Australia is OK

(Log in to remove this ad.)

Scotland

TheBrownDog
May 5, 2006
50,447
52,448
AFL Club
West Coast
Can someone explain this to me. Their vote doesn't count, right? Like the government have the majority vote so why would it even matter if they said nope?
In order to be enacted the bill needs to pass through both houses of parliament.

The coalition hold 35 Senate seats out of 72 so cannot pass legislation without approval from members of other parties. Common for bills to be amended in return for support.

While I don't agree with the bill per se, people are predictably up in arms about 'the rich' getting tax cuts and not the poor.

In the short term you get squat if you are 'rich'. The $1,080 rebate thing applies to people earning $48,000-$90,000 and reduces to zero between $90k and $126k. Is more money in the pockets of people earning $50k, $60k a bad thing? Over time the brackets and rates will be adjusted. Eventually all income between $45,000 and $200,000 will be taxed at 30%. When you adjust the brackets and rates at the bottom that filters through to the top, that's how a progressive tax system works. It's arguably fairer to just lift the tax free threshold from $18k to say $25k or $30k but that would benefit all taxpayers and then people would want the 'rich' paying more...

 

ioppolo

Brownlow Medallist
Oct 3, 2010
21,062
13,082
Perth
AFL Club
West Coast
Other Teams
Chelsea, OKC Thunder, Scorchers
I'm confused by posters in here. My partner and I are on roughly 96k combined before tax. We live quite well off and go on an annual holiday and splurge. We don't have to budget. We have money left over every fortnight to save. Don't know what I'm doing differently to others.
 

Bomberboyokay

Brownlow Medallist
Sep 27, 2014
27,458
23,830
Live from Here
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Roosters, Mets, West Ham
Don't know what I'm doing differently to others.
Probably not living in a North Shore bubble.

But I did read an article about people on six figures not feeling rich because at work they're more likely to regularly interact with people who are indisputably rich.

One interesting thing, says Dr Jill Sheppard, lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University, is that people in the middle of the income range know they are in the middle, “but people at the fringes get it wrong”.

“Those who are making a lot of money – $90,000 to $150,000 – don’t realise how well off they are,” she says.

It’s easy to see why. The middle covers a relatively small range of income – from about $40,000 to $80,000. In all likelihood, if you are in that range, so are those in your social circle, give or take $20,000. But once you get above that level, it’s very different. The top 10 per cent of the income scale encompasses a much broader range of income – from $94,000 to Gina Rinehart.

So if you’re earning, say, $100,000, you are likely working and socialising with people whose income and wealth are multiples of yours. In monkey terms, you’re in the cage adjoining the grape eaters.

And that is apt to make you feel poorer than you are. As the social researcher Rebecca Huntley noted in a blog for MLC last year, the result is that 60 per cent of households with incomes of about $145,000 misidentified themselves as being middle class.

They considered a middle-class lifestyle to include annual overseas trips, private schools and expensive extracurricular activities for their children, regular dining out, new cars and the latest household technology. All the while, they complained about the cost of living.

These people are rich, but no politician dares tell them, for fear of being resented.

In 2006, Maserati sold 107 cars in Australia. Last year, the Italian brand sold 483, an almost fivefold increase. Sales of other luxury cars have also enjoyed booming sales over the past decade. Porsche sales quadrupled to 4434. Audi went from 5770 to 24,258. BMW almost doubled to more than 28,000, and Mercedes-Benz more than doubled to more than 41,000. Add in Ferrari, Lamborghini, Rolls-Royce and you get about 100,000 sales, each one involving more money than 90 per cent of Australians earn in a year.

“Demand is very, very strong, particularly for what we call heavy metal – that is, stuff over $150,000,” says David McCarthy, senior manager, product, public relations and corporate communications for Mercedes.

“The traditional buyers are established business owners, but in the past few years we’ve seen small- to medium-sized business owners buying themselves expensive cars as a reward.”

Another noticeable trend among high-income earners, Sheppard says, is that they increasingly do not fit our customary measures of “class’’.

“Traditionally we’ve equated occupation with class,” she says. “But now tradespeople have started to make good money, and that is decoupling perceptions of class from occupation.”

That has wider social and political ramifications, as was recognised more than a decade ago by the then prime minister, John Howard. He realised a growing number of workers who had traditionally been Labor voters were in many ways natural conservatives, previously bound to Labor on financial grounds. But as their incomes grew, as ever more became independent contractors in a deregulated workplace, they were ripe for the wooing.

He called them “aspirational” voters. Tony Abbott also went out of his way to attract them. Remember “Tony’s tradies”?

More recently, though, many have found a new political home: One Nation.

As David Marr notes in his recent Quarterly Essay on Pauline Hanson’s party, its voters are not like the left-behind working poor who voted for Donald Trump. He cites data from the Australian Election Study held after the most recent federal election.

Most of the people who voted for Hanson had actually done quite well for themselves. They were half as likely to have gone to university, but twice as likely to have a trade qualification.

Interestingly, the highest percentage of self-identified members of the working class were One Nation supporters, at 66 per cent, compared with 45 for Labor, 46 for the Nationals and 32 per cent for the Liberal Party.

But perhaps their most telling demographic characteristic is that they are malcontented.

In response to the survey question: “How does the financial situation of your own household compare with what it was 12 months ago?”, 68 per cent of One Nation voters responded that it was worse. That compares with 25 per cent for Nationals voters, 27 for the Greens, 29 for Liberals and 38 for Labor.

And when asked about the state of the economy generally, they were even more pessimistic. Almost three-quarters – 73 per cent – thought it worse than a year ago.

And yet, as Marr notes, the Australian Election Study showed them to be marginally more prosperous than the average Australian.

Just when you thought Australians could not get any more deluded about their relative good fortune, along comes a whole new cohort of well-to-do whingers.

Our leaders really should tell them they have not got much to complain about. Although that seems unlikely: we’re still not ready to even talk about what “rich” means.

 
Last edited:

Cruyff14

TheBrownDog
Aug 16, 2011
53,179
34,996
Melbourne
AFL Club
Hawthorn
Other Teams
Arsenal
I'm confused by posters in here. My partner and I are on roughly 96k combined before tax. We live quite well off and go on an annual holiday and splurge. We don't have to budget. We have money left over every fortnight to save. Don't know what I'm doing differently to others.
What do your expenses include?
 

Scotland

TheBrownDog
May 5, 2006
50,447
52,448
AFL Club
West Coast
I don't consider earning $100k p.a. as rich. Income rich isn't really a thing in Australia unless you earn multiples of the average Joe. The average AFL player earns about $350k and they're not out there buying Lamborghinis for cash and partying on super yachts.

Asset rich is where the real wealth disparity lies.
 

SM

Bigfooty Legend
Aug 3, 2008
86,613
47,529
North Shore
AFL Club
Sydney
Other Teams
Hull City, Adelaide United, EH
I'm confused by posters in here. My partner and I are on roughly 96k combined before tax. We live quite well off and go on an annual holiday and splurge. We don't have to budget. We have money left over every fortnight to save. Don't know what I'm doing differently to others.
96k after tax? That's basically what I live on. As I said I'm comfortable but I wouldn't say wealthy.

EDIT: Before tax I find it incredibly hard to believe you live comfortably in any sort of suburban area. $350-400 a week in rent for a one bedroom apartment is almost $20k a year, before power, gas, internet, food, and travel expenses.
 
Last edited:

(Log in to remove this ad.)

SM

Bigfooty Legend
Aug 3, 2008
86,613
47,529
North Shore
AFL Club
Sydney
Other Teams
Hull City, Adelaide United, EH
You guys with your non-stop talk about '90k isn't good money' or 'AFL players aren't rich' sit there watching Suits with your hand on your cock?
I'm amazed you're able to type with such a big chip on your shoulder.

Do you understand the concept of a progressive tax system and what it does to income?
 

Silent Alarm

sack Lyon
Jul 9, 2010
24,130
25,915
AFL Club
Fremantle
I'm amazed you're able to type with such a big chip on your shoulder.

Do you understand the concept of a progressive tax system and what it does to income?
Yeah and I support it mate, if anything it should be heavier. Don't give me oh woe anything. You acting like you're a victim while you and your new mate brag about income and name drop having a partner is ludicrous and actually offensive. The world is harsh and things are difficult for a lot of people. A full time job is a nice thing and 90k is a lot of money.

As I said: it's offensive. People toil for a lot less. I know this is all a big stroke but seriously, it is offensive to people who don't make much money.
 

Scotland

TheBrownDog
May 5, 2006
50,447
52,448
AFL Club
West Coast
I'm amazed you're able to type with such a big chip on your shoulder.

Do you understand the concept of a progressive tax system and what it does to income?
Pretty sure he lives with his 'working class' parents in a suburb with a median house price of $1m.
 

Kram

I'll brik u
May 2, 2007
55,121
69,724
WA
AFL Club
Fremantle
Other Teams
Chicago Bears, de Boer, Arsenal

Scotland

TheBrownDog
May 5, 2006
50,447
52,448
AFL Club
West Coast
Why is everything so binary these days? There's a whole bunch of people called 'middle income earners' for a reason. They ain't rich, and they ain't poor.

$90k is an above average and above median wage. It's nothing to sneeze at but it's hardly sending Giles down to the market to buy the foie gras territory. If you can't survive off $90k then you need to seriously look at your expenditure. Maybe even check yo' privilege. But it's not 1% territory.

The old adage of 'if you're not a commy when you are young you have no heart, if you aren't a capitalist when you are old you have no brain' has some merit. I remember my weekly tax contribution being tens of dollars and then getting it all back in July anyway. Once you start paying thousands, multiple thousands, tens of thousands you start to get annoyed at people telling you how well off you are. I implore anyone who thinks 'tax the rich!' to go and and work away, do long hours in s**t conditions and then watch 30, 40, 50% of it get taken away by the govt. Might give them an appreciation of what it takes to get ahead of the game somewhat.

We have wayyyy bigger taxation problems than people earning $90k and only giving 20-30% of it to the govt.
 

SM

Bigfooty Legend
Aug 3, 2008
86,613
47,529
North Shore
AFL Club
Sydney
Other Teams
Hull City, Adelaide United, EH
Yeah and I support it mate, if anything it should be heavier. Don't give me oh woe anything. You acting like you're a victim while you and your new mate brag about income and name drop having a partner is ludicrous and actually offensive. The world is harsh and things are difficult for a lot of people. A full time job is a nice thing and 90k is a lot of money.

As I said: it's offensive. People toil for a lot less. I know this is all a big stroke but seriously, it is offensive to people who don't make much money.
I'm... Not. I'm explaining why me on 85k and him on what sounds like 50k take home a similar amount after tax.
 

Bomberboyokay

Brownlow Medallist
Sep 27, 2014
27,458
23,830
Live from Here
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Roosters, Mets, West Ham
Why is everything so binary these days? There's a whole bunch of people called 'middle income earners' for a reason. They ain't rich, and they ain't poor.

$90k is an above average and above median wage. It's nothing to sneeze at but it's hardly sending Giles down to the market to buy the foie gras territory. If you can't survive off $90k then you need to seriously look at your expenditure. Maybe even check yo' privilege. But it's not 1% territory.

The old adage of 'if you're not a commy when you are young you have no heart, if you aren't a capitalist when you are old you have no brain' has some merit. I remember my weekly tax contribution being tens of dollars and then getting it all back in July anyway. Once you start paying thousands, multiple thousands, tens of thousands you start to get annoyed at people telling you how well off you are. I implore anyone who thinks 'tax the rich!' to go and and work away, do long hours in s**t conditions and then watch 30, 40, 50% of it get taken away by the govt. Might give them an appreciation of what it takes to get ahead of the game somewhat.

We have wayyyy bigger taxation problems than people earning $90k and only giving 20-30% of it to the govt.
Nobody's losing 50% in income taxes, Liberal liar.
 

Bomberboyokay

Brownlow Medallist
Sep 27, 2014
27,458
23,830
Live from Here
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Roosters, Mets, West Ham
Resident tax rates 2019–20
Taxable incomeTax on this income
0 – $18,200Nil
$18,201 – $37,00019c for each $1 over $18,200
$37,001 – $90,000$3,572 plus 32.5c for each $1 over $37,000
$90,001 – $180,000$20,797 plus 37c for each $1 over $90,000
$180,001 and over$54,097 plus 45c for each $1 over $180,000


Not 50% or 49%. Not even close.
 

Top Bottom