ANZAC Day 2015 - St Kilda Players who died at war | Page 2 | BigFooty

ANZAC Day 2015 - St Kilda Players who died at war

Discussion in 'St Kilda' started by Sunshine Saint, Jan 27, 2015.

  1. Sunshine Saint

    Sunshine Saint Cancelled

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    http://australianfootball.com/players/player/Bert+O%27Connell/2438

    Albert (Bert) O'Connell
    Private 24th Battalion, First A.I.F

    277th Player to Represent St Kilda
    2 Games / 0 Goals - 1908
    Age at Death: 32

    Bert O'Connell was born at Inglewood Victoria. O'Connell's story is one of bravery, adversity, persistence and tragedy. O'Connell played two games for St Kilda in 1908. From there up to his enlistment on April 10, 1915 in the First A.I.F, O'Connell's occupation is listed as a labourer. O'Connell sailed from Melbourne on June 25, 1915 on the HMAT Ceramic A40.

    O'Connell was posted to the war front at Gallipoli. Whilst there he has hospitalised in a field hospital at Anzac (Gallipoli) with dysentery and then pyrexia (fever). At that time Bert's mother received a written note from a nurse in the field hospital at Anzac informing her that her other son was there with pneumonia and that Bert had also been there and was fairing poorly and had been sent back to the front at Gallipoli still suffering with dysentery.

    After the evacuation from Gallipoli, O'Connell was sent to the front in France and Belgium. It was here on the Western Front that he was wounded for the first time, with his medical record listing him as temporarily unfit for service, due to have taken on shrapnel. O'Connell throughout his military career was wounded a further three occasions, with the fourth in which he suffered extensive gun shots wounds to the shoulder and down his complete side, eventually proving fatal. It appears from a letter from Bert's mother, that Bert and his brother were in the trench together at the Western Front in France, when they became separated and lost touch with each other. Bert was shot shortly after this and his brother had heard that he had been wounded and sent to England.

    The hardship of the conditions showed in his time on the Western Front when he was hospitalised several times with bronchitis and once for conjunctivitis. It should be noted that O'Connell immediately rejoined his battalion after each illness, or from wounds suffered in action.

    It is worth noting the incredible sacrifices that so many families made in Australia towards all wars,but especially World War 1. Bert O'Connell's family was a reflection of this. Bert's mother Mrs Mary Smith from Wedderburn wrote to military authorities at different times inquiring as to the whereabouts and condition of different family members. These being her sons Bert and his brother J. O'Connell, her husband J.R Smith (one of the legendary Western Front tunnellers) and her son in law P.W Hocking. On one occasion after writing inquiring as to all four, she is informed that her son J.O'Connell is wounded in hospital, but that they have no news on the others, so it is to be assumed they are with their units and ok.

    Below is the text of the letter to Mrs Smith (letter in documents below) informing her of Bert's death:

    "Dear Madam,
    With reference to the report of the regrettable loss of your son, the late No 1546, Private A O'Connell, 24th Battalion, I am now in receipt of advice which shows that he was wounded (4th occasion) on 1st September 1918 and admitted to the 12th General Hospital, Rouen, France, the following day. He was transferred to England and admitted to the 3rd Western General Hospital, Cardiff, Wales, on 6/9/18, where he died on 1st November 1918 as a result of his wounds (gun-shot wound right shoulder, right leg, right side and foot). He was buried in Cardiff New Cemetery, Cardiff, Wales, Grave No. 56, Section RH. Consecrated ground, the Rev. Father G. Elson officiating.

    The deceased soldier was accorded a full military funeral, firing party, bugler and pall bearers being in attendance. The coffin (good polished elm) was draped with the Union Jack and conveyed to the grave side on a gun carriage, surrounded by several beautiful wreaths sent from Australian Red Cross and Nursing Staff. The "Last Post" was sounded at the grave side. Mrs Hedger Wallace, Australian Red Cross, 4 Rast Grove, Cardiff, was present at the funeral. Administrative Headquarters A.I.F London were represented at the funeral. The grave will be buried and an oak cross erected by the A.I.F London.

    The utmost care and attention is being devoted where possible to the graves of our soldiers. It is understood that photographs are being taken as soon as possible and these will be transmitted to next-of-kin when available."



    Lest We Forget


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  2. CALL ME SNAKE

    CALL ME SNAKE Brownlow Medallist

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    Reading all this stuff brings up mixed emotions .
    Pride towards the brave men and women who gave their all for their country.
    But sadness at the many familys devestated by the brutality of war.
    So many cut down in their prime:(


    Edwin Starr was right.
     
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  3. Sunshine Saint

    Sunshine Saint Cancelled

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    So true. I found the one on Bert O'Connell especially tragic. He spent over 3 years on active duty in both Gallipoli and Western Front - Belgium and Turkey - was dreadfully ill a number of times, was wounded 4 times and for the first three had minimal recovery time and was sent straight back to his unit at the front. And behind all of this, was his mother inquiring after him, his brother, her husband and her son-in-law. When I have time, I will see if I can find out what happened to the other members of the family and add it as a note to the bottom of Bert's write up.
     
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  4. CALL ME SNAKE

    CALL ME SNAKE Brownlow Medallist

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    Your doing a very good job Sunshine.:thumbsu:
    Even though it saddens me to read a lot of these articles I also find it facinating to read about our History be it good or bad.
    My Grandfather was a prisoner of war so Anzac day always meant a lot to me anyway.
    But after reading about all these fallen soldiers with a StKilda connection, the Saints Anzac day game now means a hell of alot more to me than just a great marketing idea by the club .
     
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  5. Sunshine Saint

    Sunshine Saint Cancelled

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    http://australianfootball.com/players/player/Jack+Shelton/5221

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Shelton

    John (Jack) Thomas Shelton
    Lieutenant 2/21st Battalion, Second A.I.F

    591st Player to Represent St Kilda
    28 Games / 4 Goals - 1926, 1928-29
    Age at Death: 36

    439th Player to Represent South Melbourne (Sydney Swans)
    7 Games / 2 Goals - 1930

    Jack Shelton was the son of Richard John and Jane Elizabeth Shelton (née Skinner) and was born at Avenel, Victoria on 24 January 1905. As a young lad of 7, Jack's father had been saved from drowning in swollen Hughes Creek, Avanel by a young Ned Kelly aged 10.

    Jack married Winifred Emma Planck Gadd in 1932. He was the father of John Shelton (born 13 August 1933) and Hawthorn's Bill Shelton (born 13 July 1936), and the uncle of Essendon's Ian "Bluey" Shelton.

    As a VFL footballer, he was sometimes known as "J. A. Shelton" (rather than "J. T. Shelton" ), with the "A" most likely a reference to Avenel, in order to distinguish him from the other Jack Shelton, John Frederick "Jack" Shelton, a prolific goalkicker, recruited from Koo Wee Rup in 1926, who was playing for St Kilda at the same time.

    Although he began as a forward and rover, throughout his later senior football career he played as an either a backman or in the ruck. He was a tough player who played hard and fair.

    In fact, although a very tough and relentless footballer, this Jack Shelton, unlike his team-mate John Frederick "Jack" Shelton, was never reported, let alone suspended, in his entire football career.

    He received his clearance to play for St Kilda on 28 April 1926. He played eleven senior games for St Kilda in his first season, playing his first game, on the half-forward flank, against Hawthorn at the Junction Oval on 5 June 1926.

    He returned to Avenel for the 1927 season; and, once again, came back to play with St Kilda in mid-1928, resuming his senior career in the eighth round match against Essendon, in the first ruck, at Windy Hill, on 4 June 1928. Shelton played very well in his first game back in the VFL, and St Kilda won by 9 points. He played eleven senior matches for St Kilda in 1928 (rounds 8 to 18 inclusive) and six in 1929, with his last match against Richmond, at the Punt Road Oval on 13 July 1929 (round eleven).

    South Melbourne (Sydney Swans)
    Shelton received his clearance to play for South Melbourne on 11 June 1930. He played his first match for South Melbourne, as a back-pocket ruckman, against Hawthorn on 14 June 1930 (round seven). South Melbourne thrashed Hawthorn 17.11 (119) to 9.10 (64), in its first win for the 1930 season.

    He played the next two matches (rounds eight and nine), and the last four matches of the season, retiring after playing against North Melbourne at the Lake Oval on 13 September 1930. He was one of the best players in a team that soundly beat North Melbourne 15.19 (109) to 4.14 (38), having kicked 9.6 (60) to 1.1 (7) in the last quarter.

    Avenel
    He received his clearance to play for Avenel on 3 June 1931. In 1934, in a match against Nagambie, he broke a collarbone. At the time of his enlistment in the second AIF, in mid-1940, he was still playing football for Avenel, and was the captain of the Avenel team.

    Soldier
    Both his eldest brother, Private Richard John Shelton (1895-1967) and his second oldest brother, Sergeant Leslie Norman Shelton (1897-1933), had served in the First AIF (they both enlisted on 19 September 1914, with Leslie producing letters of permission from his mother and father).

    On 23 July 1940, Jack left his farm, "Mittagong", at Avenel and enlisted in the second AIF aged 35.

    After training at Wangaratta, he was promoted to Lieutenant, joined the 2/24th Battalion and was sent to the Middle East, and then Northern Africa, with the 9th Division. He was killed in action, at Tobruk, on 1 May1941

    Account of Jack Shelton's death
    "Lieutenant John Thomas Shelton (VX47976) At 6 a.m. our carriers moved forward towards "B" Company,although was not yet light. By 7 a.m. the mist was lifting, and Lieutenant John Shelton volunteered to go forward to "A" Company. The mist lifted and observers at B.H.Q. saw his carrier drive down the Acroma road past "B" road past "B" Company. The mist rolled down again, cutting out any observation until twenty minutes later, when a carrier was observed burning on the Acroma Road. Sergeant John Catherall took his carrier forward at the same time towards "C" Company, but came under fire from enemy tanks which had come through the wire in "A" Company's area and had knocked out Shelton's carrier. Shelton, who was driving, was killed, but his foot jammed on the accelerator and his crew were able to turn the vehicle back; but they were then hit again and the petrol tank blew up. Sergeant Catherall was able to pick up the two surviving crew members. John Shelton had proved himself a courageous soldier and was the first of our officers to be killed in action."

    Jack Shelton's name appears on the Roll of Honour (panel 52) at the Australian War memorial. He has no known grave, and is commemorated at the Alamein Memorial, in Egypt.

    Lest We Forget


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  6. Kildonan

    Kildonan Moderator

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    http://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/a...-day-performance/story-fni5f9q3-1227242044959

    St Kilda is determined not to pay lip service to such an important event, constantly educating its younger players about the meaning of the historic day.

    “It is such an honour for us to go out and honour the men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice for these great countries,’’ Savage said.

    “Our first to fourth year players had a pre-season camp in Canberra and we did a lot of Anzac Day study over there and spoke to a few of the Soldier On (support group) people who gave us their experiences of war.

    “To go to the Shrine and see all those names on the war was a really humbling experience and we will take that into the game on April 25.”
     
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  7. Sunshine Saint

    Sunshine Saint Cancelled

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    http://australianfootball.com/players/player/Otto+Lowenstern/2771

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_Lowenstern

    http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discov...1914-1918-cef/Pages/item.aspx?IdNumber=538150

    Otto Lowenstern
    Sergeant Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians)


    350th Player to Represent St Kilda
    12 Games / 1 Goal - 1910-1911
    Age at Death: 28

    Otto Lowenstern spent both the 1910 and 1911 seasons playing in the VFL. He only appeared once in 1910 but played 11 games in 1911 under coach Eddie Drohan.

    Lowenstein enlisted in Canada on November 16, 1914 and fought in World War 1, with the Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians) regiment of the Royal Canadian Armoured Corps. Lowenstern was killed while fighting in France on 1 December 1917 and is buried at Vimy Memorial at Pas-de-Calais.

    Lest We Forget

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  8. Sunshine Saint

    Sunshine Saint Cancelled

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuart_King

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    http://australianfootball.com/players/player/Stuart+King/5338

    http://boylesfootballphotos.net.au/Stuart+King

    Stuart King
    Flying Officer, 11th Squadron, R.A.A.F


    649th Player to Represent St Kilda
    43 Games / 14 Goals - 1931-1933
    Age at Death: 36

    Stuart Patrick King was St Kilda's all round sporting star. King played both first class cricket for Victoria and Australian Rules Football for St Kilda.

    Born in Ararat, Victoria, King started his cricket career first, debuting for Victoria in the 1926/27 Sheffield Shield season. He was a right-handed wicket-keeper batsman and batted in the middle order. The last of his 12 first-class matches was played in 1932/33 and he finished with 417 runs at 27.80. His claim to fame as a cricketer was scoring seven of Victoria's world record 1107 runs against New South Wales in his debut summer.

    After being recruited from the University Blacks, King played his first VFL match for St Kilda in 1931 and the following year was appointed club captain. When Charlie Hardy left the Saints seven games into the 1932 season he acted as a caretaker coach for the rest of the year. King played mostly as a defender and in his three seasons managed 43 games.

    King after finishing at St Kilda studied to be a solicitor and moved back to Aarat as the local solicitor. King enlisted in the Royal Australian Air Force on 30 March 1942 and was posted to 20 Squadron, gaining the rank of Flying Officer.

    King was posted to No 20 Squadron as an Intelligence Officer and was killed when A24-25, a Catalina from No 11 Squadron, is presumed to have crashed in the sea on 28 February 1943. A24-25 failed to return from an anti-submarine patrol off Cairns to protect a convoy and left the convoy at dusk to return to Cairns. A garbled message was received at 2251 hours EAST which contained the words "Force land". There was no further news from the aircraft. RAAF Guards reported that an aircraft had been seen circling Fitzroy Island. An aircraft rounded Cape Grafton and disappeared in a north easterly direction. A three day search for the aircraft was unsuccessful. It was believed that the Catalina may have crashed into the sea north east of Green Island.

    Officially his death is listed as in Papua New Guinea and he is remembered on the Port Moresby Memorial, Port Moresby, Papua, Papua New Guinea.

    Lest We Forget


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    RAAF Intelligence Officers, 255538 Flying Officer (FO) Harold Peter Moschetti (left) and 255266 FO Stuart Patrick King, examine aerial photographs of the Japanese-held Kahili airstrip on Bougainville Island through a stereoscope.

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    Flying Officer (FO) Harold Peter Moschetti (left) and 255266 FO Stuart Patrick King, examine aerial photographs of the Japanese-held Kahili airstrip on Bougainville Island.

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  9. Sunshine Saint

    Sunshine Saint Cancelled

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    https://www.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1636000/?query=Louis+Holmes&section[0]=people&op=Search

    http://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ListingReports/ItemsListing.aspx

    http://australianfootball.com/players/player/Lou+Holmes/2762

    Louis (Lou) Gordon Holmes
    Captain 10th Battalion, First A.I.F

    341st Player to Represent St Kilda
    1 Game / 0 Goals - 1910
    Age at Death: 22

    Lou Holmes played his one and only game for St Kilda at the tender age of 18 years 16 days. Lou was from a medical family from Norwood South Australia. He was in Melbourne studying at Melbourne University when he played for St Kilda.

    Lou is one of three ex-St Kilda players who died from wounds at Gallipoli. At only 22 Holmes was at the rank of captain, which shows obvious leadership and man management skills.

    Lou was wounded on June 17th, 1915, with his parents notified that he had been wounded but that it was a minor wound. It appears that Lou then took little or no leave to recover as he was then wounded again with gun shot wounds to the abdomen, only 3 days later on June 20th, 1915.

    Lou was taken from Gallipoli to the hospital ship HS Bascon, where he passed away on June 23rd. Lou was buried at sea, 3 miles off shore from Gaba Tepe. Unfortunately his parents were then notified again that he had suffered wounds again, which he died from.

    Lou Holmes is remembered at the Lone Pine Memorial at Gallipoli.

    LEST WE FORGET


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  10. dct66

    dct66 Premium Gold

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    Very nice Sunshine Saint. Well done!
     
  11. inamedthegiants

    inamedthegiants Premiership Player

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    Amazing reading.

    Lest We Forget.
     
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  12. Kildonan

    Kildonan Moderator

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    Magnificent work Sunshine Saint
     
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  13. CursingFijian

    CursingFijian Premium Platinum

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    Fantastic work Sunshine Saint, and there is some great reading. We can also be proud of Saint Kilda's participation in the Soldier On programme, which allows us to acknowledge and appreciate people who have served on a weekly basis.
     
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