List Mgmt. AFL Draft 2021: Richmond launch next generation of premiership success with talented draft haul

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AstuteTiger

Premiership Player
Mar 22, 2009
3,981
7,014
Melbourne
AFL Club
Richmond
Richmond considered trading up the order to secure its targets — but it didn’t need to. The Tigers recruiting boss has his say on the Tigers’ talented haul.

Richmond believes it has stockpiled the elite talent to launch its next generation of premiership success after nailing its best national draft hand since 2004.

The Tigers’ attempt to defy gravity and the AFL’s punishing equalisation measures got off to a perfect start after a second straight night where the picks fell Richmond’s way.
Richmond recruiting manager Matthew Clarke said the Tigers considered trading up in the draft order to secure both Trent Cotchin clone Tyler Sonsie and Tasmanian medium defender Sam Banks but instead secured them with late 20s picks.

Lightning quick midfielder Sonie went at pick 28, with Banks (pick 29) joining Jack Riewoldt in debuting for Tasmania’s Clarence football club at the age of 15, before battling a wrist injury this year that pushed him down draft boards.

Richmond took Tyler Sonsie, Judson Clarke and Sam Banks on the second night.

Richmond took Tyler Sonsie, Judson Clarke and Sam Banks on the second night.

East Ringwood’s Judson Clarke (pick 30) is a lethal left-footed small forward coming off an ACL tear who Richmond believes could follow in the footsteps of high half forward Kane Lambert.

It came after Richmond selected intercept defender Josh Gibcus as a draft bargain at pick nine as well as clever Murray Bushrangers defender Tom Brown (pick 17) in the first round of the draft.

Not since the Tigers had five picks within the first 20 selections in the 2004 national draft have Richmond had a chance to dominate the early parts of the draft.

Clarke told the Herald Sun the Tigers had found the right blend of needs and elite talent as the club’s triple premiership stars eventually left the club.
“There are a couple of guys in Sonsie and Banks in particular who we were thinking about making enquiries about moving up the draft and the way things unfolded we got them both,” he said.

“Sonsie has had some injury issues and Covid hasn’t been good for him in terms of the structure in his fotoy and he slipped through. When he came out of the Under-16s he was potentially in the top five in the country, so he’s really talented and he’s a mad Richmond boy, so he’s super stoked.

“We addressed our needs with Gibcus and we don’t just see him as a back, we believe he and Noah Balta can be swingmen and Brown and Banks have genuine running power with aerial ability. We are really excited to fill some needs early and then get some good players in the 20s.”
Richmond and Hawthorn both launched concerted bids to secure brilliant young Subiaco midfielder Matthew Johnson at pick 21 after he was the slider of night one of the national draft.

But the Dockers eventually secured him after considering their offers to nail a trio of local talents in the wake of Adam Cerra’s departure back to Melbourne.

TIGER BARGAIN’S WARNING TO COMPETITION
Josh Gibcus has issued an ominous warning for the Tiger Army and the new-age key-forward monsters of the competition.
“Watch out guys, I’ll take down any player,” Gibcus told the Herald Sun moments after being drafted.
The high-leaping key-defender also wants to propel Richmond to its next premiership.
This confidence isn’t for show.

Gibcus, who became a Tiger with the ninth selection in the AFL Draft, walks the talk on the field.
And he is up for any challenge, highlighted by his shut-down job on the leading key-forward in the draft, Western Bulldogs father-son and No. 2 selection Sam Darcy.

Coming off a dominant six-goal haul in a Victorian trial which saw him rocket up draft boards, the red-hot Darcy was restricted to six disposals and two goals by Gibcus in the Under-19 Victorian Challenge clash in July.

Josh Gibcus has vowed to take down any player. Picture: Mark Stewart

Josh Gibcus has vowed to take down any player. Picture: Mark Stewart

The 197cm draftee attacks the ball in the air like his life depends on it, resembling All-Australian Demon Jake Lever in the NAB League for the Greater Western Victoria Rebels this season with his intercept marking prowess, remarkable spring, and speed off the mark.
The traits that can stop athletic goalkicking machines Harry McKay, Ben King and Max King in the future.

The East Point product led the NAB League for intercept marks and intercept possessions and shapes as an exciting replacement for retired three-time premiership Tiger David Astbury, another graduate from the Rebels program.
A Brisbane supporter after living in Queensland during his early life, Gibcus has kept a watchful eye on the Tigers, with members of his family following the club.

While key-position players generally take time to develop, the St Patrick’s College graduate is eager to help the Tigers win their next flag.
“I’ve been following them for quite a bit … got to watch them win a couple of flags and hopefully when I get there, I can help them win a flag,” he said.

Gibcus looms as Richmond’s [PLAYERCARD]David Astbury[/PLAYERCARD] replacement. Picture: Dylan Burns/AFL Photos via Getty Images

Gibcus looms as Richmond’s David Astbury replacement. Picture: Dylan Burns/AFL Photos via Getty Images

“I have had a dream to be in the AFL since about five years old when I started Auskick up in Queensland, and honestly just to be called out tonight by Richmond at pick nine … I’m stoked.
“I’m an athletic key-defender, I’m pretty much an intercept marking defender. I’ll bring my vertical leap, my marking ability and my ability to read the play.”
Considered by Greater Western Sydney and Gold Coast with its early selections, Gibcus looms as a value pick-up for the Tigers.

Rebels coach David Loader said Gibcus is the modern prototype key defender.
“He’s the new-age defender. If you look forward to what the gun up and coming forwards of the competition are like – Harry McKay, the two King boys, we are looking at guys who are 200cm but incredibly athletic,” Loader explained.

“He’s 197cm, he’s quick, he’s got good endurance, he’s quite agile and he’s got a massive leap. He is the perfect prototype to play on the up and coming gun forwards of the competition.
“Athletically, Josh is really, really gifted and a super exciting player.”


 

Roksman

Club Legend
Feb 12, 2012
2,834
17,534
AFL Club
Richmond
Anyone noticing a theme here?

I'll give you the tip, we were NEVER interested in Ben Hobbs.

Every single player we selected are rated Elite or Above Average for athleticism. All these players are either elite athletes or running machines with great footskills.

Nothing against Ben, but he's very one dimensional.
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YeOldTiger

67-69-73-74-80-17-19-20 Fully Vaxxed
Jul 22, 2016
4,233
15,982
AFL Club
Richmond
Richmond considered trading up the order to secure its targets — but it didn’t need to. The Tigers recruiting boss has his say on the Tigers’ talented haul.

Richmond believes it has stockpiled the elite talent to launch its next generation of premiership success after nailing its best national draft hand since 2004.

The Tigers’ attempt to defy gravity and the AFL’s punishing equalisation measures got off to a perfect start after a second straight night where the picks fell Richmond’s way.
Richmond recruiting manager Matthew Clarke said the Tigers considered trading up in the draft order to secure both Trent Cotchin clone Tyler Sonsie and Tasmanian medium defender Sam Banks but instead secured them with late 20s picks.

Lightning quick midfielder Sonie went at pick 28, with Banks (pick 29) joining Jack Riewoldt in debuting for Tasmania’s Clarence football club at the age of 15, before battling a wrist injury this year that pushed him down draft boards.

Richmond took Tyler Sonsie, Judson Clarke and Sam Banks on the second night.

Richmond took Tyler Sonsie, Judson Clarke and Sam Banks on the second night.

East Ringwood’s Judson Clarke (pick 30) is a lethal left-footed small forward coming off an ACL tear who Richmond believes could follow in the footsteps of high half forward Kane Lambert.

It came after Richmond selected intercept defender Josh Gibcus as a draft bargain at pick nine as well as clever Murray Bushrangers defender Tom Brown (pick 17) in the first round of the draft.

Not since the Tigers had five picks within the first 20 selections in the 2004 national draft have Richmond had a chance to dominate the early parts of the draft.

Clarke told the Herald Sun the Tigers had found the right blend of needs and elite talent as the club’s triple premiership stars eventually left the club.
“There are a couple of guys in Sonsie and Banks in particular who we were thinking about making enquiries about moving up the draft and the way things unfolded we got them both,” he said.

“Sonsie has had some injury issues and Covid hasn’t been good for him in terms of the structure in his fotoy and he slipped through. When he came out of the Under-16s he was potentially in the top five in the country, so he’s really talented and he’s a mad Richmond boy, so he’s super stoked.

“We addressed our needs with Gibcus and we don’t just see him as a back, we believe he and Noah Balta can be swingmen and Brown and Banks have genuine running power with aerial ability. We are really excited to fill some needs early and then get some good players in the 20s.”
Richmond and Hawthorn both launched concerted bids to secure brilliant young Subiaco midfielder Matthew Johnson at pick 21 after he was the slider of night one of the national draft.

But the Dockers eventually secured him after considering their offers to nail a trio of local talents in the wake of Adam Cerra’s departure back to Melbourne.

TIGER BARGAIN’S WARNING TO COMPETITION
Josh Gibcus has issued an ominous warning for the Tiger Army and the new-age key-forward monsters of the competition.
“Watch out guys, I’ll take down any player,” Gibcus told the Herald Sun moments after being drafted.
The high-leaping key-defender also wants to propel Richmond to its next premiership.
This confidence isn’t for show.

Gibcus, who became a Tiger with the ninth selection in the AFL Draft, walks the talk on the field.
And he is up for any challenge, highlighted by his shut-down job on the leading key-forward in the draft, Western Bulldogs father-son and No. 2 selection Sam Darcy.

Coming off a dominant six-goal haul in a Victorian trial which saw him rocket up draft boards, the red-hot Darcy was restricted to six disposals and two goals by Gibcus in the Under-19 Victorian Challenge clash in July.

Josh Gibcus has vowed to take down any player. Picture: Mark Stewart

Josh Gibcus has vowed to take down any player. Picture: Mark Stewart

The 197cm draftee attacks the ball in the air like his life depends on it, resembling All-Australian Demon Jake Lever in the NAB League for the Greater Western Victoria Rebels this season with his intercept marking prowess, remarkable spring, and speed off the mark.
The traits that can stop athletic goalkicking machines Harry McKay, Ben King and Max King in the future.

The East Point product led the NAB League for intercept marks and intercept possessions and shapes as an exciting replacement for retired three-time premiership Tiger David Astbury, another graduate from the Rebels program.
A Brisbane supporter after living in Queensland during his early life, Gibcus has kept a watchful eye on the Tigers, with members of his family following the club.

While key-position players generally take time to develop, the St Patrick’s College graduate is eager to help the Tigers win their next flag.
“I’ve been following them for quite a bit … got to watch them win a couple of flags and hopefully when I get there, I can help them win a flag,” he said.

Gibcus looms as Richmond’s David Astbury replacement. Picture: Dylan Burns/AFL Photos via Getty Images

Gibcus looms as Richmond’s David Astbury replacement. Picture: Dylan Burns/AFL Photos via Getty Images

“I have had a dream to be in the AFL since about five years old when I started Auskick up in Queensland, and honestly just to be called out tonight by Richmond at pick nine … I’m stoked.
“I’m an athletic key-defender, I’m pretty much an intercept marking defender. I’ll bring my vertical leap, my marking ability and my ability to read the play.”
Considered by Greater Western Sydney and Gold Coast with its early selections, Gibcus looms as a value pick-up for the Tigers.

Rebels coach David Loader said Gibcus is the modern prototype key defender.
“He’s the new-age defender. If you look forward to what the gun up and coming forwards of the competition are like – Harry McKay, the two King boys, we are looking at guys who are 200cm but incredibly athletic,” Loader explained.

“He’s 197cm, he’s quick, he’s got good endurance, he’s quite agile and he’s got a massive leap. He is the perfect prototype to play on the up and coming gun forwards of the competition.
“Athletically, Josh is really, really gifted and a super exciting player.”


So, what he's saying is they're moving Balta forward
 

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fargothegreat

It's time for Tasmania to join the AFL.
Oct 8, 2011
6,428
17,174
Hobart
AFL Club
Richmond
So, what he's saying is they're moving Balta forward
I reckon we will start Gibcus off up forward. Backline is a bit crowded with Funky and Biggy, and those boys (Biggy especially) probably need a fair crack at being the key talls down back so we know whether they've got what it takes to be AFL players.
 

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