Opinion Commentary & Media III

Status
Not open for further replies.

Snake_Baker

L'enfant terrible
Apr 24, 2013
51,819
99,815
inside your head
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
The Unicornia Reactants
Taking the specific gender issue out of the equation the baffling thing is that it means fox can no longer boast of having the best X while also depriving the competition of it. Just seems a bizarre move from a marketing point of view. I simply have to assume she wanted more than they thought she was worth.

Then when you consider the gender aspect it becomes more baffling, because firstly the talent pool is so small, secondly they typically have much different personalities and approaches than the stereotypical ex-AFL player or egotistical male MSM hack which is a refreshing change for many, and thirdly because there will be some number of viewers who will see it solely as Fox axing an already under represented demographic in favour of 'the most privileged' demographics and then throw a tanty and potentially stop using some services.

It's all just a bit odd tbh. Bit of a 'watch this space' event.

And while I don't personally care too much about her being female, it does irk me that they're backing in the same old cliche and ego driven frauds that they have for decades. Different isn't always good. but in this case her approach to her job and personality was a nice change of flavour in a stale product that is well past it's best-before date. I don't even really rate her super highly as a presenter overall, it's more a case of her male contemporaries and the tactics of the media/broadcast companies being ******* awful, seemingly as a rule.

I grew up with the vaudevillian style entertainment that came with World of Sport, and in my opinion, ALL AFL media has gone backwards since those days due to the rise of virtue signaling pompous twats who take themselves far too seriously, and whose modus operandi is delivering manufactured drivel in an over emphatic manner, with fu** all in the way of actual insight.

Calling them wooden is an insult to trees.

Meadows definitely fits in that same category. Her gender is completely and utterly irrelevant, as it should be.
 
Last edited:

(Log in to remove this ad.)

see see

And don't forget the joker...
May 30, 2007
8,640
25,241
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
Deportivo Wanka
Profile of the Sociopath
  • Glibness and Superficial Charm.
  • Manipulative and Conning. They never recognize the rights of others and see their self-serving behaviors as permissible.
  • Grandiose Sense of Self.
  • Pathological Lying.
  • Lack of Remorse, Shame or Guilt.
  • Shallow Emotions.
  • Incapacity for Love.
  • Need for Stimulation.
Sound familiar?
Very familiar. Looks like the CV of the overwhelming majority of managing partners at professional services firms.
 

giantroo

Bleeding Blue and White
Sep 23, 2005
63,781
115,564
Melbourne
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
Arsenal, Chicago Bulls
David Schwarz and Mark Allen set to make return to Macquarie Sports Radio
Fans of radio hosts David Schwarz and Mark Allen were up in arms when the popular pair’s Ox and Marko drive show was cancelled by Macquarie Sports Radio. Has the station heard them?

Scott Gullan, Herald Sun
November 4, 2019 12:08pm



People power has spoken with dumped radio hosts David Schwarz and Mark Allen set for a stunning resurrection.

It’s believed the popular Ox and Marko drive show will return to Macquarie Sports Radio within a fortnight.

This backflip by Macquarie management comes a week after the station scaled back its talkback format, sacking all of its host including the former SEN stalwarts.

A day after last week’s axing Allen revealed that he was faced with a second battle of lung cancer.

The outpouring of goodwill towards Schwarz and Allen last week is behind the change of mind.

Macquarie Media has been dramatically cost cutting as a result of its merger with Channel Nine.

Executive Chairman Russell Tate didn’t want to elaborate on the Ox and Marco development when contacted today.

“I won’t be making comment,” Tate said. “There will be plenty of announcements in due course.”
 

Twinkletoes

Moderator
Jan 28, 2004
38,678
59,843
Tender Touch
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
MVFC, Storm, Everton, Socceroos

(Log in to remove this ad.)

giantroo

Bleeding Blue and White
Sep 23, 2005
63,781
115,564
Melbourne
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
Arsenal, Chicago Bulls
Normal scheduling is now resumed.

Heard Ben Amarfio being discussed on SEN this morning between 8.30 and 9 if you can find the recording giantroo.
1hr 53m.30s in

 

Twinkletoes

Moderator
Jan 28, 2004
38,678
59,843
Tender Touch
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
MVFC, Storm, Everton, Socceroos
1hr 53m.30s in

Thanks mate
 

lockheed

Club Legend
Oct 22, 2005
1,188
1,958
Night Vale
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
North Melbourne
The anti-North spin continues -
BARRETT: Can these new leaders stop a shaky North from heading south? -
The mid to late 2000s were tumultuous for North Melbourne. Financially haemorrhaging and fractured within its operations, the AFL was desperate to move it to the Gold Coast. A new chairman, new CEO and new coach somehow gained stability - for eight years, anyway. But the Roos are back in a vulnerable place. A new coach, new CEO and new footy operations boss are about to team up with a chairman, who along with a former director, has ruthlessly applied a figurative flamethrower to operations – actions they deemed not just necessary but crucial to the future. Once again – yet again - it is make or break time for the Roos. And while it was Gold Coast last time, it is Tasmania this time, when it comes to the AFL's geographical foothold plans. DAMIAN BARRETT delves deep into the club's latest turmoil.

IT'S THE halfway point of the 2016 season.

North Melbourne, coming off preliminary final finishes in 2014 and 2015, has just defeated Richmond by 70 points in Hobart and is a game clear on top of the ladder with a 10-1 scoreline.

Eleven matches later, the Roos have won just twice more. Club icon Brent Harvey, along with the equally loved Drew Petrie, Michael Firrito and Nick Dal Santo have all had their careers ended in decisions which may have been right but embarrassingly poorly delivered to the individuals and public.

That year's flag is won by the Western Bulldogs. Richmond wins in 2017, a season in which North finishes 15th and re-contracts its coach Brad Scott all the way through to the end of 2020.

Less than half that deal later, early in the 2019 season, Scott is exited. At the same time, North Melbourne chairman Ben Buckley decides the chief executive officer and general manager of football, Carl Dilena and Cam Joyce, will also be departing.

Financial arrangements pertaining to Scott, Dilena and assistant coach Leigh Tudor, who has also parted, will tally about $1.5 million on the 2020 books.

That is serious impost for Ben Amarfio, even before he walks in to the club later this month as its new CEO.

North Melbourne is heading into the future with three new faces in its three key administrative positions - Amarfio, Rhyce Shaw as coach and Brady Rawlings as general manager of football.

The regularly struggling club - the one which took 50 years to win its first VFL premiership, which was forced into a private ownership structure in the 1980s as a last-resort survival project, which the AFL was desperate to move to the Gold Coast in the late 2000s – is again in a vulnerable state.

AFL headquarters has been an interested, and occasionally concerned, observer of the North Melbourne goings-on this year.

That the AFL needs to, after 2021 when deals to play games in Tasmania by North Melbourne (Hobart) and Hawthorn (Launceston) expire, finally and emphatically resolve its own business strategy in the Apple Isle is both a worrying and exciting backdrop for the Roos as they attempt to work their way out of their latest period of uncertainty.

There is clearly a deal to be made for North in Tasmania, a potentially lucrative one which could see the club maintain an 11 "home" game arrangement in Melbourne as well as servicing eight or nine matches in Hobart and Launceston.

Unless the club quickly regains authoritative control of its own operations, though, any deal will be made on its behalf.

The AFL has provided public encouragement to a consortium seeking a fresh licence for the state. But it is far from convinced that a new licence is the solution for the region.

Hawthorn is believed to be open to an exit provided it gets financial encouragement to do so, in order to partially fund its new facility at Dingley.

Which would leave North Melbourne as the focus of AFL plans outside Victoria. Again.

In late May after removing Scott, North Melbourne ordered a football department review, conducted by then-Roos board member Brian Walsh, ex-director Glenn Archer and former KPMG chairman Peter Nash.

Even as that review was unfolding, Archer, who had recently stepped off the North board, and Buckley instigated approaches and offers to ex-North players and recent premiership coaches in Adam Simpson, Alastair Clarkson and John Longmire.

The questions had to be asked. All said no, despite telephone number financial incentives. Just as big-name players like Dustin Martin, Josh Kelly, Jordan De Goey and others had done. Tom Lynch wouldn't even take a phone call.

The outcome of the initial review revealed a need to focus on culture and football, and an initial round of interviews for the CEO position saw ex-Fremantle CEO Steve Rosich emerge as a frontrunner.

But some powerbrokers demanded a re-think.

Former North player and director Mark Brayshaw, currently CEO of the AFL Coaches Association, was always in the picture too, his mix of knowing the club intricately and intimately, as well as ticking the boxes of culture and football, making him a strong candidate.

Subsequent analysis of its situation then swung focus back to commercial and corporate facets, where Amarfio, who was a very popular boss of Triple M for five years and also drove the extraordinary financial deals secured by Australian cricket when in senior management at Cricket Australia, presented as the person for the future.

Just as Shaw had done to Buckley and Archer when he started winning matches after taking over from Scott.

North believes the appointment of Shaw will be proven to be a masterstroke, and he has impressed every single person at the club, partially due to a highly unusual quality for a person holding a senior position in AFL clubland – that of being refreshingly prepared to openly concede deficiencies in his make-up.

He is said to be well aware of shortcomings, but fastidiously committed to rectifying all of them, and has already been lauded for an inclusive all-club approach.

In 2016, when James Brayshaw's nine seasons as chairman expired and Buckley took over, there was a clear change in outlook, an appetite to focus on the now and to not be burdened by potential future ramifications relating to those decisions.

A 12-win 2018 season not only exceeded expectations, but gave Buckley confidence his outlook was right. Another recruiting spree was ordered, which secured Jared Polec, Aaron Hall, Dom Tyson and Jasper Pittard.

Scott's view of list management didn't match Buckley's, and when he presented to the North Melbourne board in May this year, so strong was he that the Roos needed to think deeply into the future that some directors felt he was saying to them that he wanted out.

He didn't. He was simply seeking clarity and thorough consideration on the future direction of the football department. But the fact he was asking questions led some to believe he was not sufficiently demonstrating a desire to continue.

Scott knew early in 2019 that he wouldn't be serving the 2020 year of his deal, and had privately prepared with Dilena an amicable and well-planned separation, quite possibly with Shaw as the nominated successor.

But Buckley moved in the week leading into the round 10 match against Western Bulldogs, thus ending plans for an orderly exit.

At that stage, Roos directors felt Scott would be coaching another club in 2020. Some were convinced it would be St Kilda, but a couple felt it would be Carlton.

Instead, in 2020 Scott is likely to be immersed in a wide-ranging, strategically significant role with the AFL.

Of equal significance to the Tasmania project for Amarfio is a need to secure for the Roos a sizeable chunk of land and freehold opportunities within the massive redevelopment of the suburb of North Melbourne and its train stations.

The past six months have been tumultuous for North as Buckley and Archer set about blowing up a past they had both had a say in as directors of the club.

They were convinced massive change was required and as stakeholders had rights to enforce it.

The future is on their heads, more than it is the three newbies – Shaw, Amarfio and Rawlings.
 

Passmore

Norm Smith Medallist
May 22, 2001
9,772
20,333
The Gasometer Wing
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
Norf
The anti-North spin continues -
BARRETT: Can these new leaders stop a shaky North from heading south? -
The mid to late 2000s were tumultuous for North Melbourne. Financially haemorrhaging and fractured within its operations, the AFL was desperate to move it to the Gold Coast. A new chairman, new CEO and new coach somehow gained stability - for eight years, anyway. But the Roos are back in a vulnerable place. A new coach, new CEO and new footy operations boss are about to team up with a chairman, who along with a former director, has ruthlessly applied a figurative flamethrower to operations – actions they deemed not just necessary but crucial to the future. Once again – yet again - it is make or break time for the Roos. And while it was Gold Coast last time, it is Tasmania this time, when it comes to the AFL's geographical foothold plans. DAMIAN BARRETT delves deep into the club's latest turmoil.

IT'S THE halfway point of the 2016 season.

North Melbourne, coming off preliminary final finishes in 2014 and 2015, has just defeated Richmond by 70 points in Hobart and is a game clear on top of the ladder with a 10-1 scoreline.

Eleven matches later, the Roos have won just twice more. Club icon Brent Harvey, along with the equally loved Drew Petrie, Michael Firrito and Nick Dal Santo have all had their careers ended in decisions which may have been right but embarrassingly poorly delivered to the individuals and public.

That year's flag is won by the Western Bulldogs. Richmond wins in 2017, a season in which North finishes 15th and re-contracts its coach Brad Scott all the way through to the end of 2020.

Less than half that deal later, early in the 2019 season, Scott is exited. At the same time, North Melbourne chairman Ben Buckley decides the chief executive officer and general manager of football, Carl Dilena and Cam Joyce, will also be departing.

Financial arrangements pertaining to Scott, Dilena and assistant coach Leigh Tudor, who has also parted, will tally about $1.5 million on the 2020 books.

That is serious impost for Ben Amarfio, even before he walks in to the club later this month as its new CEO.

North Melbourne is heading into the future with three new faces in its three key administrative positions - Amarfio, Rhyce Shaw as coach and Brady Rawlings as general manager of football.

The regularly struggling club - the one which took 50 years to win its first VFL premiership, which was forced into a private ownership structure in the 1980s as a last-resort survival project, which the AFL was desperate to move to the Gold Coast in the late 2000s – is again in a vulnerable state.

AFL headquarters has been an interested, and occasionally concerned, observer of the North Melbourne goings-on this year.

That the AFL needs to, after 2021 when deals to play games in Tasmania by North Melbourne (Hobart) and Hawthorn (Launceston) expire, finally and emphatically resolve its own business strategy in the Apple Isle is both a worrying and exciting backdrop for the Roos as they attempt to work their way out of their latest period of uncertainty.

There is clearly a deal to be made for North in Tasmania, a potentially lucrative one which could see the club maintain an 11 "home" game arrangement in Melbourne as well as servicing eight or nine matches in Hobart and Launceston.

Unless the club quickly regains authoritative control of its own operations, though, any deal will be made on its behalf.

The AFL has provided public encouragement to a consortium seeking a fresh licence for the state. But it is far from convinced that a new licence is the solution for the region.

Hawthorn is believed to be open to an exit provided it gets financial encouragement to do so, in order to partially fund its new facility at Dingley.

Which would leave North Melbourne as the focus of AFL plans outside Victoria. Again.

In late May after removing Scott, North Melbourne ordered a football department review, conducted by then-Roos board member Brian Walsh, ex-director Glenn Archer and former KPMG chairman Peter Nash.

Even as that review was unfolding, Archer, who had recently stepped off the North board, and Buckley instigated approaches and offers to ex-North players and recent premiership coaches in Adam Simpson, Alastair Clarkson and John Longmire.

The questions had to be asked. All said no, despite telephone number financial incentives. Just as big-name players like Dustin Martin, Josh Kelly, Jordan De Goey and others had done. Tom Lynch wouldn't even take a phone call.

The outcome of the initial review revealed a need to focus on culture and football, and an initial round of interviews for the CEO position saw ex-Fremantle CEO Steve Rosich emerge as a frontrunner.

But some powerbrokers demanded a re-think.

Former North player and director Mark Brayshaw, currently CEO of the AFL Coaches Association, was always in the picture too, his mix of knowing the club intricately and intimately, as well as ticking the boxes of culture and football, making him a strong candidate.

Subsequent analysis of its situation then swung focus back to commercial and corporate facets, where Amarfio, who was a very popular boss of Triple M for five years and also drove the extraordinary financial deals secured by Australian cricket when in senior management at Cricket Australia, presented as the person for the future.

Just as Shaw had done to Buckley and Archer when he started winning matches after taking over from Scott.

North believes the appointment of Shaw will be proven to be a masterstroke, and he has impressed every single person at the club, partially due to a highly unusual quality for a person holding a senior position in AFL clubland – that of being refreshingly prepared to openly concede deficiencies in his make-up.

He is said to be well aware of shortcomings, but fastidiously committed to rectifying all of them, and has already been lauded for an inclusive all-club approach.

In 2016, when James Brayshaw's nine seasons as chairman expired and Buckley took over, there was a clear change in outlook, an appetite to focus on the now and to not be burdened by potential future ramifications relating to those decisions.

A 12-win 2018 season not only exceeded expectations, but gave Buckley confidence his outlook was right. Another recruiting spree was ordered, which secured Jared Polec, Aaron Hall, Dom Tyson and Jasper Pittard.

Scott's view of list management didn't match Buckley's, and when he presented to the North Melbourne board in May this year, so strong was he that the Roos needed to think deeply into the future that some directors felt he was saying to them that he wanted out.

He didn't. He was simply seeking clarity and thorough consideration on the future direction of the football department. But the fact he was asking questions led some to believe he was not sufficiently demonstrating a desire to continue.

Scott knew early in 2019 that he wouldn't be serving the 2020 year of his deal, and had privately prepared with Dilena an amicable and well-planned separation, quite possibly with Shaw as the nominated successor.

But Buckley moved in the week leading into the round 10 match against Western Bulldogs, thus ending plans for an orderly exit.

At that stage, Roos directors felt Scott would be coaching another club in 2020. Some were convinced it would be St Kilda, but a couple felt it would be Carlton.

Instead, in 2020 Scott is likely to be immersed in a wide-ranging, strategically significant role with the AFL.

Of equal significance to the Tasmania project for Amarfio is a need to secure for the Roos a sizeable chunk of land and freehold opportunities within the massive redevelopment of the suburb of North Melbourne and its train stations.

The past six months have been tumultuous for North as Buckley and Archer set about blowing up a past they had both had a say in as directors of the club.

They were convinced massive change was required and as stakeholders had rights to enforce it.

The future is on their heads, more than it is the three newbies – Shaw, Amarfio and Rawlings.
Damo has a whole set of new toys being chucked it seems.

Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
 

Gorman2Geister

Daniltchenko, you beauty!
Aug 16, 2014
903
4,114
Lissenden-stein
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
Carlisle Utd, Heart of Midlothian
Smacks of being spoon fed by Scotts or Joyce's. The details about Brad's outlook to the Boards, the pay details and the deal with Funky Carl to be paid out in 2020 are a bit of a giveaway.

Strategically it's nuts from the AFL to try and shift us south. Why remove a team from the fastest growing city in the country to set it up in a place where people are much more likely to follow a brand new team than change allegiance to one that they have barracked against for years? Set up one in the NT too, have 20 teams and more matches and you can ask for more $$ for the broadcast rights.
 

tales129

Premiership Player
Jul 27, 2006
3,752
4,654
adelaide
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Damo and Caro as mouthpieces for the afl are rightly pissed off that we’ve gone and given the powers that be a big fu** you.

We are their ticket to tassie - and Buckley, arch have said piss off campaigners.

We were dying a slowly choking, desanitised brad Scott death, but we’ve clearly identified that - pissed off all the koolaid, and grabbed a refreshing forward thinking mongrel in Rhyce Shaw to take us into the future on field.

Add a ruthless list manager and shrewd footy ops boss in Rawlings and a clearly skull cracking, terse negotiating CEO, and we’ve 360’d the previous trajectory and the AFL aren’t happy.

Good, fu** the lot of them
 

Kangaroos4eva

Hall of Famer
Aug 22, 2012
38,580
68,675
NSW
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
West Ham United
The anti-North spin continues -
BARRETT: Can these new leaders stop a shaky North from heading south? -
The mid to late 2000s were tumultuous for North Melbourne. Financially haemorrhaging and fractured within its operations, the AFL was desperate to move it to the Gold Coast. A new chairman, new CEO and new coach somehow gained stability - for eight years, anyway. But the Roos are back in a vulnerable place. A new coach, new CEO and new footy operations boss are about to team up with a chairman, who along with a former director, has ruthlessly applied a figurative flamethrower to operations – actions they deemed not just necessary but crucial to the future. Once again – yet again - it is make or break time for the Roos. And while it was Gold Coast last time, it is Tasmania this time, when it comes to the AFL's geographical foothold plans. DAMIAN BARRETT delves deep into the club's latest turmoil.

IT'S THE halfway point of the 2016 season.

North Melbourne, coming off preliminary final finishes in 2014 and 2015, has just defeated Richmond by 70 points in Hobart and is a game clear on top of the ladder with a 10-1 scoreline.

Eleven matches later, the Roos have won just twice more. Club icon Brent Harvey, along with the equally loved Drew Petrie, Michael Firrito and Nick Dal Santo have all had their careers ended in decisions which may have been right but embarrassingly poorly delivered to the individuals and public.

That year's flag is won by the Western Bulldogs. Richmond wins in 2017, a season in which North finishes 15th and re-contracts its coach Brad Scott all the way through to the end of 2020.

Less than half that deal later, early in the 2019 season, Scott is exited. At the same time, North Melbourne chairman Ben Buckley decides the chief executive officer and general manager of football, Carl Dilena and Cam Joyce, will also be departing.

Financial arrangements pertaining to Scott, Dilena and assistant coach Leigh Tudor, who has also parted, will tally about $1.5 million on the 2020 books.

That is serious impost for Ben Amarfio, even before he walks in to the club later this month as its new CEO.

North Melbourne is heading into the future with three new faces in its three key administrative positions - Amarfio, Rhyce Shaw as coach and Brady Rawlings as general manager of football.

The regularly struggling club - the one which took 50 years to win its first VFL premiership, which was forced into a private ownership structure in the 1980s as a last-resort survival project, which the AFL was desperate to move to the Gold Coast in the late 2000s – is again in a vulnerable state.

AFL headquarters has been an interested, and occasionally concerned, observer of the North Melbourne goings-on this year.

That the AFL needs to, after 2021 when deals to play games in Tasmania by North Melbourne (Hobart) and Hawthorn (Launceston) expire, finally and emphatically resolve its own business strategy in the Apple Isle is both a worrying and exciting backdrop for the Roos as they attempt to work their way out of their latest period of uncertainty.

There is clearly a deal to be made for North in Tasmania, a potentially lucrative one which could see the club maintain an 11 "home" game arrangement in Melbourne as well as servicing eight or nine matches in Hobart and Launceston.

Unless the club quickly regains authoritative control of its own operations, though, any deal will be made on its behalf.

The AFL has provided public encouragement to a consortium seeking a fresh licence for the state. But it is far from convinced that a new licence is the solution for the region.

Hawthorn is believed to be open to an exit provided it gets financial encouragement to do so, in order to partially fund its new facility at Dingley.

Which would leave North Melbourne as the focus of AFL plans outside Victoria. Again.

In late May after removing Scott, North Melbourne ordered a football department review, conducted by then-Roos board member Brian Walsh, ex-director Glenn Archer and former KPMG chairman Peter Nash.

Even as that review was unfolding, Archer, who had recently stepped off the North board, and Buckley instigated approaches and offers to ex-North players and recent premiership coaches in Adam Simpson, Alastair Clarkson and John Longmire.

The questions had to be asked. All said no, despite telephone number financial incentives. Just as big-name players like Dustin Martin, Josh Kelly, Jordan De Goey and others had done. Tom Lynch wouldn't even take a phone call.

The outcome of the initial review revealed a need to focus on culture and football, and an initial round of interviews for the CEO position saw ex-Fremantle CEO Steve Rosich emerge as a frontrunner.

But some powerbrokers demanded a re-think.

Former North player and director Mark Brayshaw, currently CEO of the AFL Coaches Association, was always in the picture too, his mix of knowing the club intricately and intimately, as well as ticking the boxes of culture and football, making him a strong candidate.

Subsequent analysis of its situation then swung focus back to commercial and corporate facets, where Amarfio, who was a very popular boss of Triple M for five years and also drove the extraordinary financial deals secured by Australian cricket when in senior management at Cricket Australia, presented as the person for the future.

Just as Shaw had done to Buckley and Archer when he started winning matches after taking over from Scott.

North believes the appointment of Shaw will be proven to be a masterstroke, and he has impressed every single person at the club, partially due to a highly unusual quality for a person holding a senior position in AFL clubland – that of being refreshingly prepared to openly concede deficiencies in his make-up.

He is said to be well aware of shortcomings, but fastidiously committed to rectifying all of them, and has already been lauded for an inclusive all-club approach.

In 2016, when James Brayshaw's nine seasons as chairman expired and Buckley took over, there was a clear change in outlook, an appetite to focus on the now and to not be burdened by potential future ramifications relating to those decisions.

A 12-win 2018 season not only exceeded expectations, but gave Buckley confidence his outlook was right. Another recruiting spree was ordered, which secured Jared Polec, Aaron Hall, Dom Tyson and Jasper Pittard.

Scott's view of list management didn't match Buckley's, and when he presented to the North Melbourne board in May this year, so strong was he that the Roos needed to think deeply into the future that some directors felt he was saying to them that he wanted out.

He didn't. He was simply seeking clarity and thorough consideration on the future direction of the football department. But the fact he was asking questions led some to believe he was not sufficiently demonstrating a desire to continue.

Scott knew early in 2019 that he wouldn't be serving the 2020 year of his deal, and had privately prepared with Dilena an amicable and well-planned separation, quite possibly with Shaw as the nominated successor.

But Buckley moved in the week leading into the round 10 match against Western Bulldogs, thus ending plans for an orderly exit.

At that stage, Roos directors felt Scott would be coaching another club in 2020. Some were convinced it would be St Kilda, but a couple felt it would be Carlton.

Instead, in 2020 Scott is likely to be immersed in a wide-ranging, strategically significant role with the AFL.

Of equal significance to the Tasmania project for Amarfio is a need to secure for the Roos a sizeable chunk of land and freehold opportunities within the massive redevelopment of the suburb of North Melbourne and its train stations.

The past six months have been tumultuous for North as Buckley and Archer set about blowing up a past they had both had a say in as directors of the club.

They were convinced massive change was required and as stakeholders had rights to enforce it.

The future is on their heads, more than it is the three newbies – Shaw, Amarfio and Rawlings.
033AE27F-F517-4472-AD9F-AEE0B7B5C1FB.jpeg
 

Snake_Baker

L'enfant terrible
Apr 24, 2013
51,819
99,815
inside your head
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
The Unicornia Reactants
tumultuous
haemorrhaging
fractured
desperate
vulnerable
ruthlessly applied a figurative flamethrower
crucial to the future.
it is make or break time
embarrassingly poorly
serious impost
regularly struggling
again in a vulnerable state.
latest period of uncertainty.
tumultuous
blowing up


I sometimes wonder if Damian gets too emotionally over-invested in North.
 

Kangaroos4eva

Hall of Famer
Aug 22, 2012
38,580
68,675
NSW
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
West Ham United
tumultuous
haemorrhaging
fractured
desperate
vulnerable
ruthlessly applied a figurative flamethrower
crucial to the future.
it is make or break time
embarrassingly poorly
serious impost
regularly struggling
again in a vulnerable state.
latest period of uncertainty.
tumultuous
blowing up


I sometimes wonder if Damian gets too emotionally over-invested in North.
Like a jilted ex-partner that doesn't know how to move on.
 

Snake_Baker

L'enfant terrible
Apr 24, 2013
51,819
99,815
inside your head
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
The Unicornia Reactants
Like a jilted ex-partner that doesn't know how to move on.
He was a very good journo before he went all mainstream television, and then his ego got involved and he lost his mind.

There's still a couple of truths hidden in amongst the emotional hype.

Mid 2016 onwards has not been done well.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Top Bottom