Becoming the best Goal Kicking team in the league

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kp junior

Premiership Player
Nov 3, 2005
3,182
2,492
Perth
AFL Club
Fremantle
Other Teams
freo
1. Pay a lot of money to Dunstall, Suma anyone who knows how to kick set shots at an all time elite level, to run the one on one set shot goal kicking technique and routine coaching.

2. First day of the month every mid and forward takes 250 shots at goal from the standard 25 positions inside and up to 50m out. 10 set shots from each position.
This score is measured and the best scorer wears gold shorts for the month. Everyone knows who the best goal kicker in the team is. They’re wearing the gold shorts.

3. Every day each mid and forward player kicks 50 set shots at goal (2 for each position) and has technical coaching with Suma

Personal best scores out of 50 are recorded and measured over time.


Tell me we will still be kicking 8.18 in a year if the above is implemented


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Here's why nothing comes easy at old Freo, we have;

  • Midfield rejects reduced to forwards.
  • Small forwards who don't know how to crumb and are just pests being jumping jacks with our tall timber for some reason.
  • Tall forwards who work twice as hard as every other tall forward in the competition because of our ball movement.
  • Zero goal sense. Unless we kick the set shot coin-flip every other goal feels like luck, no skill or design to it. Oh yeah, and unless we get a 1 in 5 cool looking passage and can actually kick something from over the top.
  • Then the worst, Midfielders who have paranoid coaches crying to them to not take pings at goal. Just overuse the ball instead to reduce the angle and increase the %s, never mind the 50 times we turn it over from doing this a quarter.

It's actually insane how we blow our loads at Jeremy Sharp for kicking goals because it's so foreign to this club specifically, when every other club has multiple midfielders who kick goals regularly. Unfortunately for him since he's new, it will eventually be coached out of him.

What's even concerning is last week Serong had a set shot, the week before Brayshaw had one too, both 40 out, and the kicks were just God awful, not even WAFL standard.

Doesn't matter how good we play if there's no finish to it. These score-lines have been a consistent issue for a long time. We can't keep looking at the positives in wins or losses attributed to poor score-lines. Shit across the board needs to be fixed before it kills us again like it did in 2013.
 
Yep youre right KP. Its clear looking at some of the goal kicking routines they are not being coached by anyone who knows anything about goal kicking. Every one of those spuds who continually miss their goal shots should be copying the technique of one of the greats. They have nothing to lose, its not like they have a unique technique (think Josh Kennedy) thats working for them. Fyfes two step run up drives me mad and reeks of poor or non existant coaching.
 
1. Do one of those feel-good “ask the players” interviews where you ask the question “who is most important to you?”
2. Kidnap said person
3. At the end of the year any player that had kicked more goals than behinds gets their loved one backs, otherwise the loved ones get Harold Holted
4.????
5. Profit
 
uttleI suggest they practice goal kicking in the deep end of a pool with a weight tied to their foot.
No.

Has to be along the lines KP is suggesting.

Drills that can be measured by success and I'd include drills an element of perceived pressure from games situations as well as counting successes.

For example;
 
Last edited:
No.

Has to be along the lines KP is suggesting.

Drills that can be measured by success and I'd include drills an element of perceived pressure from games situations as well as counting successes.

For example;

1.Triangle drills in two teams per goal (or even better with 4 including two down the far end).

Person behind goals retrieves and kicks out to side. Wing centres to player running from 50 m, runs and shoots. Each player runs to the line they've just kicked two. Two or three balls per group, have to talk and pay attention to ball coming, keep organised and quick taking as many shots as possible.

Keep scores by yelling out loud as a team (all paying attention) each success. Can introduce passive D. First team to 21 (or choose a number) wins.

Call quick 'change' and start straight away. Have to concentrate and organise and not blaze away.

Can call 'diagonal' and teams have to run the length of field to diagonal positon.

Call 'reverse'. Kick from square to centre, kick to lead from wing who shoots. Follow ball to join that team. Two or more balls. Winning teams get prestige or some sort of 'prize'.

2. End of training. "Mailman" drill.

All line up on backline in self determined order of worst to best. Choose a reasonable positon 45m out. Have stationary defender or just start with cone. If the players is successful, they go to end of line and next person (who is already lined up behind them takes shot.

If they miss, everyone on base line runs first leg of shuttle and back. Four x 6 m marked out. Cones at 6, 12, 18, 24m Repeat. Can make the running line perpendicular to opposite point post to kicker and shuttle runs are to each post and back.

Next person misses, they run first and second legs and back. Shuttle is cumulative so by the time the last person takes their shot everyone is exhausted (including the kickers) and pressure is on the shooter not to miss.

Best kickers should be able to handle most pressure. But no one wants to miss and make everyone run after a hard training. Perceived pressure, and motivation to improve.

Edit: Someone should have camera on those that need help and be able to break the kick down so players understand where they are going wrong. No more than one or two things to change. Someone who is an excellent goal kicker but also smart enough to optimise for each player.
Pretty easy really.
Just need to give JLo a call 😜
 

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It's mindset just as much as technique.

Sydney players run through the 50 and they WANT to kick a goal. They have a team full of guys coached to be hungry to score. Unless there is a player clear in the open, or they are in a really bad position for a shot, then they will go for the pass. They are really clear in their mindset when to pass or when to go for goal, and it's a first look/first instinct thing, they choose their option and it's decisive.

We have guys running to the 50, weighing up options, oh there is a 1v1 in the pocket, a guy with a 2m gap on his man in the corridor, maybe that's a 40% chance, or maybe just kick for goal, too late it's a nothing kick through for a point. They're so overcoached to go for the extra pass to find that golden opportunity that they won't take a good opportunity that's in front of them. They're constantly in two minds and the accuracy reflects that. (set shots a bit different but that's also psychological)
 
It's mindset just as much as technique.

Sydney players run through the 50 and they WANT to kick a goal. They have a team full of guys coached to be hungry to score. Unless there is a player clear in the open, or they are in a really bad position for a shot, then they will go for the pass. They are really clear in their mindset when to pass or when to go for goal, and it's a first look/first instinct thing, they choose their option and it's decisive.

We have guys running to the 50, weighing up options, oh there is a 1v1 in the pocket, a guy with a 2m gap on his man in the corridor, maybe that's a 40% chance, or maybe just kick for goal, too late it's a nothing kick through for a point. They're so overcoached to go for the extra pass to find that golden opportunity that they won't take a good opportunity that's in front of them. They're constantly in two minds and the accuracy reflects that. (set shots a bit different but that's also psychological)
Technique is part of the mindset and vice versa.

Also there a tendency, given a gap in actual knowledge, to impose our own version of what's going on from a coaching standpoint. Often kinks in a game, like goal kicking yips etc, can develop independently, or even in spite of, what's happening from a coaching approach.
 
No.

Has to be along the lines KP is suggesting.

Drills that can be measured by success and I'd include drills an element of perceived pressure from games situations as well as counting successes.

For example;

1.Triangle drills in two teams per goal (or even better with 4 including two down the far end).

Person behind goals retrieves and kicks out to side. Wing centres to player running from 50 m, runs and shoots. Each player runs to the line they've just kicked two. Two or three balls per group, have to talk and pay attention to ball coming, keep organised and quick taking as many shots as possible.

Keep scores by yelling out loud as a team (all paying attention) each success. Can introduce passive D. First team to 21 (or choose a number) wins.

Call quick 'change' and start straight away. Have to concentrate and organise and not blaze away.

Can call 'diagonal' and teams have to run the length of field to diagonal positon.

Call 'reverse'. Kick from square to centre, kick to lead from wing who shoots. Follow ball to join that team. Two or more balls. Winning teams get prestige or some sort of 'prize'.

2. End of training. "Mailman" drill.

All line up on backline in self determined order of worst to best. Choose a reasonable positon 45m out. Have stationary defender or just start with cone. If the players is successful, they go to end of line and next person (who is already lined up behind them takes shot.

If they miss, everyone on base line runs first leg of shuttle and back. Four x 6 m marked out. Cones at 6, 12, 18, 24m Repeat. Can make the running line perpendicular to opposite point post to kicker and shuttle runs are to each post and back.

Next person misses, they run first and second legs and back. Shuttle is cumulative so by the time the last person takes their shot everyone is exhausted (including the kickers) and pressure is on the shooter not to miss.

Best kickers should be able to handle most pressure. But no one wants to miss and make everyone run after a hard training. Perceived pressure, and motivation to improve.

Edit: Someone should have camera on those that need help and be able to break the kick down so players understand where they are going wrong. No more than one or two things to change. Someone who is an excellent goal kicker but also smart enough to optimise for each player.
(Goal) kicking techniques are best done allowing for individual leeway. From a coaching standpoint it's then about providing each individual with the tools to develop/enhance their routine.

A routine is effective if it is repeatable with identifiable and adjustable components.

Classic footy club one size fits all drills, especially those with manufactured pressure, don't really facilitate that routine development. Any likelihood of it happening is random.
 
Technique is part of the mindset and vice versa.

Also there a tendency, given a gap in actual knowledge, to impose our own version of what's going on from a coaching standpoint. Often kinks in a game, like goal kicking yips etc, can develop independently, or even in spite of, what's happening from a coaching approach.

I agree with this but I'm more talking about goals from open play. Amiss might have the yips with his set shots at the moment but he still has an eye for the goal, he kicked a nice snap with the ball in motion on the weekend, it's a different thing altogether when you don't have to think about it and go through your routine.

And while everyone here imposes their own opinion on what goes on from a coaches standpoint, I'm also not the only one to observe that we as a team overpass and over-handball the ball a lot forward of centre which leads to the rushed or overcooked shots I'm talking about from open play.
 
I agree with this but I'm more talking about goals from open play. Amiss might have the yips with his set shots at the moment but he still has an eye for the goal, he kicked a nice snap with the ball in motion on the weekend, it's a different thing altogether when you don't have to think about it and go through your routine.

And while everyone here imposes their own opinion on what goes on from a coaches standpoint, I'm also not the only one to observe that we as a team overpass and over-handball the ball a lot forward of centre which leads to the rushed or overcooked shots I'm talking about from open play.
It's hard to know exactly though. There are times where you think, just take the shot. Equally though, you see someone take the shot and fluff it badly and you think there were open players you could've passed off to.
 
(Goal) kicking techniques are best done allowing for individual leeway. From a coaching standpoint it's then about providing each individual with the tools to develop/enhance their routine.

A routine is effective if it is repeatable with identifiable and adjustable components.

Classic footy club one size fits all drills, especially those with manufactured pressure, don't really facilitate that routine development. Any likelihood of it happening is random.

You don’t think practicing under pressure results in better performance in games under pressure ?


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You don’t think practicing under pressure results in better performance in games under pressure ?


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It might help from a maintenance perspective, assuming all routines (ie repeatable with identifiable and adjustable components) are in place and good order etc.

But as a group I'd think it wouldn't offer that much. The manufactured pressure at training is different from in game pressure. Also looking to improve managing pressure, it's really useful to be able to step in to the individual's routine in real time to identify the component that might be impacted. I mean, there's potential pressure there anyway. But any new technique or significant adjustment, where you're trying to lay down the tracks of a process as it were, that learning is not really aided by adding more pressure.

Staying in process and distanced from outcomes is a great pressure management technique.
 
I don't particularly want the players reaching the levels of fatigue during the week required to simulate match day conditions because I think it will burn them out, but that's how I think they will improve their kicking performance.

I would expect all of them to be kicking around 80% joking around, barely breaking a sweat, going through their routines - but that's not how the shots come in game.
 
I don't particularly want the players reaching the levels of fatigue during the week required to simulate match day conditions because I think it will burn them out, but that's how I think they will improve their kicking performance.

I would expect all of them to be kicking around 80% joking around, barely breaking a sweat, going through their routines - but that's not how the shots come in game.

Yep they need to be practicing fatigued and under some form of competitive pressure, and I would add it should be standardized and measured over time.


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Too close to man on mark and little momentum results in kicks that go high. They then drift off course. As a kid we were shown to pick out a spectator behind the goals, allow for any side wind and kick it to them as we would in open play. You don't see a dart player aiming for the 1,20,5 zones on a board when wanting a 20.
 

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