust., 50% of eligible- based on age- male & female students playing in a school AF comp. is very high) of the school’s eligible cohort.

“There’s a lot of interest and by exposing them to the Paul Kelly Cup, the interschool sport we have on Wednesday, and the AFL coming in for clinics and grade sport lessons is allowing kids to become more passionate and possibly playing on the weekend,” said Howe (Words & emphases in brackets, mine).



The SW of Sydney is, relatively, a weaker area, per capita, for GR AF comp. nos.- but good growth there is also occcuring.
The 50% rate of St Gregorys' eligible students playing in the Paul Kelly school AF comp. is impressive anywhere, but particularly in SW Sydney.






2.
Do you have their names ?

Why don't you check the Balgowlah Suns (now with 450 regd. players, after only 6 years in existence) Grand Final team lists (from aflnswact website fixtures) for surnames? What conclusions do you draw?

I have said several times that, in Greater Sydney, GR AF comp. nos. are underrepresented in non anglo-celtic background persons, on a per capita basis- & I mentioned Greater Sydney AF comp. players from, specifically, "continental Europe, Asian, & Middle Eastern" backgrounds.
 
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RedV3x

Premiership Player
Dec 14, 2015
3,534
911
AFL Club
Fremantle
Why don't you check the Balgowlah Suns (now with 450 regd. players, after only 6 years in existence) Grand Final team lists (from aflnswact website fixtures) for surnames? What conclusions do you draw?

1. Balgowlah is NOT "in Greater Sydney".
2. 20 grand finalist names out of 450 is totally meaningless. Get the 450 names.
3. You made the ridiculous statement so you back it up.
4. I have productive things to do with my time.

The idea that you can tell a person's ethnicity from a name is simply not viable - one marriage can destroy that association.
As per

1641513885163.png
 

BringBackTorps

Club Legend
Jan 5, 2017
2,800
1,735
AFL Club
GWS
So are you saying this guy is anglo-celtic or not ?
You have, on several occasions recently, broken up my comments into segments ie not showing my full sentence (or the accompanying sentence) to present a false impression/out of context of what I have said. As this is very misleading, your deceptive Straw Man practice is inappropriate, & I suggest you desist.

Why did you deliberately omit the remainder of my sentence ie" & I mentioned Greater Sydney AF comp. players from, specifically, 'continental Europe, Asian, & Middle Eastern' backgrounds"? (You quoted only the first part- very misleading).

Virtually all fans of the AFL are very aware that aboriginal-background persons are very overrepresented in the AFL ie c.11% of AFL players- this is not the issue being discussed here.

In very multicultural Greater Sydney, what is your estimate of GR AF comp. players from a "continental Europe, Middle Eastern, Asian", Latin American, Pasifika, & African background? And in Sydney's NW, W, & SW?
 
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RedV3x

Premiership Player
Dec 14, 2015
3,534
911
AFL Club
Fremantle
You have, on several occasions recently, broken up my comments into segments

Yes, because it is very difficult to get a grip on what you are actually trying to say.
I have many times suggested that you break your posts up into concise meaningful posts with a solitary point.

Now. You still haven't the most basic and simple question

where do these guys fit in with your ANGLO-CELTIC NAME theory.

Andrew Walker (Carlton) - 190cm, 123 games
Nathan Lovett-Murray (Essendon) - 190cm, 122 games
Patrick Ryder (Essendon) - 196cm, 114 games
Jonathon Griffin (Fremantle) - 201cm, 48 games
Joel Houghton (Fremantle) - 194cm, 0 games
Michael Johnson (Fremantle) - 194cm, 122 games
Casey Sibosado (Fremantle) - 192cm, 0 games
Joseph Daye (Gold Coast) - 194cm, 3 games
Steven May (Gold Coast) - 190cm, 8 games
Tom Nicholls (Gold Coast) - 200cm, 1 game
Lance Franklin (Hawthorn) - 196cm, 137 games
Troy Taylor (Richmond) - 192cm, 4 games
Adam Goodes (Sydney) - 194cm, 295 games
Liam Jones (Westen Bulldogs) - 197cm, 22 games


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RedV3x

Premiership Player
Dec 14, 2015
3,534
911
AFL Club
Fremantle
this is not the issue being discussed here.

That's right, the issue here is that you state that you can estimate the ethnic participation based on NAMES and presumably names alone.

It's pointless just putting up some pathetic "disagree" emoji - show some balls and defend your statement or withdraw it!
 

RedV3x

Premiership Player
Dec 14, 2015
3,534
911
AFL Club
Fremantle
Who ever said that and who quoted that should do their research.

Actually you can be forgiven for not knowing the history of Campbelltown.

Campbelltown was a powerhouse in Sydney football for a period.
In fact they were so powerful that they joined the ACTFL in preference to the SFL, but travel made that a short-lived two year experiment.

It's hard to find reference to Jeffrey Edelstein. https://southwestvoice.com.au/mr-afl/
This reffence said Edelstein sponsored Campbelltown but the media at the time recorded Campbelltown
as being the first privately owned AFC with Edelstein changing the name from the Swans to his beloved "Blues".
 

Bjo187

Team Captain
Apr 30, 2020
447
562
AFL Club
Essendon
Interested in your thoughts bring back torps. Should gws be targeting the inner west a bit more to build a fan base? More anglos and afl friendly areas, I think it would be a smart strategy to build that as a core support group then easier to attract more supporters in the outer west there after (fans bring more fans).
 

Mr north man

Club Legend
Mar 12, 2016
2,086
1,485
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Who would go there
The Saints ?
North?
Let’s get Tassie in 1st
Still think a 3 team out of with WA or QLD with be the 20th team
 

RedV3x

Premiership Player
Dec 14, 2015
3,534
911
AFL Club
Fremantle
Should gws be targeting the inner west a bit more to build a fan base?

This is what that has been happening.

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2...s-walk-tall-after-winning-over-western-sydney

" The largest AFL Primary School competition in. NSW/ACT with over 900 teams and 13,000 students. • 2,448 participants make up the 204 teams from the. 94 GWS schools that compete"

 
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Bjo187

Team Captain
Apr 30, 2020
447
562
AFL Club
Essendon
This is what that has been happening.

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2...s-walk-tall-after-winning-over-western-sydney

" The largest AFL Primary School competition in. NSW/ACT with over 900 teams and 13,000 students. • 2,448 participants make up the 204 teams from the. 94 GWS schools that compete"


That's from 2019 and the brochure before inception and doesn't mention the inner west. I'm talking of places like henson park where the swans new aflw ground is, I think the giants should be claiming those types of areas. Before anyone says it will be cannibalising the swans support, they have had the whole of sydney to themselves for decades and already have enough fans where they can afford to lose a few in the West.
 

Canberra Pear

Team Captain
Nov 26, 2016
307
377
Canberra, ACT
AFL Club
Port Adelaide
That's from 2019 and the brochure before inception and doesn't mention the inner west. I'm talking of places like henson park where the swans new aflw ground is, I think the giants should be claiming those types of areas. Before anyone says it will be cannibalising the swans support, they have had the whole of sydney to themselves for decades and already have enough fans where they can afford to lose a few in the West.

With Sydney so hard to get around, I think GWS should be putting special focus on the immediate surroundings of Homebush, and areas with easy public transport access to Olympic Park.

One of the criticisms of GWS is their crowds, and this would help grow them. And once crowds are bigger, the atmosphere is better, and they will hopefully attract more fans again. Success begets success etc.
 

RedV3x

Premiership Player
Dec 14, 2015
3,534
911
AFL Club
Fremantle
I think the giants should be claiming those types of areas.

How do you propose that GWS "claim" the inner west. ?
Australian Football has been played in the inner west since 1903.
I think people people in those areas have made their own minds up.
 

RedV3x

Premiership Player
Dec 14, 2015
3,534
911
AFL Club
Fremantle
With Sydney so hard to get around, I think GWS should be putting special focus on the immediate surroundings of Homebush, and areas with easy public transport access to Olympic Park.

IMO, that is already in play. If you're close to public transport then getting to Homebush is relatively easy.
 

Cameron_Jezza

Debutant
Sep 12, 2021
140
161
AFL Club
Geelong
This is what that has been happening.

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2...s-walk-tall-after-winning-over-western-sydney

" The largest AFL Primary School competition in. NSW/ACT with over 900 teams and 13,000 students. • 2,448 participants make up the 204 teams from the. 94 GWS schools that compete"

I think inner west is swans zone, and they aren't allowed to promote themselves in the other sydney teams area.
 

Bjo187

Team Captain
Apr 30, 2020
447
562
AFL Club
Essendon
With Sydney so hard to get around, I think GWS should be putting special focus on the immediate surroundings of Homebush, and areas with easy public transport access to Olympic Park.

One of the criticisms of GWS is their crowds, and this would help grow them. And once crowds are bigger, the atmosphere is better, and they will hopefully attract more fans again. Success begets success etc.

I think attracting supporters in areas that actually have some interest in AFL is a better starting point than heavily immigrant areas that barely know the game exists. I'd be playing a few practice matches in marrickville and the likes as well as having an in season presence at the showgrounds. It's the same as the western bulldogs who have struggled for supporters in even an AFL city, you don't try attract fans from sunshine north as your foundation, it's too much of a hard sell.
 

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