Certified Legendary Thread China History in the Making

Ishikawa

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Sydney going the indirect route to China and having Auskick camps during the holidays for Chinese-Australian kids in Sydney's south at Hurstville Public School oval. This was announced back on 21st May (back around page 380 of this thread) when the AFL announced they would open an office in Shanghai and it would start soon after the announcement. The program went for 6 weeks - the standard Auskick program length.

MATT MA won't be the game's first Brownlow medallist of Chinese heritage. He won't even play first grade for his club side.

However, Ma, originally from the city of Liaoyang in China, is determined to play a key role in growing the game he's fallen in love with since he arrived in Australia. Ma is part of the Hurstville Dragons Auskick Program, which has been run in conjunction with the Swans in Sydney's south this year.

The program is the first of its kind and has been held at Hurstville Public School. It was heavily attended by the multicultural community with many of the participants playing Australian Football for the first time. AFL Community Ambassadors like Ma and others from the Chinese community are vital to the program's success. The final session of the month-long initiative drew a massive turnout of kids and parents recently, with Sydney stars Aliir Aliir and Nick Smith on hand to lend their expert advice. Ma said the program offers far more than a kick of the footy to the participants. "It's beneficial for the kids not only in terms of their health, but it also gets them more involved in the community, and that helps them make friends," he said.................
Great story, is there much of a Chinese demographic living in Adelaide? I may be ignorant or basing off incorrect perception, but in terms of associating aggregation of Chinese migrants in Australia Sydney (in particular) and Melbourne are miles ahead of the other capital cities.
 

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Lockhart Road

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Great story, is there much of a Chinese demographic living in Adelaide? I may be ignorant or basing off incorrect perception, but in terms of associating aggregation of Chinese migrants in Australia Sydney (in particular) and Melbourne are miles ahead of the other capital cities.
The totally original version of PAFC’s China Strategy in early 2013 was to invite a few dozen Chinese students to a home game at Football Park and thereby introduce them to Australian Football. This was initiated by David Koch, whose daughter and grandchildren were living in Hong Kong at the time.

When I first actively connected to the Club, by mid 2013, I was asked by Matthew Richardson if I could assist the Club in advancing this ‘China Strategy’.

Yes, there is a Chinese demographic in Adelaide, and our connection with it should be corralled and advanced as a positive consequence of what is about to take place with the PAFC marketing infrastructure.
 

RussellEbertHandball

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Great story, is there much of a Chinese demographic living in Adelaide? I may be ignorant or basing off incorrect perception, but in terms of associating aggregation of Chinese migrants in Australia Sydney (in particular) and Melbourne are miles ahead of the other capital cities.
Outside of the student community its not a big permanent population despite there being a Chinatown in the Central Market area for 50 or 60 years, but it also contains Vietnamese, Korean, Malaysian, Thai, Japanese restaurants and culture shops.

From the stats I have seen, about 25,000 to 30,000 of the 600,000 Chinese born population in Oz live in Adelaide and SA with probably 90% in greater Adelaide. Greater Sydney and Great Melbourne account for around 2/3rds of those 600,000. Australian's with Chinese ancestry is counted at 1.2 million.
 

RussellEbertHandball

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Great story, is there much of a Chinese demographic living in Adelaide? I may be ignorant or basing off incorrect perception, but in terms of associating aggregation of Chinese migrants in Australia Sydney (in particular) and Melbourne are miles ahead of the other capital cities.
Your post and questions got me thinking today about being a bit more accurate with the spread across Oz of Chinese-Australians.

This article from The Conversation with lots of links - gives a good indication why the AFL picked Hurstville in Sydney's south to host the Auskick program.

It also highlights why a Chinese/Hong Kong property developers Jiayuan Group said they were prepared to fund and build a $300m stadium and training base facilities for the A League expansion consortium - the Southern Expansion, just south of Hurstville. They Southern Expansion bid was headed up by Les Murray, ex NSW Premier Morris Iemma and Craig Foster but missed out last December to the Macarthur South West Sydney bid backed by billionaire property developer Lang Walker.

The profile of migrants who arrived from mainland China since 2000 is changing. They are more highly skilled, educated and investment-focused than earlier migrants. Their settlement patterns in Australia are also changing. Sydney is still home to half of all China-born migrants in Australia. However, the proportion of migrants settling in other capital cities is increasing.

In Sydney in 2001, China-born residents represented over 10% of the population of only three suburbs. A decade later, the number of such suburbs had risen to 22. Smaller increases were evident in Melbourne (from one suburb in 2001 to seven in 2011) and Brisbane (zero to four). However, Hurstville was the only Australian suburb in 2011 where China-born residents represented over 25% of the population.

This suggests a pattern of settlement that is neither extreme residential segregation along ethnic lines nor full “spatial assimilation”. Rather, it is best understood in terms of multiple moderate concentrations.
......

And this 2016 Census article on the ABS site was linked either in the article above or in another one I clicked on.

The 2016 Census found Australia is home to more than 1.2 million people of Chinese ancestry. Of these, two in five (41 per cent) were born in China, with Australia the second most common country of birth (25 per cent) ahead of Malaysia (8.0 per cent) and Hong Kong (6.5 per cent). Four out of five people of Chinese ancestry (82 per cent) did not state another ancestry. Nearly half of people with Chinese ancestry (46 per cent) speak Mandarin at home, with the other most common languages being Cantonese (22 per cent) and English (18 per cent).
...........
The Australian lifestyle clearly has increasing appeal in China, with approximately half of Australian residents born in China arriving here since 2008. Sydney is the biggest draw, with two out of every five Australian residents born in China (44 per cent) living in the Greater Sydney Area. This area recorded four of the top six suburbs with the most residents born in China – Hurstville (NSW), Melbourne (Vic.), Glen Waverly (Vic.), Burwood (NSW), Campsie (NSW) and Chatswood (NSW).

and this one about suburban mix
In the 1980s and 1990s, ethnic Chinese from Hong Kong, Taiwan and the “Nanyang” countries of Southeast Asia (e.g. Singapore, Malaysia) came to Australia along with migrants from mostly southern mainland China.Since 2000, Chinese migration to Australia has been more geographically diverse in its origins. These migrants have also been increasingly advantaged in socio-economic status and often driven by tertiary education.
...................
In our study covering the three census periods from 2001 to 2011, China-born residential patterns became more diverse over time. There has been greater dispersal in the large cities (Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane) and clustering in medium and smaller cities (Adelaide, Perth, Hobart, Darwin and Canberra).

In other words, as the local population of China-born migrants gets larger and more complex, multiple Chinese enclaves emerge. These include Hurstville and Campsie in Sydney, Burwood and Clayton in Melbourne, and Sunnybank and Sunnybank Hills in Brisbane.

In the smaller capital cities of Adelaide, Hobart, Darwin and Canberra, residential clusters appear to emerge near major universities in inner cities. Here, housing markets and planning initiatives play a strong role as well. Clustering appears mostly in and around inner cities, which may be tied to the construction of high-rise unit blocks. .............


This is an interesting article on what Shanghai parents want for their kids from international education. The author interviewed 46 middle class Chinese parents about education.
 

Lockhart Road

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China marketing team?
A completely fresh look at China, profit being the focus more than the current break-even community first attitude, acknowledging and learning from the mistakes the Club has made ... as has been insisted on to the PAFC Board by Andrew Hunter for nearly a year, after certain people had been in his ear for well over a year before that.
 

Greymatter

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A completely fresh look at China, profit being the focus more than the current break-even community first attitude, acknowledging and learning from the mistakes the Club has made ... as has been insisted on to the PAFC Board by Andrew Hunter for nearly a year, after certain people had been in his ear for well over a year before that.
Is this coming from board or below?
 

Lockhart Road

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Is this coming from board or below?
Is what coming?

The information? From my sources at several levels.

The fresh approach to China? From both Board, starting with a new face as Rucci has revealed, and from below with Andrew Hunter, plus the new director, plus others via inevitable restructure, all working together.

And greater co-operation with and from the AFL now that a Shanghai office on the AustCham premises is being shared, and a China Manager in Tom Parker, reporting to Dave Stevenson, has been recruited by AFL House. Tom is ex Melbourne, was involved circa 2010 in China when the Demons were involved up here.
 

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Alberton Proud

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Poorly written but the sentiment is nice

 

RussellEbertHandball

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SEN reporting St Kilda making $1M from the game and we made $300K?

Surely not?
They got paid $700k fee to sell us the right to the game.

That is part of the $4m+ budget the club and AFL have to sell sponsorship for to pay to put on the game, ie game day partners - Tourism Australia, Vic government, SA government, Rio Tinto, Kennedy, Australia Limited, Sinopec, Stehr Tuna etc.

If the AFL over sold sponsorship they might split it with the 2 clubs, ie $300k each.

Or if the AFL didn't oversell sponsorship packages then Saint Kilda might have signed up a sponsor or two independent of AFL worth $300k or more after costs.

The game itself doesn't make a profit for us. We try and make it break even and we then try and make a profit around the game. Eg Nicho Teng's Haneco Lighting 2nd tier sponsorship of the club - and on the sleeves of the club official polo - only happened because of the China game.
 

RussellEbertHandball

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Lockhart Road, you may remember in March last year on page 295 I wrote at this post

about the articles my mate the Airport Economist wrote between 2005-08 in his Austrade blog, that usually was picked up by the print media and reproduced by them, about the AFL's push into South Africa, China, Dubai, NZ etc, plus some videos and posts from the Freo board about their South African push, and how the AFL massively cut back on international expansion, except for NZ, after North Melbourne refused to move to GC at end of 2007 and in 2008 the AFL started looking to GC and western Sydney for expansion and ploughed their resources into those new markets.

The last couple of days I have been going thru all my stuff in storage and found that I kept all the 2004 editions of the Inside Football magazine. Here is the front cover and an article on Footy's New Frontiers from the December 2004 - February 2005 Summer edition.

There are snippets about where in the world players went to with their overseas travel in the off season, and where they saw some footy being played, but the main article copied below written by Nathan Burke, was about Saint Kilda's pre season camp in South Africa, being based near Johannesburg, south west 80kms or so, in a small town of Potchefstroom, training at 1,500m altitude. Its a university town so they got to use their facilities and many northern hemisphere athletes would head south and use these facilities during the cold northern winters.

Burke, who had retired a couple of years earlier and was an assistant coach at the Saints, wrote the following on some of the development work they did;

The highlight of the camp for many was mixing with the local children at the three football clinics we ran.
The players could not help getting caught up in the boundless enthusiasm and energy the kids generated.
Even though many had little idea of our game they joined in and had a great time. In the end some players
abandoned the skills and marveled at the kids' athletic ability. Handball comps gave way to back flip comps
as the children spontaneously broke out into somersaults.


I thought part of our China push, was that we would do the odd preseason camp there. 45 Footballers would supercharge some of the Power Footy programs.



745818
745819




745820
 

RussellEbertHandball

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Around 4.30, for the 3rd time this week, have heard Rowey and Bicks read out an advert for Cathay Pacific. I assume that means they are trying to crank up sales out of Adelaide to HK and the rest of China and Asia.

Have we re-engaged with them lately? If not, why not?

It might be time to pay them a visit. I know they made two big losses in 2016 $575mil HKD and 2017 $1.259bil HKD, but had a big second half of 2018 when they walked away from Port and recorded a profit of $2.345bil HKD. They released their 2019 first half results last month and announced a half year profit of $1.347bil HKD

I hope both the club and Cathay Pacific are open to restarting what appeared to be a successful partnership.

Edit they signed on as a Premier Partner in December 2016, but got involved in the China stuff before that.

 
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RussellEbertHandball

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I watched the Trump, Morrison presser from the White House at about 2.30am this morning. Trump was at his hyperbolic rambling best. He also was fawning all over Morrison and Australia. Both got a few questions about their China relationship and trade deals.

I suspect a very very big game is being played over this PM visit to Washington. The yanks know Australlia is economically close to China, and Trump is trying to screw them down re tariffs and trying to cut the annual trade deficit from as high as $400 billion USD to something more manageable maybe down to a quarter or a fifth of that peak. Then there is defence and strategic issues re the South China Sea and the influence over small Pacific nations.No doubt there was, and is, more fawning at the state dinner that is on at the moment and would be winding up soon as I type. I will have to watch some of the news stories that come out of that.

I suspect China is listening closely to what Morrison says publicly about China, re defence, strategy and trade and how much he will back Trump and the US. He didn't say anything controversial this mornig, but he backed Trump's negotiations to get China to change their trade policies, especially on intellectual property issues. Also Trump uses Fox News as his go to channel, and Rupert being the boss, is another reason to praise Oz.

That's why its imperative we throw the kitchen sink at finding commercial sponsors out of China this year. Go back to concentrating on why Lockhart Road started this whole journey into the Middle Kingdom, to find a $1+ million a year JMS from a Chinese consumer goods company. Whilst I like playing the game in Shanghai for the opportunities it provides the club, the club has to change tact and concentrate on finding sponsors as I reckon that government to government relationship will only make it harder, which means businesses will be harder to attract.

Its why we have to go and find a GM Commercial China who is based in Shanghai or Hong Kong and knows Shanghai and China very well, can speak the language and go an negotiate deals in their language. Pay him/her more than the CEO, if need be. Trying to do this by FIFO managers based in Adelaide, wont work.
 

Janus

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In this game I’m developing, a solution to the US/China trade war is proposed where the US uses Australia as a third party proxy to deal with China in order to get around the IP transfer issue. That is, if an Australian subsidiary of an American company does business in China, it’s impossible for the Chinese to demand the IP in transfer as it’s not the Australian company’s product - they are just a proxy.

Basically how a whole bunch of Chinese companies have now set up factories in other countries to get around the tariffs, but in reverse.

That’s the solution I came up with :)
 

Lockhart Road

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Indeed REH the 2020 Shanghai match could be cancelled at any time, and that’s the end of Port Adelaide in China. No Plan B whatsoever.

On the survey I replied NO to the question that asked if I was aware of the Club’s commercial venture into China. I later pointed out, where comment was invited, that the Club’s presence in China is for community purposes only, not commercial.

What a wacky world we currently live in. Trump in Washington. Boris in London. The KGB in Moscow. Rocket Boy in DPRK. Dirty Harry in Manila. King Xi in Beijing. Lam the Ma’am in Hong Kong. Chairman Moi in Sydney. No ’’’Ken Clue at Alberton.
 

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This article is a rather long read but interesting to note the requirements for conducting business in China, especially re Taiwan.

May or may not have an impact for Port Adelaide.
 

Janus

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This article is a rather long read but interesting to note the requirements for conducting business in China, especially re Taiwan.

May or may not have an impact for Port Adelaide.
Something straight out of Black Mirror that is. Which makes sense - a black mirror is used for scrying.
 

RussellEbertHandball

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Friday in The Australian's monthly 50 page magazine, The Deal, was dedicated to doing business with China, cover title was - Why We're still doing business with China.

John Stensholt's their sports business guy, I just put his Thursday article in the OAK thread, wrote about how China is proving a big winner for Tennis Australia. I have written about what Tennis Australia are doing in China before in here, they already have an office in Shanghai and Hong Kong and this year have opened up an office in Chengdu, to be close to their sponsor 1573 / Luzhou Laojiao's headquarters, who have paid $45m over 5 years to sponsor the Australian Open.

I've said it before in a few posts, but we have to use Darren Cahill, Roger Rasheed, Thanasi Kokkinakis and any other tennis players and coaches with an international reputation who are Port fans to link in with and piggy back off, what Tennis Australia are doing in China. TA are building a template we can use.

Courting the Middle Kingdom
The country’s huge middle class is hungry for sport — and travel — and it’s proving a winner for Tennis Australia.


It is a record sponsorship deal with a previously unknown liquor brand, and it represents a huge breakthrough for Tennis Australia in its quest to do major business in China. But the deal, which almost had an inauspicious beginning on the eve of January’s Australian Open, encapsulates how corporate and sporting leaders from each country are still learning how to do business with each other. Last October, TA officials clinched the sponsorship deal with Chinese liquor brand Luzhou Laojiao, which signed as an associate partner of the Open for the first time in 2019. It was a deal at least on par with major sponsor Kia’s minimum $16 million-a-year arrangement. It was a huge contract that took a year to negotiate. Australian tennis officials and Luzhou Laojiao executives, who run a company that dates to 1573 and is a leader in Chinese baijiu drinking culture, were extremely excited about it.
.......
It is also proof of how quickly China has become an important part of TA’s corporate strategy in its quest to make the Open the biggest sports and entertainment event in the world, and how the sporting body has accelerated its business focus on the region, and particularly China, in the past few years. Geographically, Australia is in an ideal time zone to broadcast primetime tennis into Asia and it is an ideal tourist destination. While the event is usually a ratings winner locally and crowds flock to Melbourne Park, the Open’s status as one of only four Grand Slam tennis events points to growth opportunities abroad. “We can’t keep growing the Open at the rate we have been in a country of only 25 million people, so we have to be outwardly focused,” says Slack, who adds that half the spectators at Melbourne Park already come from interstate or overseas.
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TA now has 10 permanent staff working on the Chinese mainland and in Hong Kong, most of them in Shanghai. It has also opened an office in Chengdu, which is about an hour from Luzhou in the Sichuan province and the closest main commercial centre.

The Australian Open has a partnership with Ctrip, the nation’s biggest online travel agent, and three big Chinese sponsors in Luzhou Laojiao, Shenzhen water company Ganten and furniture and bedding company DeRUCCI. Combined they pay upwards of $25 million annually to associate their brands with the event. One court was even renamed the 1573 Arena for the 2019 tournament. TA has put considerable effort into its Chinese social media presence. Five special hashtags on Weibo generated 803 million views for the Open this year, including 24 million views of actor Hu Ge at the men’s final. There are also more than one million followers of the Australian Open Weibo account.

Technology has also helped from a broadcasting and sponsorship point of view, with TA now producing the broadcast so it can tailor vision for viewers in particular countries, showing courts and action meeting their specific interest, and for sponsors. [see link below]
.....
Ganten, the Chinese water brand, is a case in point. Now the Open’s official water partner, the brand first sounded out TA for sponsorship opportunities three years ago. With the water category already taken, tennis officials offered Ganten virtual signage by placing its brand on the umpire’s chair in a feed shown only on its Chinese broadcast. Viewers and spectators in Australia were none the wiser. “It was a great stepping stone in bringing Ganten in [as an overall partner] and eventually they became a global partner,” says Slack. “They loved the umpire’s chair so much they took it physically [as sponsorship signage] as well.”
.......

It was a similar story with the courtside sign showing the speeds of players’ serves. TA sold virtual signage packages to sponsors such as Mastercard, which wanted a China-specific message, through to Ctrip.

From next year onwards, TA wants to introduce the virtual signage sponsorship potential across all of its courts for its coverage across the world. Big names like Kia, Mastercard and Rolex may want to be seen in every market, Slack says, but there are plenty of other opportunities in other categories to tailor the branding to specific markets such as China.

The Luzhou Laojiao deal came through via more traditional sporting diplomacy — though there was also a technological twist.

In 2016 Victoria entered into a sister-state agreement with Sichuan, one of China’s fastest-growing regions. Government officials asked TA for some help with the relationship, which led to the introduction of the junior training “Hot Shots” program into Chengdu schools through the federal government’s Asian Sport Partnership. “Someone from that introduced us to someone else who introduced us to Luzhou Laojiao,” says Slack.
........
“And that’s where that relationship began. It proved something to us, because sometimes when you’re trialing a couple of different things and thinking should we do a schools program or something else, you’re wondering where this is going to lead. As long as you limit your exposure you’ve got to jump in on some stuff and it proves to us that these things could lead to this.” After months of talks, the deal was clinched when TA hired out a Shanghai ballroom and flew Luzhou Laojiao management in for a pitch with LED screens all around the room and a huge virtual presentation of what the Australian Open’s mixture of sport, entertainment and music looked like. It proved to be a successful sales strategy. The deal is also about making Luzhou Laojiao more relevant in China. While the company has a 500-year, baijiu-based heritage, Slack says it needed to start shifting away from a consumer who has been part of the predominately older, male business-room drinking culture to a modern tennis fan.
.......
“The modern consumer in China is 25 to 35 years old, young family, wanting to travel and digital-savvy,” says Slack. “It’s very different. They need to be contemporary and modern so there’s this shared value where, while we’re not 500 years old, we’ve got this heritage and culture of a sport but also we need to be contemporary and modern to the consumer as well.” TA has funded a series of Chinese sport and executive events in the lead-up to the Open, led by the Australian Open Asia-Pacific Wildcard playoff each year in Zhuhai that grants the winners a place in the main Open draw.
.................
There is also the Belt and Road Chengdu-Australian Open University Tennis Championship held annually in Chengdu, the winners of which travel to Melbourne for a cultural exchange. The new Australian Open China Challenge is a 10-city, 500-player amateur event for corporate tennis teams, held in cities such as Xi’an, Beijing and Chengdu. It will see tournaments run with TA staff culminating in the 10 winners competing for an overall prize in Melbourne during next year’s Australian Open.
...........
But it is the Luzhou Laojiao deal that is the most important move in China for tennis yet. More commercial deals are in the offing, but Slack says of the partnership with the liquor brand: “It was a big moment for our China operations and proof of what we were doing.”

Mr Gui isn't quite our Luzhou Laojiao, but he has given us a great opportunity to find our Luzhou Laojiao. We just haven't been smart enough yet.

Near the end of the Oz open in January, John Stensholt had an article in the Oz about this Virtual reality advertising boards courtside being integrated into the Chinese TV coverage and I put some of the article and comments at this post in this thread.

 

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