Science/Environment Anti-vacc Crazies at it again. Post appropriate outrage ITT

Bulldog Joe

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I can honestly never keep up with who is actually anti-vax.

Is it the far right anti-intellectia or inner-city hipster sheltered-world mums?

Or even the anti-establishment second-generation inner-city gentrification of northern-NSW coastal regional area say-no-to-fluoride-and-also-modern-dental-health crew?

I guess the only strong thread which runs between them all is all no-holds-barred embrace of ignorance.

Can’t wait for them to all complain when thier tax dollars are paying for the resulting health crisis.
Regardless of their position on the political spectrum, they are not likely to be much of a contributor to the tax dollar.
 

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Long Live HFC

Norm Smith Medallist
Oct 30, 2010
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crazy holds no political affiliation.

with that said, you tend to see more bollocks re vaccines, genetic research and health from the hippies on the left, while on the right it's more climate change and evolution. of course, there are extremists that embrace any and all "contrarian" ideas because it makes them feel special.
 

Chief

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Late to the party, but the low rates of vaccination in expensive suburbs indicates otherwise for a good portion of them.
It looks like “rich people exceptionalism” effect.

They think they have found a secret club and are protecting their kids from the diseases and possible adverse effects from vaccines.

Unfortunately once enough people are in this now un-secret club, herd immunity is broken and...


On iPhone using BigFooty.com mobile app
 

Snake_Baker

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The Unicornia Reactants
I'm no anti vaxer, but out of curiosity how much has modern sanitation improvements influenced in eradicating these as well?
All the sanitary practices in the world would not "eradicate" these bacteria.

It may stem contamination slightly, but I doubt it would be significant.
 

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sorted

Norm Smith Medallist
Aug 21, 2016
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All the sanitary practices in the world would not "eradicate" these bacteria.

It may stem contamination slightly, but I doubt it would be significant.
It's actually quite complicated. The list in the graphic has a mixture of viral and bacterial infections.

Rubella is a viral infection spread by direct contact with infectious people such as coughing or sneezing. Some bacterial infections such as Pneumococcal are also spread the same way. Washing your hands or keeping your kitchen clean will not protect you from these conditions.

Whereas Diarrhoeal disease is mainly bacterial and is responsible for killing around half a million children every year. Greater hygiene would dramatically improve the life expectancy in the third world.

The grey area is in the Western world. Some supporters of the "hygiene hypothesis" believe that increased hygiene has diminished the ability of children to acquire immunity to common ailments and led to the increase in autoimmune and allergic diseases.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2841828/
 

Grin

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An interesting article from the Medical Journal of Australia:

The same Russians trolls who interfered with the US election are also spreading misinformation about vaccines, according to research from Washington DC.

Scientists at George Washington University have recently released a study in which they found Russian trolls and bots flooding Twitter and other social media outlets as part of the immunisation debate.

The discovery was made while the scientists were researching ways to improve communication methods for American health workers.

They were amazed to find extensive deliberate misleading content being spewed online in attempts to skew the debate and dissuade consensus over vaccinations.

Further digging uncovered that several false online accounts belong to the same Russian trolls who meddled with the 2016 US election. Malware bots were also being used.

But, in further evidence of deliberate efforts to confuse the situation, the trolls tweeted both pro- and anti-vaccine content, according to the researchers.

“The vast majority of Americans believe vaccines are safe and effective, but looking at Twitter gives the impression that there is a lot of debate,” said Assistant Professor David Broniatowski of GWU.

“It turns out that many anti-vaccine tweets come from accounts whose provenance is unclear. These might be bots, human users or cyborgs – hacked accounts that are sometimes taken over by bots. Although it’s impossible to know exactly how many tweets were generated by bots and trolls, our findings suggest that a significant portion of the online discourse about vaccines may be generated by malicious actors with a range of hidden agendas.

“We started looking at the Russian trolls, because that data set became available in January. One of the first things that came out was they tweet about vaccines way more often than the average Twitter user.”

The research states that trolls tweeted on vaccines about 22 times more often than regular Twitter users.

A random sample of 1.7million tweets was collected between July 2014 and September 2017 was examined. Non-vaccination rates of children in the US is climbing.

Some of the misinformation – and deliberate lies – that are being tweeted talk of “vaccine damaged children” and a “secret government database”. Other tweets link the debate to God, race, and even animal welfare.

Click baits were also used, encouraging social media users to click on advertisements and other content, only to be diverted to malicious messaging about immunisation.

Earlier this year, Twitter deleted 3,800 accounts linked to the Russian government-backed Internet Research Agency, which is the same group researchers at GWU examined.

The researchers didn’t examine Facebook, but in the face of damming criticisms this year of the social media giant’s operations, it removed 135 accounts in April linked to the Internet Research Agency.

More recently, Facebook removed another 650 fake accounts linked to Russia and Iran that appear to have be set up purely to spread misinformation.

The study is published in the American Journal of Public Health.
 

bfff

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I wonder if it is being used to spread malware or disinformation? Is the strategy to undermine public trust in an “enemy” state’s institutions?
 

Chief

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An interesting article from the Medical Journal of Australia:

The same Russians trolls who interfered with the US election are also spreading misinformation about vaccines, according to research from Washington DC.

Scientists at George Washington University have recently released a study in which they found Russian trolls and bots flooding Twitter and other social media outlets as part of the immunisation debate.

The discovery was made while the scientists were researching ways to improve communication methods for American health workers.

They were amazed to find extensive deliberate misleading content being spewed online in attempts to skew the debate and dissuade consensus over vaccinations.

Further digging uncovered that several false online accounts belong to the same Russian trolls who meddled with the 2016 US election. Malware bots were also being used.

But, in further evidence of deliberate efforts to confuse the situation, the trolls tweeted both pro- and anti-vaccine content, according to the researchers.

“The vast majority of Americans believe vaccines are safe and effective, but looking at Twitter gives the impression that there is a lot of debate,” said Assistant Professor David Broniatowski of GWU.

“It turns out that many anti-vaccine tweets come from accounts whose provenance is unclear. These might be bots, human users or cyborgs – hacked accounts that are sometimes taken over by bots. Although it’s impossible to know exactly how many tweets were generated by bots and trolls, our findings suggest that a significant portion of the online discourse about vaccines may be generated by malicious actors with a range of hidden agendas.

“We started looking at the Russian trolls, because that data set became available in January. One of the first things that came out was they tweet about vaccines way more often than the average Twitter user.”

The research states that trolls tweeted on vaccines about 22 times more often than regular Twitter users.

A random sample of 1.7million tweets was collected between July 2014 and September 2017 was examined. Non-vaccination rates of children in the US is climbing.

Some of the misinformation – and deliberate lies – that are being tweeted talk of “vaccine damaged children” and a “secret government database”. Other tweets link the debate to God, race, and even animal welfare.

Click baits were also used, encouraging social media users to click on advertisements and other content, only to be diverted to malicious messaging about immunisation.

Earlier this year, Twitter deleted 3,800 accounts linked to the Russian government-backed Internet Research Agency, which is the same group researchers at GWU examined.

The researchers didn’t examine Facebook, but in the face of damming criticisms this year of the social media giant’s operations, it removed 135 accounts in April linked to the Internet Research Agency.

More recently, Facebook removed another 650 fake accounts linked to Russia and Iran that appear to have be set up purely to spread misinformation.

The study is published in the American Journal of Public Health.
The real question is: What do these accounts say about Flat Earth?
 

Lebbo73

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An interesting article from the Medical Journal of Australia:

The same Russians trolls who interfered with the US election are also spreading misinformation about vaccines, according to research from Washington DC.

Scientists at George Washington University have recently released a study in which they found Russian trolls and bots flooding Twitter and other social media outlets as part of the immunisation debate.

The discovery was made while the scientists were researching ways to improve communication methods for American health workers.

They were amazed to find extensive deliberate misleading content being spewed online in attempts to skew the debate and dissuade consensus over vaccinations.

Further digging uncovered that several false online accounts belong to the same Russian trolls who meddled with the 2016 US election. Malware bots were also being used.

But, in further evidence of deliberate efforts to confuse the situation, the trolls tweeted both pro- and anti-vaccine content, according to the researchers.

“The vast majority of Americans believe vaccines are safe and effective, but looking at Twitter gives the impression that there is a lot of debate,” said Assistant Professor David Broniatowski of GWU.

“It turns out that many anti-vaccine tweets come from accounts whose provenance is unclear. These might be bots, human users or cyborgs – hacked accounts that are sometimes taken over by bots. Although it’s impossible to know exactly how many tweets were generated by bots and trolls, our findings suggest that a significant portion of the online discourse about vaccines may be generated by malicious actors with a range of hidden agendas.

“We started looking at the Russian trolls, because that data set became available in January. One of the first things that came out was they tweet about vaccines way more often than the average Twitter user.”

The research states that trolls tweeted on vaccines about 22 times more often than regular Twitter users.

A random sample of 1.7million tweets was collected between July 2014 and September 2017 was examined. Non-vaccination rates of children in the US is climbing.

Some of the misinformation – and deliberate lies – that are being tweeted talk of “vaccine damaged children” and a “secret government database”. Other tweets link the debate to God, race, and even animal welfare.

Click baits were also used, encouraging social media users to click on advertisements and other content, only to be diverted to malicious messaging about immunisation.

Earlier this year, Twitter deleted 3,800 accounts linked to the Russian government-backed Internet Research Agency, which is the same group researchers at GWU examined.

The researchers didn’t examine Facebook, but in the face of damming criticisms this year of the social media giant’s operations, it removed 135 accounts in April linked to the Internet Research Agency.

More recently, Facebook removed another 650 fake accounts linked to Russia and Iran that appear to have be set up purely to spread misinformation.

The study is published in the American Journal of Public Health.
It looks like Big Pharma is getting desperate. Anytime you have to resort to propaganda is usually an acknowledgement that you’re losing the info war!
 

Cleric

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An interesting article from the Medical Journal of Australia:

The same Russians trolls who interfered with the US election are also spreading misinformation about vaccines, according to research from Washington DC.

Scientists at George Washington University have recently released a study in which they found Russian trolls and bots flooding Twitter and other social media outlets as part of the immunisation debate.

The discovery was made while the scientists were researching ways to improve communication methods for American health workers.

They were amazed to find extensive deliberate misleading content being spewed online in attempts to skew the debate and dissuade consensus over vaccinations.

Further digging uncovered that several false online accounts belong to the same Russian trolls who meddled with the 2016 US election. Malware bots were also being used.

But, in further evidence of deliberate efforts to confuse the situation, the trolls tweeted both pro- and anti-vaccine content, according to the researchers.

“The vast majority of Americans believe vaccines are safe and effective, but looking at Twitter gives the impression that there is a lot of debate,” said Assistant Professor David Broniatowski of GWU.

“It turns out that many anti-vaccine tweets come from accounts whose provenance is unclear. These might be bots, human users or cyborgs – hacked accounts that are sometimes taken over by bots. Although it’s impossible to know exactly how many tweets were generated by bots and trolls, our findings suggest that a significant portion of the online discourse about vaccines may be generated by malicious actors with a range of hidden agendas.

“We started looking at the Russian trolls, because that data set became available in January. One of the first things that came out was they tweet about vaccines way more often than the average Twitter user.”

The research states that trolls tweeted on vaccines about 22 times more often than regular Twitter users.

A random sample of 1.7million tweets was collected between July 2014 and September 2017 was examined. Non-vaccination rates of children in the US is climbing.

Some of the misinformation – and deliberate lies – that are being tweeted talk of “vaccine damaged children” and a “secret government database”. Other tweets link the debate to God, race, and even animal welfare.

Click baits were also used, encouraging social media users to click on advertisements and other content, only to be diverted to malicious messaging about immunisation.

Earlier this year, Twitter deleted 3,800 accounts linked to the Russian government-backed Internet Research Agency, which is the same group researchers at GWU examined.

The researchers didn’t examine Facebook, but in the face of damming criticisms this year of the social media giant’s operations, it removed 135 accounts in April linked to the Internet Research Agency.

More recently, Facebook removed another 650 fake accounts linked to Russia and Iran that appear to have be set up purely to spread misinformation.

The study is published in the American Journal of Public Health.
Russia pretty much has the same vaccination schedules as other Western countries.
Why would Putin care about doing this type of thing. Really, it's silly to jump on Russia all the time.
 

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