Any Python programmers?

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the_interloper

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I've decided to get into programming while locked down, i'm going to get a Raspberry Pi but figure I should learn how to program it.

I did a bit of C programming at uni but not much, also did a bit of microcontroller programming too, so not starting from zero.

Anyone got any tips/videos/projects they want to share?
 

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Engimal v3

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I primarily program in Python for a living. If you've worked with C (my first language as well), Python will seem like a piece of piss.
 

compact72

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Take a look at GoLang.

I'm a pho developer but starting to convert to GoLang where I can

Sent from my SM-N975F using Tapatalk
 

Caesar

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What's peoples opinions on R vs Python?
I assume the second unsaid part of that sentence is "for data and statistical work", because that's the only context the comparison makes sense.

R is great, because that's what it was designed for. A lot of complex calculations are far more elegant in R than Python. The shinyverse is far better developed than anything Python has to offer, and lets you create some fantastic visualisations.

On the other hand, Python is a lot easier to learn (particularly for someone coming from other programming languages) and (outside academia) a lot more widely known and used. As a statistical language its libraries are less mature than R, but they're perfectly adequate and improving all the time. As a language it's more versatile, easier to create stuff that needs to be put into production, and people outside the data/statistical field are going to be more comfortable with it.

If I wanted to work in data and was picking one or the other to learn today - I'd probably go with Python. The only exception would be if I was specifically planning on doing university/research work, where R is still king.

But before learning either, I'd become an SQL ninja.
 
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Cluggage

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I assume the second unsaid part of that sentence is "for data and statistical work", because that's the only context the comparison makes sense.

R is great, because that's what it was designed for. A lot of complex calculations are far more elegant in R than Python. The shinyverse is far better developed than anything Python has to offer, and lets you create some fantastic visualisations.

On the other hand, Python is a lot easier to learn (particularly for someone coming from other programming languages) and (outside academia) a lot more widely known and used. As a statistical language it's less mature than R, but it's perfectly adequate and improving all the time. As a language it's more versatile, easier to create stuff that needs to be put into production, and people outside the data/statistical field are going to be more comfortable with it.

If I wanted to work in data and was picking one or the other to learn today - I'd probably go with Python. The only exception would be if I was specifically planning on doing university/research work, where R is still king.

But before learning either, I'd become an SQL ninja.
This is the correct answer.
 

Snake_Baker

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If I wanted to work in data and was picking one or the other to learn today - I'd probably go with Python. The only exception would be if I was specifically planning on doing university/research work, where R is still king.

But before learning either, I'd become an SQL ninja.
I'm looking in to learning some coding, but I am very green about the subject, so do you or others have any input regarding how to best go about this from a conceptual learning perspective?

Should someone start out with C and then progress to Python, then R?

Hopw much more difficult to operate are C, Python and R in relation to each other?

Thoughts on Wendows or Linux OS for undertaking these tasks?
 

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Cluggage

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I'm looking in to learning some coding, but I am very green about the subject, so do you or others have any input regarding how to best go about this from a conceptual learning perspective?

Should someone start out with C and then progress to Python, then R?

Hopw much more difficult to operate are C, Python and R in relation to each other?

Thoughts on Wendows or Linux OS for undertaking these tasks?
Python is the best to learn for beginners. If you’re keen on programming for more data-oriented purposes, that will be the best bet along the way in tandem with R.

If you’re not so interested in data, statistics and automation, however - JavaScript would perhaps be your best bet... especially if you’d like to venture into the realm of software/web development.

Plenty of free resources on the internet for both.
 

Snake_Baker

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Python is the best to learn for beginners. If you’re keen on programming for more data-oriented purposes, that will be the best bet along the way in tandem with R.

If you’re not so interested in data, statistics and automation, however - JavaScript would perhaps be your best bet... especially if you’d like to venture into the realm of software/web development.

Plenty of free resources on the internet for both.
Many thanks for your response.

So the absolute programming novice should start out with Python?

I probably should have framed my question better, but would Python also be your choice for the novice to gain the easiest path for the conceptual understanding of programming? It's just that I have read here & there that C programming gives the learner a more basic insight in to the software-hardware interplay, and my initial goal is not necessarily to first achieve any programming outcomes from the outset, but rather to better understand the underlying concepts of programming, as I reckon this would be the good base to underpin further learning.

As for R programming, I think I probably would like to learn it as I am currently doing work as a molecular physics research, and I assume this programming format would have various uses. Should a novice learn another programming language prior to looking at R?

Basically, If I was your 12 year old kid, what path would you map out from start to finish in order for me to become an adequate programmer?
 

Caesar

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Python is pretty generally regarded as the best beginner language these days. It is very simple and high-level, which allows you to focus on learning the fundamentals of programming concepts rather than getting bogged down in complex syntax. It is very popular and flexible so there are a lot of resources around.

Some old-school programmers say you should learn on a low-level language like C, because it teaches you more about how computers actually work. Whilst I think that is absolutely valuable, personally I think it is better to come to C a little later. If you already have a decent grasp of the fundamentals, it makes it easier to focus on the additional complexities that a lower level language brings (pointers, memory management, etc).

But at the end of the day, I wouldn’t fixate too much on what language you start with. Learning programming is more about learning a way of thinking than learning a language.

Once you get a solid grasp of programming concepts, moving from language to language becomes relatively easy.
 

Chief

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I've decided to get into programming while locked down, i'm going to get a Raspberry Pi but figure I should learn how to program it.

I did a bit of C programming at uni but not much, also did a bit of microcontroller programming too, so not starting from zero.

Anyone got any tips/videos/projects they want to share?
I just started playing with this again a few weeks ago when I had brilliant idea. I may drop this idea when I run into too many obstacles, gaps in my knowledge, less time when the footy starts up again.
 

Suspense

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Thoughts on Wendows or Linux OS for undertaking these tasks?
You can learn the Python language on any OS - but macOS and Linux are much friendlier environments for Python development.
If you really want Windows, the new WSL 2 (Window Subsystem for Linux) is actually pretty decent for coding in Linux VMs on a Windows machine and integrates smoothly with VS Code.

Basically, If I was your 12 year old kid, what path would you map out from start to finish in order for me to become an adequate programmer?
Python is a great first language. For something fun and interactive, I would buy a BBC micro:bit as well. The amount of functionality on this $28 board is astounding. It has a simple web-based editor to code and upload programs (it's literally designed for 12-year-olds), there are lots of resources and you can code in either blocks, Python or JavaScript.
 

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