Competitions All Time Draft - Vote For The Best Team

Who Has The Best Team


  • Total voters
    14
  • Poll closed .

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Wacky Tiger

Parmy
Aug 26, 2004
27,335
45,615
Country SA
AFL Club
Richmond
Other Teams
Fighting Furies, Sturt, Rockets
Ive learnt 3 things whilst doing this draft

1. Never ever participate in a all time draft in December. Far too busy to be researching past greats of our club.

2. I dont know anywhere as much as i should on the history of our club. Lack of research time and knowledge in the history have left my team a little short

3. I got Dusty so who cares. I win 🤣
 

Barunga Bullet

The GOAT
May 8, 2019
587
2,425
AFL Club
Richmond
Ive learnt 3 things whilst doing this draft

1. Never ever participate in a all time draft in December. Far too busy to be researching past greats of our club.

2. I dont know anywhere as much as i should on the history of our club. Lack of research time and knowledge in the history have left my team a little short

3. I got Dusty so who cares. I win 🤣
so seeing as its your turn I guess you're taking Ben Lennon and Corey Ellis?
Who's up now? :tearsofjoy:
 

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Picks 180 & 181 New

Wacky Tiger

Parmy
Aug 26, 2004
27,335
45,615
Country SA
AFL Club
Richmond
Other Teams
Fighting Furies, Sturt, Rockets
179. Bill Perkins

45ebf.PerkinsBill.PNG


Bill, or “Polly” as he is affectionately known, played across the half-back-line. Recruited from Noble Park he spent a total of 11 seasons with Richmond and was a fearless, tenacious player who could always be relied upon for his total commitment. He was a member of the 1943 Premiership side and the 1944 Grand Final side. He played for Victoria once and was awarded Life Membership in 1949. He won the Most Determined award in 1943 and 1948. After leaving Richmond, he coached VFA team Brighton for three seasons. He later joined Radio 3AW where he spent 29 years covering football, as “an-around-the-grounds” man. He is still involved with the Richmond Former Players and Officials. Originally born in England, Bill is a retired production manager and now lives in the southern suburbs.


180. Geoff Spring

3a79261d5289ff69fbf859ce22658ab585d4a405.jpg


Geoff was a fine wingman who gave Richmond great service. Recruited from Williamstown he was an elusive player who had the knack of being able to find open space and then run with the ball. He had a great leap, was a strong mark and was also a long kick. He won the Best First Year Player award in 1948, the Best and Fairest award in 1949 and finished second in 1954. Between 1951 and 1956 he played in 82 consecutive games. He represented Victoria four times and was awarded Life Membership in 1957. He later served on the Richmond Committee. Geoff served in the R.A.A.F during the Second World War and also played in the Service's Football competition. Whilst he was playing in the Services competition he was spotted by former Collingwood Champion full-forward Ron Todd who was then playing for Williamstown. It was Todd's influence that saw Geoff join Williamstown after the war. Away from football he was a champion middle-distance runner, winning the 880 yards at Bendigo in 1949, and the 600 yards at Stawell in 1950.



Wackys Best 22

FB:
Tom Hafey - Barry Richardson - Dylan Grimes
HB:
Jayden Short - Gordon Strang - Jamie Tape
C:
Shaun Grigg - Jack Graham - Brandon Ellis
HF:
Matthew Rogers - Rex Hunt - Dustin Martin
FF:
Ted Langridge - Doug Strang - Neil Balme
Foll:
Roy Wright - Kane Johnson - Craig Lambert
Int:
Jason Castagna - Bill Perkins - Geoff Spring - ???

richoatthedisco
 
Pick 182 New

richoatthedisco

Dude, I go for Richmond
Jun 18, 2007
24,874
45,630
Top of the tree
AFL Club
Richmond
Other Teams
#VICBIAS
Damn, Spring was next on my list!

Frank Harley.

1639707765294.png


Frank was a champion utility who could play in defence, on the wing or as a half-forward. He was a versatile player who showed great determination and stamina combined with a touch of class. He was one of Richmond’s leading players during the 1920 and 1921 Premiership years. He represented Victoria three times and was awarded Life Membership in 1924. After leaving Richmond, he adapted to the full-forward position with great success kicking 273 in four seasons firstly with Prahran and then Alphington. An engineer by trade, he served in The Royal Australian Navy during the First World War. For this reason he played only 16 games in his first five seasons. - tigerlandarchive

Total Games: 114
Total Goals: 66

Honours: Premiership 1920-21, Victorian Representative Team 1921-22 Games 3.

Tiger_Of_Old
 

Tiger_Of_Old

🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆
Nov 23, 2000
49,731
104,424
Country Victoria
AFL Club
Richmond
Bernard Vincent Herbert (20 February 1889 – 14 December 1949)[2] was an Australian rules footballer who played in the VFL between 1909 and 1921 for the Richmond Football Club. He served as Richmond's President from 1932 to 1935 and again in 1939.

Barney Herbert
Personal information
Playing career1
Career highlights
Barney Herbert 1910.jpg
Herbert in 1910
Full nameBernard Vincent Herbert
Date of birth20 February 1889
Place of birthCollingwood, Victoria
Date of death14 December 1949 (aged 60)
Place of deathCoburg, Victoria
Original team(s)Collingwood Trades/Beverley FC
Height188 cm (6 ft 2 in)
Weight95.5 kg (211 lb)
YearsClubGames (Goals)
1909–1921Richmond192 (90)[1]
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1921.
  • Richmond Premiership Player 1920, 1921
  • Interstate Games:- 4
  • Richmond – Hall of Fame – inducted 2004
Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com
He later became an inspector in the Victorian Police Force, and was awarded the 'Valour' award for bravery while on duty.

Barunga Bullet
 
Pick 184 New

Barunga Bullet

The GOAT
May 8, 2019
587
2,425
AFL Club
Richmond
Percy Maybury
Games - 128
Goals - 61
Richmond Captain/Coach - 1917


Having played with Richmond Boys and Yarra Park Percy Maybury made his League debut with Richmond in 1910. He continued with the Wasps until the 1919 grand final, by which time he had played 128 games and kicked 61 goals. It was said of him that, over the course of his entire VFL career, he had played in every position on the field except ruck. However, far and away the majority of his football was played either in the centre or on a half forward flank. He was an exceptionally creative player who kicked both long and accurately with either foot.

In the aforementioned 1919 grand final - Richmond’s first in the VFL - Maybury captained his side to a respectable 25 point loss against Collingwood. He was actually deputising for William Thomas who had been elected captain only to break his leg in round thirteen.



Barunga Bullets Team
B: M. Malthouse -T. Chaplin - K. O'Neill
HB: J. Bowden - J. Jess - K. Morris
C: D. Clay - I. Stewart - G. Tivendale
HF: N. Daffy - M. Richardson - P. Egan
F: J. Hutchinson - T. Lynch - J. O'Rourke
FOL: G. Dear- N. Foley - J. Annear
IC: J. Caddy - B. Holland - P. Maybury - xx


richard parker
 

_RT_

2017 2019 2020
Sep 17, 2006
40,428
67,210
Southern Stand Punt Road End
AFL Club
Richmond
Other Teams
Furies Premiers 2010
Bernard Vincent Herbert (20 February 1889 – 14 December 1949)[2] was an Australian rules footballer who played in the VFL between 1909 and 1921 for the Richmond Football Club. He served as Richmond's President from 1932 to 1935 and again in 1939.

Career highlights
Playing career1
Personal information
Barney Herbert
Barney Herbert 1910.jpg
Herbert in 1910
Full nameBernard Vincent Herbert
Date of birth20 February 1889
Place of birthCollingwood, Victoria
Date of death14 December 1949 (aged 60)
Place of deathCoburg, Victoria
Original team(s)Collingwood Trades/Beverley FC
Height188 cm (6 ft 2 in)
Weight95.5 kg (211 lb)
YearsClubGames (Goals)
1909–1921Richmond192 (90)[1]
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1921.
  • Richmond Premiership Player 1920, 1921
  • Interstate Games:- 4
  • Richmond – Hall of Fame – inducted 2004
Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com
He later became an inspector in the Victorian Police Force, and was awarded the 'Valour' award for bravery while on duty.

Barunga Bullet
Already been picked
 

peterbuch74

Premium Gold
Oct 10, 2007
5,446
10,194
Punt Rd Oval, Tigerland
AFL Club
Richmond
Other Teams
Denver Broncos, Liverpool
Bernard Vincent Herbert (20 February 1889 – 14 December 1949)[2] was an Australian rules footballer who played in the VFL between 1909 and 1921 for the Richmond Football Club. He served as Richmond's President from 1932 to 1935 and again in 1939.

Career highlights
Playing career1
Personal information
Barney Herbert
Barney Herbert 1910.jpg
Herbert in 1910
Full nameBernard Vincent Herbert
Date of birth20 February 1889
Place of birthCollingwood, Victoria
Date of death14 December 1949 (aged 60)
Place of deathCoburg, Victoria
Original team(s)Collingwood Trades/Beverley FC
Height188 cm (6 ft 2 in)
Weight95.5 kg (211 lb)
YearsClubGames (Goals)
1909–1921Richmond192 (90)[1]
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1921.
  • Richmond Premiership Player 1920, 1921
  • Interstate Games:- 4
  • Richmond – Hall of Fame – inducted 2004
Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com
He later became an inspector in the Victorian Police Force, and was awarded the 'Valour' award for bravery while on duty.

Barunga Bullet

Picked him up back in round 19... pick again matey
 

Tiger_Of_Old

🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆
Nov 23, 2000
49,731
104,424
Country Victoria
AFL Club
Richmond
Michael Patterson (7 January 1941 – 16 April 2002) was an Australian rules footballer and coach. Affectionately known as the "Swamp Fox", Patterson was a premiership ruckman with the Richmond Football Club in 1967, and also captain/coach of the 1972 Australian Champions, the North Adelaide Football Club.

Career highlights
Coaching career
Playing career1
Personal information
Mike Patterson
Full nameMichael Forster Patterson[1]
Date of birth7 January 1941
Date of death16 April 2002 (aged 61)
Original team(s)Mirboo North
Height193 cm (6 ft 4 in)
Weight96 kg (212 lb)
YearsClubGames (Goals)
1959–1969Richmond152 (73)
1970–1973North Adelaide52 (49)
Total204 (122)
YearsClubGames (W–L–D)
1970–1977North Adelaide176 (97–78–1)
1978–1980St Kilda46 (14–31–1)
1981–1983Frankston (VFA)55 (25–29–1)
1984Richmond22 (10–12–0)
Total299 (146–150–3)
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1984.
Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com
 
Pick 185 New

richard parker

Team Captain
Feb 11, 2016
387
1,383
Pacific Ocean
AFL Club
Richmond
Pick 185 - Dave Cuzens

1639728029391.png


A rugged and determined defender who won back to back Best and Fairests in 1958 and 1959. He was vice captain in 1960 and 1961 and represented Victoria four times.


Richard Parker's Team
B: Martin Bolger - Scott Turner - Nathan Broad
HB: Basil McCormack - Dave Cuzens - Liam Baker
C: Henry Colden Harrison - Trent Cotchin - Allan Geddes
HF: Brett Deledio - Michael Pickering - Sydney Stack
F: Billy Brown - Jeff Hogg - Maurie Hunter
Fol: Toby Nankervis - Wayne Campbell - Shane Edwards
IC: N.Crowe - Peter "Whoosa" Welsh - Bill Cosgrove - xx

peterbuch74 is next
 

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richoatthedisco

Dude, I go for Richmond
Jun 18, 2007
24,874
45,630
Top of the tree
AFL Club
Richmond
Other Teams
#VICBIAS
Michael Patterson (7 January 1941 – 16 April 2002) was an Australian rules footballer and coach. Affectionately known as the "Swamp Fox", Patterson was a premiership ruckman with the Richmond Football Club in 1967, and also captain/coach of the 1972 Australian Champions, the North Adelaide Football Club.

Mike Patterson
Personal information
Playing career1
Coaching career
Career highlights
Full nameMichael Forster Patterson[1]
Date of birth7 January 1941
Date of death16 April 2002 (aged 61)
Original team(s)Mirboo North
Height193 cm (6 ft 4 in)
Weight96 kg (212 lb)
YearsClubGames (Goals)
1959–1969Richmond152 (73)
1970–1973North Adelaide52 (49)
Total204 (122)
YearsClubGames (W–L–D)
1970–1977North Adelaide176 (97–78–1)
1978–1980St Kilda46 (14–31–1)
1981–1983Frankston (VFA)55 (25–29–1)
1984Richmond22 (10–12–0)
Total299 (146–150–3)
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1984.
Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com
He's gone too, mate.
 
Pick 183 New

Tiger_Of_Old

🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆
Nov 23, 2000
49,731
104,424
Country Victoria
AFL Club
Richmond
3rd time lucky

Craig McKellar.
1639782520687.png


Date of Birth:
08/12/1949
Height: 196cm ( 6-5 )
Weight: 93 kg ( 14-9 )
Guernsey: 9
Debut: 03/07/1971, Round 14, St Kilda
Last Game: 06/09/1975, Round EF, Collingwood


RICHMOND SENIORS
Seasons:
1971-75
Total Games: 96
Total Goals: 25

Honours: Premiership 1973, Victorian Representative Team 1975 Games 1.

B:Bond,Balta,Strachan
HB:Terry Smith,Perry,Fowler
C:McIntosh,Knights,Pickett
HF:Brown,Vickery,Oppy
F:Bartlett,Roberts,Bolton
Foll:Lee,Broderick,Cousins
I/C:Tempany,Ronaldson/McKellar/xxxx
 
Last edited:

Phar Ace

Premium Platinum
Feb 9, 2017
8,152
15,829
Sunshine Coast
AFL Club
Richmond
Other Teams
Brisbane Bullets, Firebirds
179. Bill Perkins

45ebf.PerkinsBill.PNG


Bill, or “Polly” as he is affectionately known, played across the half-back-line. Recruited from Noble Park he spent a total of 11 seasons with Richmond and was a fearless, tenacious player who could always be relied upon for his total commitment. He was a member of the 1943 Premiership side and the 1944 Grand Final side. He played for Victoria once and was awarded Life Membership in 1949. He won the Most Determined award in 1943 and 1948. After leaving Richmond, he coached VFA team Brighton for three seasons. He later joined Radio 3AW where he spent 29 years covering football, as “an-around-the-grounds” man. He is still involved with the Richmond Former Players and Officials. Originally born in England, Bill is a retired production manager and now lives in the southern suburbs.


180. Geoff Spring

3a79261d5289ff69fbf859ce22658ab585d4a405.jpg


Geoff was a fine wingman who gave Richmond great service. Recruited from Williamstown he was an elusive player who had the knack of being able to find open space and then run with the ball. He had a great leap, was a strong mark and was also a long kick. He won the Best First Year Player award in 1948, the Best and Fairest award in 1949 and finished second in 1954. Between 1951 and 1956 he played in 82 consecutive games. He represented Victoria four times and was awarded Life Membership in 1957. He later served on the Richmond Committee. Geoff served in the R.A.A.F during the Second World War and also played in the Service's Football competition. Whilst he was playing in the Services competition he was spotted by former Collingwood Champion full-forward Ron Todd who was then playing for Williamstown. It was Todd's influence that saw Geoff join Williamstown after the war. Away from football he was a champion middle-distance runner, winning the 880 yards at Bendigo in 1949, and the 600 yards at Stawell in 1950.



Wackys Best 22

FB:
Tom Hafey - Barry Richardson - Dylan Grimes
HB:
Jayden Short - Gordon Strang - Jamie Tape
C:
Shaun Grigg - Jack Graham - Brandon Ellis
HF:
Matthew Rogers - Rex Hunt - Dustin Martin
FF:
Ted Langridge - Doug Strang - Neil Balme
Foll:
Roy Wright - Kane Johnson - Craig Lambert
Int:
Jason Castagna - Bill Perkins - Geoff Spring - ???

richoatthedisco

Geoff Spring is a very good choice!!!!
 

Phar Ace

Premium Platinum
Feb 9, 2017
8,152
15,829
Sunshine Coast
AFL Club
Richmond
Other Teams
Brisbane Bullets, Firebirds
Pick 185 - Dave Cuzens

View attachment 1299070

A rugged and determined defender who won back to back Best and Fairests in 1958 and 1959. He was vice captain in 1960 and 1961 and represented Victoria four times.


Richard Parker's Team
B: Martin Bolger - Scott Turner - Nathan Broad
HB: Basil McCormack - Dave Cuzens - Liam Baker
C: Henry Colden Harrison - Trent Cotchin - Allan Geddes
HF: Brett Deledio - Michael Pickering - Sydney Stack
F: Billy Brown - Jeff Hogg - Maurie Hunter
Fol: Toby Nankervis - Wayne Campbell - Shane Edwards
IC: N.Crowe - Peter "Whoosa" Welsh - Bill Cosgrove - xx

peterbuch74 is next

The best Cuzens we ever got!
 
Pick 186 New

peterbuch74

Premium Gold
Oct 10, 2007
5,446
10,194
Punt Rd Oval, Tigerland
AFL Club
Richmond
Other Teams
Denver Broncos, Liverpool
I’ll select MEL MORRIS next…

d00af.MMorrisRich.jpg


Mel Morris played for the Tiges between 1921 and 1926, chalking up 89 games and kicking 148 goals.
He was a member of the 1921 premiership side, was Richmonds leading goal kicker in 1924 and 1925, and the was captain coach in 1926 with a coaching record of 9 wins and 9 losses.
Mel was also the pioneer football commentator for the ABC

_RT_ back to you


Sent from my iPhone using BigFooty.com
 
Last edited:

Phar Ace

Premium Platinum
Feb 9, 2017
8,152
15,829
Sunshine Coast
AFL Club
Richmond
Other Teams
Brisbane Bullets, Firebirds
I’ll select MEL MORRIS next…

d00af.MMorrisRich.jpg


Mel Morris played for the Tiges between 1921 and 1926, chalking up 89 games and kicking 148 goals.
He was a member of the 1921 premiership side, was Richmonds leading goal kicker in 1924 and 1925, and the was captain coach in 1926 with a coaching record of 9 wins and 9 losses.
Mel was also the pioneer football commentator for the ABC

_RT_ back to you


Sent from my iPhone using BigFooty.com

Was hoping for him with my last pick you scoundrel! Bet _RT_ now takes my 2nd last ;) :whistle: You know you want Ray Hall _RT_ you know you really do......
 
Pick 187 New

_RT_

2017 2019 2020
Sep 17, 2006
40,428
67,210
Southern Stand Punt Road End
AFL Club
Richmond
Other Teams
Furies Premiers 2010
Full Name: RAY STOKES
Date of Birth: 21/05/1924
Height: 180 cm ( 5-11 )
Weight: 84 kg ( 13-3 )
Guernsey: 27
Debut: 18/05/1946, Round 5, Collingwood
Last Game: 01/09/1951, Round 18, Melbourne


RICHMOND SENIORS
Seasons:
1946-51
Total Games: 93
Total Goals: 23

Honours:



RICHMOND RESERVES
Seasons
:
Total Games:
Total Goals:

Honours
:



BIOGRAPHY
Ray played most of his football in the centre after being recruited from Tasmanian club Burnie. He was a player who excelled in heavy conditions and although not pacy, he was able to avoid tackles with perfect timing. He won Richmond's Best First Year Player award in 1946 and ran second in the 1951 Best and Fairest award. He spent six seasons with Richmond before returning to Burnie as playing-coach, retiring in 1957 with a total of 292 senior games. He was also a fine cricketer representing the Burnie Cricket Club, and also playing briefly with the Richmond Senior XI in 1946/1947. He once scored a half century for a Combined XI against a touring English team in Tasmania. He later wrote a sporting column in the Hobart Mercury newspaper which covered the North West Football Union games and results. Ray still lives in Tasmania.

Ray finished 4th, 4th, 7th, 6th, 4th & 3rd in the B&F in each year he played at the club, which is a fair effort when you see the teammates that he was playing with.

Phar Ace is on the clock
 
Pick 188 New

Phar Ace

Premium Platinum
Feb 9, 2017
8,152
15,829
Sunshine Coast
AFL Club
Richmond
Other Teams
Brisbane Bullets, Firebirds
On the clock indeed....................

Pick 187 - The Untamed Tiger (aka Frank Huggard)

This bloke you want in your team during the season - he sorts blokes out - only trouble is he gets suspended a bit. He missed out on the two premierships of 20 / 21 due to suspensions. This is a great read and gives you a bit of an idea of the skullduggery that existed back in those days:

Frank Huggard - the untamed Tiger
by Simon Huggard

Frank was recruited from Tatura in the Goulburn Valley Football League (GVFL), which at that time was a fertile recruiting ground for the Tigers and the VFL competition in general. Frank had a highly successful year in 1919 with Tatura, winning their best and fairest award. This was noticed early on in 1919 with a number of clubs chasing him, but he was recruited to Richmond by Jack Archer who was then treasurer of the Richmond Football Club. His talent was recognised with an appearance in the Tigers’ first ever genuine finals match (Frank’s third match for Richmond) and all of their finals appearances that year, including the 1919 grand final. He was one of the best players for Richmond in their preliminary and grand final teams that year, and went on to play 33 games for Richmond over six years.

Frank Huggard was part of a very solid half-back line which included himself, Max Hislop and another country player in George Parkinson who were instrumental in getting Richmond into the finals in 1919 and 1920. He played in the ruck for Richmond in later years and earned the nickname ‘The Untamed Tiger’¹ for his rugged and physical game.

One of the tragedies of Frank Huggard's career was that he was suspended for such a long period of time, which meant that he missed out on the opportunity of playing in Richmond's first two VFL Premierships. Frank did receive a VFL premiership medal for his six games for the Tigers in 1920 (medals were awarded by the club and given to all of the Richmond Football Club squad) but he was suspended for the whole of the 1920 finals series. Richmond also went on to win the premiership the following year in 1921, but Frank was suspended for the whole of that season too (more on this later).

Due to Frank being a farmer, he remained in the country at the end of the 1919 season, and at the start of the 1920 season it was uncertain whether he would be able to continue to play for the Tigers. He had only just married, his wife was expecting their first child and life on the farm was proving rather tough (so much so that the family walked off the land in 1922). The Football Record³ reported:

“What about this for club interest? One of the Richmond committee went to Tatura in the week before the season started to interview Huggard. It was doubtful whether he was coming to play for Richmond, and they wanted him badly. The committeeman found that he was farming in Toolamba, about twelve miles from Tatura. There are no trains or trams, cable or electric, nor are there cabs plying for hire between Tatura and Toolamba. Incidentally the committeeman is not a horseman. So there was nothing left for him but to pad the hoof. He looked and says the he felt like an actor stranded in a country town as he tramped along the railway track. Anyhow he arrived at the old homestead tired but game. Huggard was surprised and admired the gift of the visitor. “Well” he said. “I did not mean to go to Melbourne just yet, but as you have walked 12 miles to ask me I’m blowed if I don’t go with you now.” Nobody has yet used the aeroplane to fetch a player to a metropolitan club, so old Blossom was hitched to the jinker, and Huggard drove him in to the train and came down on Thursday before the Fitzroy match. The committeeman was in the jinker – a return walk of 12 miles would have felt like a world’s worst walking tour.”

Whilst Frank’s height and physical ability were his strengths, his rugged play often got him into hot water and, as mentioned earlier, may have cost him a place in the Tigers’ first two premierships in 1920 and 1921. Frank, at that time, played matches for Tatura in the GVFL competition on Wednesday afternoons, and then caught the train down to Melbourne to play for Richmond on Saturdays (a common occurrence for players who did not wish to move to Melbourne, such as Hugh James, Angus MacIsaac, George Parkinson, Bob McCaskill and Bill James). However, this enthusiasm for football may also have been his undoing. After playing in a spiteful match in September 1920 for Tatura against Shepparton (on a Wednesday), Frank was suspended for the rest of the 1920 season and the whole of the 1921 season (a period of 15 weeks). What this meant as well, was that he was ineligible to play for Richmond for two years. Whilst this may seem an unusually harsh penalty, it wasn’t unusual for country leagues to suspend players for a long period of time.

In fact, for years it has been speculated as to whether betting and corruption was causing a blight on football in the 1920s. There had been a scandal in 1910 in which two Carlton players were suspended for five years over allegations of bribery, and there were many cases of umpires being jostled by rowdy crowds and also receiving death threats in the 1920s over decisions made during football matches. The suspension of Frank for two seasons was certainly harsh when it was noted that his opponent (who was also reported for striking) received no penalty and went on to captain/coach Shepparton to the 1920 premiership a few weeks later. The build-up to Tatura’s match against Shepparton (their second-last match of the season) was very intense because Tatura had to win the match to remain in the top four and be eligible for the finals. There was a lot of speculation during the week about how Frank Huggard, Tatura’s best player, could be curbed during the match. Whilst the previous match between the clubs had been played with a lot of mutual respect and fairness, there was a fierce rivalry between the two clubs, with the last match in 1919 between the clubs being a very rough affair. There were also rumours about players being bribed and receiving threats. This was not new. Two weeks before the finals in 1919, Tatura beat Kyabram by three points in a very exciting match. After this game, it was revealed that the umpire, Nugent, had been offered a bribe (to allow Tatura to win) by a couple of men in Tatura, whilst passing through there on the way to Kyabram.⁶ Nothing resulted from the incident, but it did outline the fact that bribery was a problem due to illegal betting on matches in the GVFL.

The rumours at the time said that the delegates of the GVFL were bribed to get rid of Frank Huggard. Whilst this is a very extreme viewpoint, it is certain that Frank was the victim of a rather amateurish and not impartial hearing procedure where even members of the general public were called forward to give evidence.⁸ This tragically ended any chances of him playing in Richmond’s first two premierships, but he was rewarded, with a premiership medallion for playing during the 1920 premiership year, and joined the Richmond team on their end of year trip to Tasmania.

Frank’s problems with suspension also followed him into his VFL career. In 1923, Richmond had a very poor year, only winning four matches and narrowly avoiding the wooden spoon by one game. In the second-last round, the Tigers were playing South Melbourne and Frank was involved in some very tight tussles in the ruck against South’s star Roy Cazaly. After warning Cazaly not to continue with the rough tactics, Frank decided he’d had enough and struck Cazaly which knocked him to the ground and, according to Frank, caused Cazaly to be taken out of the ruck and propped up against one of the goal posts in a bit of a dazed state, from where he kicked two of his five goals for the match. Frank was suspended for six weeks for striking and Cazaly was found not guilty after being reported for retaliating. This injury to Cazaly forced him to have to cover one of his eyes with a patch during a crucial match the following week which South had to win to make it into the finals. It has often been reported that Cazaly played brilliantly, despite not being able to see properly and led the ‘Bloods’ into the finals, where they finished third.⁹

Frank’s exploits also extended to other fields. He was a member of the famous Light Horse regiments which fought in Egypt and also fought in Europe on the Western Front in 1918, where he won the Military Medal. Frank's military career was cut short due to being injured by mustard gas. This gassing episode may have saved his life though, as less than four weeks after being repatriated to hospital, in August 1918, almost 25% of the his battalion (103 men) were killed in one night during fighting on the front line. The injury to his lungs caused him problems for the rest of his life, despite playing football, working as a farmer, road contractor and tramways labourer.

B: D Astbury F.Swift R.Dean
HB: D.Rowe D.Minogue(c) G.Burgin
C: S.Maxfield M Rioli Snr L.Merrett
HF: N.Roberts P.Guinane E.Zschech
F: R.Bawden R.McLean J.Titus
FOL: M.Green T.Free R.Martin
INT: G.Bayliss R.Durham F.Huggard xxxxxxxx


Your go tiger_tough
 
Last edited:
Apr 27, 2014
23,780
46,326
The Funny Farm Lakes Entrance
AFL Club
Richmond
Other Teams
The Fanboi Farters
On the clock indeed....................

Pick 187 - The Untamed Tiger (aka Frank Huggard)

This bloke you want in your team during the season - he sorts blokes out - only trouble is he gets suspended a bit. He missed out on the two premierships of 20 / 21 due to suspensions. This is a great read and gives you a bit of an idea of the skullduggery that existed back in those days:

Frank Huggard - the untamed Tiger
by Simon Huggard

Frank was recruited from Tatura in the Goulburn Valley Football League (GVFL), which at that time was a fertile recruiting ground for the Tigers and the VFL competition in general. Frank had a highly successful year in 1919 with Tatura, winning their best and fairest award. This was noticed early on in 1919 with a number of clubs chasing him, but he was recruited to Richmond by Jack Archer who was then treasurer of the Richmond Football Club. His talent was recognised with an appearance in the Tigers’ first ever genuine finals match (Frank’s third match for Richmond) and all of their finals appearances that year, including the 1919 grand final. He was one of the best players for Richmond in their preliminary and grand final teams that year, and went on to play 33 games for Richmond over six years.

Frank Huggard was part of a very solid half-back line which included himself, Max Hislop and another country player in George Parkinson who were instrumental in getting Richmond into the finals in 1919 and 1920. He played in the ruck for Richmond in later years and earned the nickname ‘The Untamed Tiger’¹ for his rugged and physical game.

One of the tragedies of Frank Huggard's career was that he was suspended for such a long period of time, which meant that he missed out on the opportunity of playing in Richmond's first two VFL Premierships. Frank did receive a VFL premiership medal for his six games for the Tigers in 1920 (medals were awarded by the club and given to all of the Richmond Football Club squad) but he was suspended for the whole of the 1920 finals series. Richmond also went on to win the premiership the following year in 1921, but Frank was suspended for the whole of that season too (more on this later).

Due to Frank being a farmer, he remained in the country at the end of the 1919 season, and at the start of the 1920 season it was uncertain whether he would be able to continue to play for the Tigers. He had only just married, his wife was expecting their first child and life on the farm was proving rather tough (so much so that the family walked off the land in 1922). The Football Record³ reported:

“What about this for club interest? One of the Richmond committee went to Tatura in the week before the season started to interview Huggard. It was doubtful whether he was coming to play for Richmond, and they wanted him badly. The committeeman found that he was farming in Toolamba, about twelve miles from Tatura. There are no trains or trams, cable or electric, nor are there cabs plying for hire between Tatura and Toolamba. Incidentally the committeeman is not a horseman. So there was nothing left for him but to pad the hoof. He looked and says the he felt like an actor stranded in a country town as he tramped along the railway track. Anyhow he arrived at the old homestead tired but game. Huggard was surprised and admired the gift of the visitor. “Well” he said. “I did not mean to go to Melbourne just yet, but as you have walked 12 miles to ask me I’m blowed if I don’t go with you now.” Nobody has yet used the aeroplane to fetch a player to a metropolitan club, so old Blossom was hitched to the jinker, and Huggard drove him in to the train and came down on Thursday before the Fitzroy match. The committeeman was in the jinker – a return walk of 12 miles would have felt like a world’s worst walking tour.”

Whilst Frank’s height and physical ability were his strengths, his rugged play often got him into hot water and, as mentioned earlier, may have cost him a place in the Tigers’ first two premierships in 1920 and 1921. Frank, at that time, played matches for Tatura in the GVFL competition on Wednesday afternoons, and then caught the train down to Melbourne to play for Richmond on Saturdays (a common occurrence for players who did not wish to move to Melbourne, such as Hugh James, Angus MacIsaac, George Parkinson, Bob McCaskill and Bill James). However, this enthusiasm for football may also have been his undoing. After playing in a spiteful match in September 1920 for Tatura against Shepparton (on a Wednesday), Frank was suspended for the rest of the 1920 season and the whole of the 1921 season (a period of 15 weeks). What this meant as well, was that he was ineligible to play for Richmond for two years. Whilst this may seem an unusually harsh penalty, it wasn’t unusual for country leagues to suspend players for a long period of time.

In fact, for years it has been speculated as to whether betting and corruption was causing a blight on football in the 1920s. There had been a scandal in 1910 in which two Carlton players were suspended for five years over allegations of bribery, and there were many cases of umpires being jostled by rowdy crowds and also receiving death threats in the 1920s over decisions made during football matches. The suspension of Frank for two seasons was certainly harsh when it was noted that his opponent (who was also reported for striking) received no penalty and went on to captain/coach Shepparton to the 1920 premiership a few weeks later. The build-up to Tatura’s match against Shepparton (their second-last match of the season) was very intense because Tatura had to win the match to remain in the top four and be eligible for the finals. There was a lot of speculation during the week about how Frank Huggard, Tatura’s best player, could be curbed during the match. Whilst the previous match between the clubs had been played with a lot of mutual respect and fairness, there was a fierce rivalry between the two clubs, with the last match in 1919 between the clubs being a very rough affair. There were also rumours about players being bribed and receiving threats. This was not new. Two weeks before the finals in 1919, Tatura beat Kyabram by three points in a very exciting match. After this game, it was revealed that the umpire, Nugent, had been offered a bribe (to allow Tatura to win) by a couple of men in Tatura, whilst passing through there on the way to Kyabram.⁶ Nothing resulted from the incident, but it did outline the fact that bribery was a problem due to illegal betting on matches in the GVFL.

The rumours at the time said that the delegates of the GVFL were bribed to get rid of Frank Huggard. Whilst this is a very extreme viewpoint, it is certain that Frank was the victim of a rather amateurish and not impartial hearing procedure where even members of the general public were called forward to give evidence.⁸ This tragically ended any chances of him playing in Richmond’s first two premierships, but he was rewarded, with a premiership medallion for playing during the 1920 premiership year, and joined the Richmond team on their end of year trip to Tasmania.

Frank’s problems with suspension also followed him into his VFL career. In 1923, Richmond had a very poor year, only winning four matches and narrowly avoiding the wooden spoon by one game. In the second-last round, the Tigers were playing South Melbourne and Frank was involved in some very tight tussles in the ruck against South’s star Roy Cazaly. After warning Cazaly not to continue with the rough tactics, Frank decided he’d had enough and struck Cazaly which knocked him to the ground and, according to Frank, caused Cazaly to be taken out of the ruck and propped up against one of the goal posts in a bit of a dazed state, from where he kicked two of his five goals for the match. Frank was suspended for six weeks for striking and Cazaly was found not guilty after being reported for retaliating. This injury to Cazaly forced him to have to cover one of his eyes with a patch during a crucial match the following week which South had to win to make it into the finals. It has often been reported that Cazaly played brilliantly, despite not being able to see properly and led the ‘Bloods’ into the finals, where they finished third.⁹

Frank’s exploits also extended to other fields. He was a member of the famous Light Horse regiments which fought in Egypt and also fought in Europe on the Western Front in 1918, where he won the Military Medal. Frank's military career was cut short due to being injured by mustard gas. This gassing episode may have saved his life though, as less than four weeks after being repatriated to hospital, in August 1918, almost 25% of the his battalion (103 men) were killed in one night during fighting on the front line. The injury to his lungs caused him problems for the rest of his life, despite playing football, working as a farmer, road contractor and tramways labourer.

B: D Astbury F.Swift R.Dean
HB: D.Rowe D.Minogue(c) G.Burgin
C: S.Maxfield M Rioli Snr L.Merrett
HF: N.Roberts P.Guinane E.Zschech
F: R.Bawden R.McLean J.Titus
FOL: M.Green T.Free R.Martin
INT: G.Bayliss R.Durham F.Huggard xxxxxxxx


Your go tiger_tough
Thanks PA as that was probably one of the best reads and incite on any player thus far.
 

Phar Ace

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Thanks PA as that was probably one of the best reads and incite on any player thus far.

Thanks TI, I thought it was a cracking insight. How tough were these guys, working a farm, playing competitive and bruising footy both Wednesday and Saturday. The leagues themselves were micro political and sounded very open to all sorts of skullduggery - pretty sad to miss the first 2 Premierships after playing in Richmond's first losing Grand Final and being best afield.
 
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