As an 80s baby I have massive nostalgia for the 90s...but

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2006_Eagles

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I just listened to Glycerine by Bush and it hit me in the real feels. it was a different nostalgia than what I feel for the 80s but just as intense

Im trying to differentiate my nostalgia for the 80s and 90s bit it’s really ******* hard
 

Roobs321

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As an '88 baby, I view the 80s as the heritage milieu I was born into and which informs who I am today, but I was too young to remember it and form nostalgia. The 90s (through to early 00s) forms my childhood experience and therefore my nostalgia. I find a lot of the music I dig most is heavily embedded in that '88-'93 scene, which would strongly influence the sort of dominant sounds I first heard flogged on mid- and late- 90s radio.

I didn't have television until I hit school, nor parents with a music collection, so my earliest days were more about reading than media exposure. The outside world was mostly what I read about or came across until 1993-ish. Then pop culture and school floods in.
 

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La Dispute

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90s nostalgia kicks in when you realise it was the last great decade for rock.

Now it's auto-tune, Taylor Swift dross and a way higher % of garbage compared to decent songs.
This is a huge oversimplification.

There is still plenty of great rock music, mostly in the post-hardcore and metal realms, and a lot of interesting indie rock albums being put out through channels like Bandcamp and Soundcloud. Scenes/genres are just far more disparate and don't have mainstream appeal like a lot of bands from the 90's, and also music has become commodified to the extent that talented bands just don't prosper. It's no surprise why a band like Tame Impala are hailed as the greatest band of our generation - there's just no other artists making popular rock music.

The 90's was great though. Nirvana, Sublime, RHCP, Modest Mouse, Weezer, Elliott Smith... 'Alternative' bands were celebrated. These days you have to work to find quality, but it's not impossible.
 

La Dispute

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I just listened to Glycerine by Bush and it hit me in the real feels. it was a different nostalgia than what I feel for the 80s but just as intense

Im trying to differentiate my nostalgia for the 80s and 90s bit it’s really ******* hard
I rate Glycerine. One of those watered down post-grunge songs that's pretty immortal. The whole 'bad moon white again' bridge is a nice change-up.

I like Swallowed the most out of their bigger hits.
 
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I went to high school in the 90s so musical tastes were forming through those years. Occasionally stumble across a track that takes me back

 

FRUMPY

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I went to high school in the 90s so musical tastes were forming through those years. Occasionally stumble across a track that takes me back
Your biggest music influences are from your teenage years i reckon - its when you go from a kid to an adult and working out who you are - the most defining part of your life so the music you listened to then is the music you refer back to i reckon. For me my main music influences are from about 1995 to 2000 (14-19 yrs old)
 

Mootsy

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It’s more that in the 90s cool music entered the mainstream far more often on platforms like radio and music tv, often marketed with pretty good music videos as well. So the mainstream platform was narrower enough that it meant that you could be out at the shops with friends or family and you would hear a string of great rock songs or songs in general, and quite often a pretty good dance song, indie, whatever.

The 80s sort of had that as well, just with far less grunge and indie rock, it was far more new wave and synthy

Another thing is that pop culture was way more classy and most people could relate to that wholesomeness of style and art. Even hip hop was very articulated with well woven lyrics.

Feature music wasn’t intimidating back then, it was exciting and often memorable.

post 2007 era and mainstream music is far more plastic, tacky, narcissistic and mostly forgettable, and often lacks class instead being replaced with low brow themes and so on. This has gone on for years and years and hasn’t really stopped. It’s just the platforms have changed.

thats why it’s easy to feel 90s nostalgia, but it’s usually because mainstream was a bit more exciting and classy.

music has always been great, it’s just how each decades promotes that great music or doesnt at all.

right now you could describe music as a digital asteroid field of many platforms and kind of confusing and hard to keep up with with hardly any promotion in the direction of “exciting”, “memorable”, and, “classy”. Instead it’s way more about style, image and production.
 
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2006_Eagles

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Your biggest music influences are from your teenage years i reckon - its when you go from a kid to an adult and working out who you are - the most defining part of your life so the music you listened to then is the music you refer back to i reckon. For me my main music influences are from about 1995 to 2000 (14-19 yrs old)
I'm a year younger than you but I still associate/feel the most nostalgia for the 80s. It's close tho
 

dumb

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i'm not sure if i feel nostalgia or it's mid-life crisis. poring over e-bay for the old lego sets i used to play with when i was 10 years old, old console games...

in terms of music though, it's always been a more solitary exercise for myself. no-one in my group shared my tastes, and when i think of the music i listened to and still listen to, i don't associate it with a good time in my life. sorry to make your thread even more miserable. it makes me realise i'm a big boy now with responsibilities and no, i probably can't be bothered wearing a cannibal corpse l/s down the street.

bands i got turned onto by previous partners always generate some sort of positive feels though which i wish i understood why. even if i never really appreciated that music until after we'd parted. aside from that, there's no moment in time i point to, i just have the music.
 

Bostonian

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Gen X got the best deal music wise.

They grew up listening to their parents 60/70s albums as kids.

Their own musical eras for growing up during and being immersed as fans was packed with amazing bands and music.

And if they did the festivals and pubs right at the time are now half deaf and can't hear most of pox that's on radio these days.
 

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La Dispute

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i'm not sure if i feel nostalgia or it's mid-life crisis. poring over e-bay for the old lego sets i used to play with when i was 10 years old, old console games...

in terms of music though, it's always been a more solitary exercise for myself. no-one in my group shared my tastes, and when i think of the music i listened to and still listen to, i don't associate it with a good time in my life. sorry to make your thread even more miserable. it makes me realise i'm a big boy now with responsibilities and no, i probably can't be bothered wearing a cannibal corpse l/s down the street
Yeh I relate to that, but my sense of nostalgia seems to be inverted so I can’t help but feel quite content, or at least have reasonably good associations with some average times in my life.

My taste in music has undoubtably been shaped by the internet, and after high school found music exclusively through review sites. It’s always interested me how albums age, and which artists have ascended through distribution online. It’s telling how quickly fans move on from mediocre albums, while classic indie rock albums endure, and more communities are built around bringing to light the best bands that Bandcamp have to offer.

It’s hard to compare to the pre-internet days as I only started properly listening to music in the mid 00’s but the immediacy of access and widespread commentary online surrounding indie rock albums today is fantastic.
 

DEVO

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I left school in 1989 and started my first job in January 1990 about 100 metres from the old Impact Records store near the Electric Shadows cinemas in Canberra. Impact Records was the local music shop that carried a lot of alternative, metal and lesser known music acts and I used to spend every lunch time in there listening to what they were playing and checking out other artists that weren't being played on our mainstream radio stations. Around the same time JJJ arrived Canberra and they played a big part in defining the music I'd listen too and buy as well. Artists such as the Falling Joys, The Clouds, Sonic Youth, Curve, The Charlatans, Lush, Def FX, Beasts Of Bourbon I either first heard at Impact Records or on JJJ.
 

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