Boomers vs Kids these days

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Jumboprince

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Ugh. Another gut punch.
Think it was called the "lock up your daughters" tour :)

And yeah it is disturbing when you find out what they got up to, it is like the ones who portrayed themselves as evil devil worshippers were actually wholesome folk at heart but those who went for the genuine good guy tag, end up being the disturbing bastards...sort of like the preacher who spouts "morals...living by gods word etc" is the one cheating on his wife with a multitude of women.
 

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Norm Smith Medallist
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Yep, and this is the truth i hear daily. Boomers thankful that their 'shrewd' buying of a property 20 -30 years ago (any property as it turns out) has made them rich, of course by the younger generation being forced to pay 3-4 x RELATIVELY MORE on income levels these days. Too bad the younger generation is struggling under the weight of massive debts just trying to make ends meet (thankfully boomers also own most of the bank shares so the large net interest margins experienced by our Big 4 banks allows the boomers to generate the worlds highest income levels in retirement from the share market to allow them to keep them in the manner they are accustomed to).

My more astute, educated, honest and self-aware boomer clients actually say ' we have totally ***** things for the younger generation', we 'feel guilty how much better off we are' and 'we are the lucky generation'.

Others think they have become wealthy due to anything but the luck of when they were born and just dont get it. Its easier to ignore the truth and blame the 'avocado generation' for all their many issues being faced.

EDIT

And I do also acknowledge my posts purely relate to ECONOMIC issues. The current generations (myself a 'Gen X' and subsequent) have had much less impact (or no) exposure on the very serious and scary issues like Vietnam, Sth Korea and Middle East wars. Anyone serving for the country from previous or current generations deserves the utmost respect for the service and bravery shown, and I am genuinely sorry if any of my previous posts have offended anyone in this regard.
Mate it is not the Housing industry I am thanking them for, its the Internet, the Games, the devices, If not foe them wanting uptodate equitment, I would not be in a Position I am today,
To me the housing industry set me back, it may have been cheaper to own a house but running the house and Licing was not, I made my money in the 90's and then increase that in 2000's. thru modern tech,
I did not start to aquire realestate as in multiple until the late 90's early 2000's after I made some money. Also helped that in the 80's my wife was able to gain qualifications and started to work.


And I will tell it was Luck I sold stock before a decline to buy some land pure luck, if I kept the stock I would lost money.
 

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Norm Smith Medallist
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You think I can afford to start a family? You think I can take on that financial responsibility when most worker protections are stripped away and unions have been gutted leaving me at the mercy of my employer?
Whats changed apart improve working conditions, cost of living improvements,
Do you think that every person starts out with spare money to live on,
Every generation has one thing in commen when you start out you need to work hard,
He a big hint unless you come from Money there is no Free ride nor has there ever been,
Yea hoseing was cheap, but getting the deposit was not, There was no first home buyers it was a 20% deposit up front, Not too many poeple had that.
Most Boomers brought there homes in the 90's when the Government started 1st home owners schemes, until then they were renting most of my family where Living in Housing Trust homes,
Back then you try to get into UNI when you come from a public school, you try to buy a house when you worked in a basic job which 80% of Australian did, the best we could hope for was an apprenticship, and That only if you did not get conscripted.

Again Every generation is the same you have to work hard. If you want thing in life. and there are no Free rides
 

MarcusP2

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Whats changed apart improve working conditions, cost of living improvements,
Do you think that every person starts out with spare money to live on,
Every generation has one thing in commen when you start out you need to work hard,
He a big hint unless you come from Money there is no Free ride nor has there ever been,
Yea hoseing was cheap, but getting the deposit was not, There was no first home buyers it was a 20% deposit up front, Not too many poeple had that.
Most Boomers brought there homes in the 90's when the Government started 1st home owners schemes, until then they were renting most of my family where Living in Housing Trust homes,
Back then you try to get into UNI when you come from a public school, you try to buy a house when you worked in a basic job which 80% of Australian did, the best we could hope for was an apprenticship, and That only if you did not get conscripted.

Again Every generation is the same you have to work hard. If you want thing in life. and there are no Free rides
Actually:
until the late 90's early 2000's after I made some money.
Best time in history to buy a house.
Back then you try to get into UNI
Free.
you try to buy a house when you worked in a basic job which 80% of Australian did
Doable. Parents bought a 900 sqm 5 bed 2 bath house 5km from the CBD in the 80s as a fitter and turner and a part-time nurse with 2 kids. It has since gone up in value more than 10 times.

Whats changed
....where to start?
 

xchadders

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They are always recorded as heart attacks, because they are heart attacks...
Thats cause many boomers are fu**in clueless when it comes to using modern tech..

My old man came top of his class of 40 students in year 12 high school... went to uni, studied architecture.. went on to own his own architecture and construction firm for 50 years until he retired a couple of years back..

He’s had Iphone’s for 10 years now.. do you think he knows how to send a picture message to anyone with it?...

View attachment 962631

Instagram?... no chance!..
Here you go.

🎣
 

ABAB

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A place holder topic so endless, pointless arguments can gtfo of footy topics.

Have at it.
How to correctly manage generation Z players is a footy topic. Hinkley is a very good at this but to an extent that they seem to get too comfortable with him. Nicks was also hired based on how good he is at managing young players which we need right now.
 

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Norm Smith Medallist
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Actually:

Best time in history to buy a house.

Free.

Doable. Parents bought a 900 sqm 5 bed 2 bath house 5km from the CBD in the 80s as a fitter and turner and a part-time nurse with 2 kids. It has since gone up in value more than 10 times.


....where to start?
Housing was Cheaper than today But you needed a 20% deposit which excluded 80% of the Popullation until they brought in 1st Home owners Grant,
Yopu do understand a lot of Critic blame the 1st home Owners grant for the reason we had a housing Boom, and cost of Housing Increased.

Uni were Free, for those priveleage to get into them the Select 10%, what about the the 90% who could not. big help free unoi had all that did was increase the taxes.

And I brought land in the late 90's and it too went up 10 times in value, did not have to be a Boomer to get that one.

Life hard live with but for the majority of Australian there is no Free Ride.

Again seens as some cannot work this out,
Most Boomers Could not afford Houses they could not save the 20% deposit required, Most could not afford a decent CAR,
Most Boomers did not attend UNI only the priveleage few did.
 

MarcusP2

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Housing was Cheaper than today But you needed a 20% deposit which excluded 80% of the Popullation until they brought in 1st Home owners Grant,
Yopu do understand a lot of Critic blame the 1st home Owners grant for the reason we had a housing Boom, and cost of Housing Increased.

Uni were Free, for those priveleage to get into them the Select 10%, what about the the 90% who could not. big help free unoi had all that did was increase the taxes.

And I brought land in the late 90's and it too went up 10 times in value, did not have to be a Boomer to get that one.

Life hard live with but for the majority of Australian there is no Free Ride.

Again seens as some cannot work this out,
Most Boomers Could not afford Houses they could not save the 20% deposit required, Most could not afford a decent CAR,
Most Boomers did not attend UNI only the priveleage few did.
Actually, who had money to buy land in the 90s (as you said had to save a big deposit?) Gen Xs been smashed by the 'recession we had to have'? I don't think so.

A 10% deposit today on a median house is the entire purchase price of a house in the 80s. The price of housing has so outpaced income growth and all other factors that all of this about 'interest rates' '20% deposit' etc is noise.

And regarding uni - a tertiary education expected for many jobs that no longer required one, so that doesn't hold water. My grandfather retired at 55 on a full government pension after a career as a school principal without a bachelor's degree (my grandmother still lives off that pension 35 years later). That's just one example of things that have changed.
 

Vhaluus

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Whats changed apart improve working conditions, cost of living improvements,
Do you think that every person starts out with spare money to live on,
Every generation has one thing in commen when you start out you need to work hard,
He a big hint unless you come from Money there is no Free ride nor has there ever been,
Yea hoseing was cheap, but getting the deposit was not, There was no first home buyers it was a 20% deposit up front, Not too many poeple had that.
Most Boomers brought there homes in the 90's when the Government started 1st home owners schemes, until then they were renting most of my family where Living in Housing Trust homes,
Back then you try to get into UNI when you come from a public school, you try to buy a house when you worked in a basic job which 80% of Australian did, the best we could hope for was an apprenticship, and That only if you did not get conscripted.

Again Every generation is the same you have to work hard. If you want thing in life. and there are no Free rides
You realized that numerous studies have shown the first home buyers grant actually does nothing to help first home buyers because all it does is increase the cost of buying a house by whatever the first home buyers grant is at the time? So lets not pretend there's any leg up we're getting from it, it's just another weight around our necks and a way to funnel even more taxpayer money into the hands of those who already have significant wealth.

It's funny you mention housing trust homes because you know what there are less of as a portion of population? government housing.

I'll acknowledge, again, that getting into uni was much harder back then (and I'm guessing the curriculum much more rigorous as well). But I'm sure you'll also acknowledge that back then you didn't NEED a university degree to get any job that wasn't working customer service at McDonalds or Woolworths (or obviously the ancient equivalents).

It's interesting you claim that Boombers bought in the 90's with the first home buyers scheme because
1)there wasn't any form of first home buyers grant I can find in the 90's, earliest I can find is the First Home Owners Grant in 2000
2)in 2000 the first home buyers grant was $7,000 compared to a median house price in Melbourne of $280,000 (2.5%). By 2016 the median house price in Melbourne had ballooned to $1,200,000 while the first home buyers grant remained the same (.58%).
 

jenny61_99

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Housing was Cheaper than today But you needed a 20% deposit which excluded 80% of the Popullation until they brought in 1st Home owners Grant,
Yopu do understand a lot of Critic blame the 1st home Owners grant for the reason we had a housing Boom, and cost of Housing Increased.

Uni were Free, for those priveleage to get into them the Select 10%, what about the the 90% who could not. big help free unoi had all that did was increase the taxes.

And I brought land in the late 90's and it too went up 10 times in value, did not have to be a Boomer to get that one.

Life hard live with but for the majority of Australian there is no Free Ride.

Again seens as some cannot work this out,
Most Boomers Could not afford Houses they could not save the 20% deposit required, Most could not afford a decent CAR,
Most Boomers did not attend UNI only the priveleage few did.
My first pay was $80 a week and that was working 6.5 days (including a Sunday which was double time). Rent back then was $47 a week for a fully furnished 2 bedroom flat. You had no telephone. My first car cost $500 (9 year old 1969 mini - rally converted) and petrol was 42 cents a litre. I remember being sent my first bankcard (without ever having applied for it) with a $300 limit and getting my first hifi on hire-purchase. Hubby and I saved $20,000 which would have been a good deposit on a house (in fact, we could have bought a 3 bedroom brand new house in Canberra back then for $49,000. We baulked because we were moving overseas and wasn't sure if we'd need the money. In the end we did need the money (had to pay 6 months in advance for rent - TWICE, because we were foreigners). By the time we returned to Australia, that same house was worth $160,000. My mum sold her ex-govie for about that price ($160,000) and it is now worth around the million mark (inner city Canberra). We rented for 14 years before we could afford to buy our first home - I'd just turned 30. We definitely made money on our house... but probably not if you included 15 years of repayments.

Kids earn a sh*t load more than we did at the same age... but cost of living is also expensive. Is it all relative?
 

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Maddogmetro

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Housing was Cheaper than today But you needed a 20% deposit which excluded 80% of the Popullation until they brought in 1st Home owners Grant,
Yopu do understand a lot of Critic blame the 1st home Owners grant for the reason we had a housing Boom, and cost of Housing Increased.

Uni were Free, for those priveleage to get into them the Select 10%, what about the the 90% who could not. big help free unoi had all that did was increase the taxes.

And I brought land in the late 90's and it too went up 10 times in value, did not have to be a Boomer to get that one.

Life hard live with but for the majority of Australian there is no Free Ride.

Again seens as some cannot work this out,
Most Boomers Could not afford Houses they could not save the 20% deposit required, Most could not afford a decent CAR,
Most Boomers did not attend UNI only the priveleage few did.
First home owners grant barely covers stamp duty these days (if it even does). Stamp duty is on value of property. So much higher these days.

10% of $530,000 ($53,000) as a MINIMUM for a deposit these days is much more than 20% of $25,000 ($5,000) being value of houses back then, even accounting for inflation. The fact that the cost of housing was about 3 times the average wage, compared now to more like 7-8 times the average wage, says everything you need to know.

So you bought land in 90s, which went up in value. You did have to be a boomer (or similar era) to get the benefit of this, or at least a majority of people did. Obviously there are individual examples, but that is not relevant to this discussion, because the issue is with the generational inequalities (not anecdotal evidence of individual examples).

It is not like a millennial could have purchased a property in the 90s when they were 5 years old. And boomers continue to get the benefit by purchasing investment properties using the equity in those properties, and then receiving negative gearing benefits.

The old 'just work hard' argument is stupid. It is not about working hard, it is about the fundamental inequalities that exist and the lack of benefit that is received from newer generations from the same 'hard work'.

And then you talk about the 'privileged' only being able to attend uni. How about the fact that it was free, when now there is debt in which interest is calculated on a commercial rate, and that the chance of obtaining work as a result of those degrees is lower, not to mention the wages being offered for previously high-paying roles being much lower aswell.

Every single argument you put forward has massive flaws, and is nothing but an attempt to defend a generation (that I assume you belong in), when the facts are entirely against you.
 

Maddogmetro

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My first pay was $80 a week and that was working 6.5 days (including a Sunday which was double time). Rent back then was $47 a week for a fully furnished 2 bedroom flat. You had no telephone. My first car cost $500 (9 year old 1969 mini - rally converted) and petrol was 42 cents a litre. I remember being sent my first bankcard (without ever having applied for it) with a $300 limit and getting my first hifi on hire-purchase. Hubby and I saved $20,000 which would have been a good deposit on a house (in fact, we could have bought a 3 bedroom brand new house in Canberra back then for $49,000. We baulked because we were moving overseas and wasn't sure if we'd need the money. In the end we did need the money (had to pay 6 months in advance for rent - TWICE, because we were foreigners). By the time we returned to Australia, that same house was worth $160,000. My mum sold her ex-govie for about that price ($160,000) and it is now worth around the million mark (inner city Canberra). We rented for 14 years before we could afford to buy our first home - I'd just turned 30. We definitely made money on our house... but probably not if you included 15 years of repayments.

Kids earn a sh*t load more than we did at the same age... but cost of living is also expensive. Is it all relative?
This is called inflation. The way to properly assess this is to look at the cost of things (in this case, cost of living including housing) as a factor of the average wage. All statistics point to the boomer generation having it easier, and that does not even take into account all of the other financial benefits that boomers have received that are not available to newer generations.
 

MarcusP2

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My first pay was $80 a week and that was working 6.5 days (including a Sunday which was double time). Rent back then was $47 a week for a fully furnished 2 bedroom flat. You had no telephone. My first car cost $500 (9 year old 1969 mini - rally converted) and petrol was 42 cents a litre. I remember being sent my first bankcard (without ever having applied for it) with a $300 limit and getting my first hifi on hire-purchase. Hubby and I saved $20,000 which would have been a good deposit on a house (in fact, we could have bought a 3 bedroom brand new house in Canberra back then for $49,000. We baulked because we were moving overseas and wasn't sure if we'd need the money. In the end we did need the money (had to pay 6 months in advance for rent - TWICE, because we were foreigners). By the time we returned to Australia, that same house was worth $160,000. My mum sold her ex-govie for about that price ($160,000) and it is now worth around the million mark (inner city Canberra). We rented for 14 years before we could afford to buy our first home - I'd just turned 30. We definitely made money on our house... but probably not if you included 15 years of repayments.

Kids earn a sh*t load more than we did at the same age... but cost of living is also expensive. Is it all relative?
The minimum wage in 1978 was $3 an hour, or $120/week normal time. So if you were getting paid $80 a week for working 6.5 days (lets say the equivalent of 7.5 8 hour days or 60 hours, which would be $180 at min wage) you seem to have been paying a lot of tax.

And cost of living (especially housing) has outpaced income growth for the last 20-30 years. Minimum wage is now $20 an hour (6.5x 1978), but the median rent in Canberra (e.g. not a fully furnished home) is $470 (10x what yours was).
 

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Norm Smith Medallist
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First home owners grant barely covers stamp duty these days (if it even does). Stamp duty is on value of property. So much higher these days.

10% of $530,000 ($53,000) as a MINIMUM for a deposit these days is much more than 20% of $25,000 ($5,000) being value of houses back then, even accounting for inflation. The fact that the cost of housing was about 3 times the average wage, compared now to more like 7-8 times the average wage, says everything you need to know.

So you bought land in 90s, which went up in value. You did have to be a boomer (or similar era) to get the benefit of this, or at least a majority of people did. Obviously there are individual examples, but that is not relevant to this discussion, because the issue is with the generational inequalities (not anecdotal evidence of individual examples).

It is not like a millennial could have purchased a property in the 90s when they were 5 years old. And boomers continue to get the benefit by purchasing investment properties using the equity in those properties, and then receiving negative gearing benefits.

The old 'just work hard' argument is stupid. It is not about working hard, it is about the fundamental inequalities that exist and the lack of benefit that is received from newer generations from the same 'hard work'.

And then you talk about the 'privileged' only being able to attend uni. How about the fact that it was free, when now there is debt in which interest is calculated on a commercial rate, and that the chance of obtaining work as a result of those degrees is lower, not to mention the wages being offered for previously high-paying roles being much lower aswell.

Every single argument you put forward has massive flaws, and is nothing but an attempt to defend a generation (that I assume you belong in), when the facts are entirely against you.
Brought land in the Late 90's early 2000's And I believe that was the period of the comming of age for the millenniums or the echo boomer, gen y's

And I mention get the deposit was beyound most Australians back them because it was 20% depsit, Due to the Cost Of Living, most could not afford to go on a holiday, up the murray let anlone overseas, there was a reason the government brought in the 1st home owners.

Again no Generation recieved a free ride, from the boomer to the Gen Z, if you want the good things in life you have to work for them Nothing Free,
 

Maddogmetro

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Brought land in the Late 90's early 2000's And I believe that was the period of the comming of age for the millenniums or the echo boomer, gen y's

And I mention get the deposit was beyound most Australians back them because it was 20% depsit, Due to the Cost Of Living, most could not afford to go on a holiday, up the murray let anlone overseas, there was a reason the government brought in the 1st home owners.

Again no Generation recieved a free ride, from the boomer to the Gen Z, if you want the good things in life you have to work for them Nothing Free,
Nobody is claiming that things should be free or that you don't have to work hard for things. The arguments are facts that boomers received financial benefits that newer generations could not ever dream of receiving.

Trust me, your claim of 'most Australians couldn't afford them back then' (of which you have not provided any information other than your own observations) is nothing compared to the difficulty faced by young Australians to enter the housing market now (which difficulties have been highlighted in all our posts above and backed by statistics).

Take those blinkers off. Imagine if your 'hard work' that you keep referring to resulted in none of the benefits you have actually received, including the ability to buy property. Because that is what young people face now.
 

Vhaluus

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Brought land in the Late 90's early 2000's And I believe that was the period of the comming of age for the millenniums or the echo boomer, gen y's

And I mention get the deposit was beyound most Australians back them because it was 20% depsit, Due to the Cost Of Living, most could not afford to go on a holiday, up the murray let anlone overseas, there was a reason the government brought in the 1st home owners.

Again no Generation recieved a free ride, from the boomer to the Gen Z, if you want the good things in life you have to work for them Nothing Free,
1)no most millennials were not coming of age around then. I was 13 in the year 2000 and I'm towards the older end of millennials.

2)Again, since you ignored my other post, the first home buyers wasn't introduced until the year 2000

3)No the government didn't introduce the first home buyers because people couldn't afford houses, it was to offset the introduction of the GST and the effect it would have on the housing economy.

4)no one has said the Boomers got an absolutely 'free ride'. But they did have a disproportionately EASIER ride. They have also spent their entire adult lives actively making the lives of those who follow worse to ensure their ride keeps getting even easier. Even in the twilight of their lifetime they are still a huge obstacle to progress, both social and economical that could help create a slightly brighter future (e.g. climate change)
 

MarcusP2

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Again no Generation recieved a free ride, from the boomer to the Gen Z, if you want the good things in life you have to work for them Nothing Free,
A boomer that following the 'get job, get married, buy house path' is likely to end up a multimillionaire living off franking credits, if no other stupid choices were made.

A millenial that did the same is hoping to be debt-free by the time they retire.

 

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1)no most millennials were not coming of age around then. I was 13 in the year 2000 and I'm towards the older end of millennials.

2)Again, since you ignored my other post, the first home buyers wasn't introduced until the year 2000

3)No the government didn't introduce the first home buyers because people couldn't afford houses, it was to offset the introduction of the GST and the effect it would have on the housing economy.

4)no one has said the Boomers got an absolutely 'free ride'. But they did have a disproportionately EASIER ride. They have also spent their entire adult lives actively making the lives of those who follow worse to ensure their ride keeps getting even easier. Even in the twilight of their lifetime they are still a huge obstacle to progress, both social and economical that could help create a slightly brighter future (e.g. climate change)
I ignore you post because it was wrong by the way. but I was also incorrect in how I protray the FHOG.
My big mistake saying it was a 1st home omnwer grant, What I should have mention was Bob Hawke First Home Owners Assistance Scheme 1983, which was abolished in 1990 and later replaced by the FHOG, prior to that it was all grants after a person brought the House
So if anything getting a home in 90's was harder. Added to the 17% intrest rates, And Yes I brought land in the late 90's because I had the money then to do so, I had to work non stop for close to 30 years before that could happen. but yes I recieved a free ride,
 

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Norm Smith Medallist
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OK Guys I get it my generation was the Lucky one we got a free ride,
Guess I will tell that one to my Mate next time I vist the memorial. thanks for the memories Guys,

Again no generation got a free ride, and it was in reply to the boomer getting a free ride that force me to comment in the first place.

Again Thanks for the Memorys of the Free ride me and my mates recieved.
 

Maddogmetro

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I ignore you post because it was wrong by the way. but I was also incorrect in how I protray the FHOG.
My big mistake saying it was a 1st home omnwer grant, What I should have mention was Bob Hawke First Home Owners Assistance Scheme 1983, which was abolished in 1990 and later replaced by the FHOG, prior to that it was all grants after a person brought the House
So if anything getting a home in 90's was harder. Added to the 17% intrest rates, And Yes I brought land in the late 90's because I had the money then to do so, I had to work non stop for close to 30 years before that could happen. but yes I recieved a free ride,
You have a hard time separating personal anecdotal evidence with overall statistics.

And you seem to think that, if you accept the facts, it downplays your 'hard work'. Nobody said you didn't work hard. This is a weird 'chip on the shoulder' thing that so many boomers can't seem to get past.
 

Maddogmetro

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OK Guys I get it my generation was the Lucky one we got a free ride,
Guess I will tell that one to my Mate next time I vist the memorial. thanks for the memories Guys,

Again no generation got a free ride, and it was in reply to the boomer getting a free ride that force me to comment in the first place.

Again Thanks for the Memorys of the Free ride me and my mates recieved.
Now you are resorting to conflating completely separate issues. The discussion is about the financial benefits, and yes financial 'free rides', that boomers received compared to other generations. Stop trying to shift the goalposts to suit your argument.
 

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