Health Anxiety

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HARKER

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Seriously Eastern Tiger.

Just the use, honesty and well-meaning of the simplest of words can make so much difference to us beings.
We never know whether the right words could be the difference to hang on, or the wrong words be the straw to break the camels back.

Like you I got on top of severe panic attacks and they'll never bother me again.

To those that haven't yet............you will. Get the right advice and learn to develop methods to beat this demon.
You may not be laughing now but you have the ability to be able to laugh about it later. Trust yourself but do get someone on your side.
 

HARKER

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Great post Harker.

As Thoreau said 'the mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation'. Important to remember it's not your fault, and you're NOT alone.


Greater post Eastern Tiger. :thumbsu:

No one needs to be alone as lonely as it may seem at times.
It's O.K. to drop ones defences and ask, "I need a little help"

We don't have to fix everything ourselves but do trust the person you're allowing yourself to be fixed by.
Can make a lot of difference.
 

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Engimal

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Death anxiety is kicking in pretty heavily tonight. I've found that whenever I post on BigFooty about it I feel a little better so I'm hoping that'll follow through this time again.
 

TheKanga

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Death anxiety is kicking in pretty heavily tonight. I've found that whenever I post on BigFooty about it I feel a little better so I'm hoping that'll follow through this time again.

Getting things off your chest does help heaps, you are not alone.
I always have random thoughts like that ''one day i will die'' or ''eventually everyone i know will be dead''
Scares the **** out of me to be honest.
I struggle with anxiety over this sort of thing everyday.
Then i remember why waste the precious time we do have worrying about the inevitable?
Is it a particular fear or just death in general? Like i have certain ways of dying that scare me more than others.
 

Engimal

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Getting things off your chest does help heaps, you are not alone.
I always have random thoughts like that ''one day i will die'' or ''eventually everyone i know will be dead''
Scares the **** out of me to be honest.
I struggle with anxiety over this sort of thing everyday.
Then i remember why waste the precious time we do have worrying about the inevitable?
Is it a particular fear or just death in general? Like i have certain ways of dying that scare me more than others.

Just death in general, similar to the way you described. The fact that one day I'm going to die and every second I'm alive it's getting closer. My schoolwork is keeping a lot of those thoughts out but I've been terrified of dying (to the point of tears, often) since i was about 14.
 

Engimal

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I've been having a good week. I read a quote somewhere that resonated with me quite a bit. It was something along the lines of, "Death is the price we pay for the beauty that is life". It made me think that I'm pretty lucky to be alive, to be able bodied and to live in a country like Australia. If I make the most of my time here in life, perhaps I won't have to to be anxious about death because I've experienced all that I could. I'm definitely not cured but this thought's definitely made my week easier.
 

Drakescoffeecake

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Stumbled across this thread. I've been displaying physical symptoms for a few months now. Fatigue, headaches, stomach pain, chest pain and a general feeling of not being able to cope. The symptoms come and go (they completely disappear when drinking - maybe that's a sign it's mental!) but I have always brushed it off as a bug or some little virus floating around. Was shocked this week when my doctor diagnosed me with an anxiety disorder. I don't get it. I have had some pretty average moments in my life personally but so have a lot of people, work is stressful but I enjoy what I do. I'm content - financially fine, holidays booked, great social life, great friends and family - anxious about nothing. But apparently that's anxiety - you can be as happy as a pig in shite but still develop physical symptoms of anxiety. What a strange beast it is :thumbsdown:
 

rdhopkins2

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If you feel it getting the better of you, get help. Don't be ashamed of that. Too many people don't get the help they need as quickly as they need to. Don't feel like you have to go it alone.
 

MrsEddieBetts

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I guess I've had anxiety my whole life, I just didn't know what it was. My parents would describe me as 'highly strung' and it's fair to say I'm a control freak. I'm in my late 20s now. It dawned on me that I had anxiety when I was in year 11. I suffered badly from Chronic Fatigue and it became a vicious cycle of taking time off school because I was exhausted and then being too anxious to go back because I'd missed so much. I can remember my first panic attack like it was yesterday--I was at a party and all of a sudden it was like I had no control over anything around me, and it felt like I was suffocating. My heart was beating so hard you could see it through my top. I ended up crouched up in a ball on the floor of the host's laundry.

Over time I've become much better at recognising when a panic attack is coming on, and talking myself through it (not out of it--I find that it's important to let myself feel what I need to at the time). The strategy that has worked best for me is to talk, talk, talk about my anxiety. All of my friends and family know I have it, I'll tell them when I start to feel panicky, I tell them when I need space or I need to be surrounded. It's nothing to be ashamed of and it doesn't determine who I am--it's just something that I work through.
 

HARKER

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Yeah, mental demons can be a bitch as they aren't visible to the untrained eye.

Having your arm or leg in a cast or having the need for a wheelchair brings about all sorts of sympathy but having depression or suffering anxiety can often bring about alienation from even the closest of friends.

We are getting better though but it's not as easy as it should be just yet. One day though.
 

HARKER

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little graham You've cleared the post that you put up here recently and that's your business of course and not for me to re-post but there are good people around that can help. Being a little patient in finding the right person you can talk to is paramount to recovery.

It's easy when one writes it down but even some phone calls can lead you to someone who can add real value to conditions of anxiety, depression etc.
What you posted made a lot of sense and it wouldn't be the first nor the last time people were corrupted and took care of their pocket and not the patients needs.

Funny you brought me back here today because only earlier I spoke to someone who called me just after they themselves had a panic attack.
Fortunately that individual trusts me and after about half an hour on the phone we managed to half a good laugh together. I wish that I could have cuddled them but they're on the other side of the world.

Don't stop trying to find someone because there are some good professionals out there......Please do it.
 

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HARKER

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You don't understand the extent of the bigotry. Health professionals can't help, the only thing that can is justice. Only justice can remove the fraudulent lies. Until they are removed , everything snowballs if you don't lay down and shut up.

Even tried getting out of the environment, trying to use use the services that are suppose to help, encountered the same thing. I was lucky one doctor decided to do the moral thing and stop the poison. However that was a far as he could go and warned me never go near the people responsible. He clearly pointed out what psychiatry would do, if I ever went near them. He use to be one in Zimbabawe. Begged me not to believe the label and stay away. This devout muslim was quite compassionate.

When I asked him for help stopping my families attacks on me, he shrunk in his seat and shook. There was nothing he could do and was fully aware if he referred me, what would happen. His staff made my use of that practice intolerable after that. I live in a small town. 6 years later when they all fell away as my father died suddenly from a dual cancer and I was the strong one that took care of everything, they used the lies I asked help with, to attempt to silence me forever.

You're problem is you think someone can help, however when you've had your life threatened by a doctor to cover up for another, when doctors find your knowledge a threat and choose to bully you, when you try to see a psychologist to deal with the trauma from the abuse and are refused and phuqed around. You have to walkaway. To rebuild from nothing.

There's a sheila who runs a site called beyond meds, she is 100 % spot on and a remarkable lady whose suffered similar and is rebuilding by giving back.
.
I understand you're posting to others so they trust the system and I have respect you're not turning it around on me. However there will people out there like me, that need to know they're not alone, need to see acknowledgment of the dark side. I know what they have been, told, what they will be told and how the general public, centerlink ect treat them when they talk about how they have been tret. I know how they will be exploited, if they have poor support structures.

I have come to respect my anxiety, have deep feelings and respect for its role. I would share, that to stop living in the future, as you do with anxiety, is to look back in the past and work out why. I would suggest one backs their own instinct and remove all toxic people. I would suggest medication is last resort therapy. I would suggest diet and lifestyle changes. All things proven productive but denied to too many sufferers.

I know that the longer they think the services actually want to help them, the closer they are to a breakdown, where the bullying will go to intolerable levels.

Once upon a time noone believed the orphans Jimmy Saville raped s**t out of, every service provider made life harder for them.

Justice was the only medicine they needed.

You are right. I don't understand but as you say yourself, someone will.

I can though tell you that I've been close enough to others who have had the most disgusting of things brought about onto them..............and they also told me that I don't understand and they were right of course................but I did care and that was the best I had to offer.

The people I speak about have gone on to have good lives, yet one of them still opts for semi-regular counselling.............30 years on.

I don't trust systems either and I don't particularly trust man as a rule...........but there are good people out there.....really good people...somewhere.
I hope you don't give up and do find him/her/them. I really do.
 

little graham

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little graham . Being a little patient in finding the right person you can talk to is paramount to recovery.
.

Ignorance is bliss. There's a really good Australian study out of victoria about psych patients dieing 20- 30 years younger than everyone else, dieing of treatable diseases. I can tell you exactly why. Most who suffer trauma from the stigma associated are told that stigma is a paranoid delusion. This does wonders for anxiety. Yet its scientifically proven. It is really phuqing cruel and does most sufferers heads in. Doctors and psychologist repeat these lies. they say the doctor is to busy to know they're being lied to. However its law to know.
 

Golden_6

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Never been diagnosed with anything and i doubt i would have anything clinical just certain symptoms of anxiety even though i have had professional help before which helped to an extent.

I'm very anxious in social situations or any situation with others who are foreign to me. Terrible at holding a conversation with new people for whatever reason (being judged, trying to make a good impression). I consider myself quite intelligent and am completely fine around people i am comfortable with but am quite poor at responding to conversation quickly and often stumble or say something that i can't help but laugh at. Often when i receive a call from an unknown number i will ignore the call (don't ask me why, just do) and regularly show avoidance behaviours. Still working to get out of these habits.

It doesn't affect me to much at my age (20) but once i finish uni and head into the business world it will be impossible to keep up.
 

HARKER

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Never been diagnosed with anything and i doubt i would have anything clinical just certain symptoms of anxiety even though i have had professional help before which helped to an extent.

It doesn't affect me to much at my age (20) but once i finish uni and head into the business world it will be impossible to keep up.

You're only 20? You'll be fine given what you've put forward.

I was quite shy at that age and have turned out to be the most arrogant S.O.B. around now.............. :) You'll be fine and do use that intelligence.
 

mcuzzy

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Mine was at it's worst when I was 20, felt sick to my stomach, couldn't sleep, struggled to eat, didn't want to even leave the house.
 

Kram

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An annoying condition that's for sure..
 

crownie

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Had bad anxiety in my mid 20's that really became my lost years, couldn't leave the house without having my heart racing or dizzy spells.

But 5 years on i can say to those that there is hope, i had little support from anyone but overtime things have improved and i can't remember the last time i had one.

Things that improved me were eating better and looking after my body, cutting off people that brought bad energy and in the end doing what you want to do in life regardless on what advice anyone might have.
 

MrsEddieBetts

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Does anyone know what the difference is between a clinical psychologist and a psychologist?
I'm looking for some support and I've gone on the Beyond Blue website to find someone in my local area since I've just moved house, but I don't know who would be best for me to speak to.
 

vonn

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I've posted a few times in the depression thread previously, but I clicked this thread because I've always wondered between the link between the two (they seem to go hand in hand.) I don't have anxiety, but it's been relevant for the past year or so. Not for me, but for my (now) ex. I hated seeing it turn him from the happiest, most outgoing guy to who he became in parts. I don't really have anything deep or insightful to say about it, but just to remember that even in the worst moments there are people who are hurting seeing you like this, and to talk to them before it turns into something deeper. Whether it be loved ones or a professional, living that way, panic attacks or headaches won't last forever and it's important to remember that. That might sound a little cliched and pathetic, but I had depression, received professional help, and I'm better for it. Anxiety is just as much an illness and it deserves to be treated as such.
 

TheFreshBanana

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Does anyone know what the difference is between a clinical psychologist and a psychologist?
I'm looking for some support and I've gone on the Beyond Blue website to find someone in my local area since I've just moved house, but I don't know who would be best for me to speak to.
The title Psychologist is a more definitive one and specifically refers to, and can only be used by, someone who has completed a university based psychology degree. To be a Registered Psychologist, you need to have completed at least 4 years of formal university training plus have at least 2 years of supervised clinical experience. Psychologists are bound by a professional code of conduct and ethics.

Finally, a Clinical Psychologist is a psychologist who has, in addition to completing the requirements of a psychologist, also completed 2 years of formal, post-graduate (Masters level) clinical training in an accredited, university based program. Further, a clinical psychologist is required to complete 2 more years supervised clinical training as well as continuing education on an annual basis. There are also clinical psychologists who use the title "Doctor", and these highly qualified clinicians have also completed a Ph.D. in psychology or a Doctorate of Clinical Psychology (Psy.D.).

More qualifications it seems.

Not sure if a clinical psychologist can give out medication, if that was what you were looking for.
 

TheFreshBanana

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But yeah, * anxiety the little campaigner.

Seriously.

Where do I begin with this laughable turn of events?

I'm in my 3rd year of uni right now. I was diagnosed with depression in year 12, and spent a lot of my last year of high school dealing with it, and not really focusing on my studies. Of course, in turn, it also gave me anxiety regarding tests and exams.

Come first year of uni, everything was fine, I was never the greatest student, in fact, I was just learning how to study for the first time, as I had never taken it very seriously, and of course, there wasn't much opportunity to do so in year 12.

The ducked thing is, is that at the end of each of that semester, I had anxiety from exams, which in turn led to depression. I was fine throughout the year, but by the time it was to study for exams, I just crumbled.

Come second year, okay, I've identified that anxiety is the problem. I've lessened my workload by a unit as well. But still, by the time I get to study for exams, I just crumble. I think I'm doing perfectly fine, and then poof, I'm gone.

So, I'm in my 3rd year now. The unit I have failed TWICE is a big one. It's a first year subject, that doesn't allow you to progress through to the second year because its a really important unit.

I'm in my 3rd year, with 2nd year uni students, who will most likely be graduating BEFORE me. It hurts just to even think about it. i don't think I've ever been so ashamed and embarrassed of something in my life.

And here's the kicker. Because of my failings for the past 2 years, my anxiety which really only came about during exam time, has now progressed to all study in general.

Sooooo.. yeah... who knows what I'm going to do. I'm trying to beat it, get a little bit done each day, but I'm not really getting anywhere. I'm only doing 1 unit this semester, it's been 3 weeks, and I'm already really behind.

Hmmm, maybe I'll go to my GP and get some meds. I just... don't really want to have to explain why I need them, or go see a psychologist...
 

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