Opinion Commentary & Media III

Snake_Baker

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Pfffft, as if!
Oh no...

WALLACE FLAGS CONCERN WITH NORTH MELBOURNE'S LIST
BY SEN AN HOUR AGO

Three-time Hawthorn premiership player Terry Wallace is concerned about the age profile of the spine of North Melbourne’s team.

Key forward Jarrad Waite announced his retirement at the end of 2018 while the likes of Scott Thompson, Robbie Tarrant, Todd Goldstein and Shaun Higgins are all either approaching or over the age of 30.

While Wallace expects the Kangaroos to be ultra-competitive in 2019, a genuine premiership tilt could be a while off due as they search for long-term replacements for their key veterans.

“My one question still with them is you’ve got a spine that has got Scott Thompson, Robbie Tarrant, Todd Goldstein, Shaun Higgins and they’ve just lost Jarrad Waite,” Wallace told SEN.

“A lot of your key core players are not going to be there in a couple of years.

“So to me if they don’t win it in the next two years - and I don’t see them winning it in the next two years - I think they’re going to be as far away as many clubs in the competition of actually winning it.

“They’re going to be better than a lot of sides in this competition this year.

“I think that they’re potentially a top eight team this year, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that they’re any closer to winning a flag.”

The Roos signed Aaron Hall, Jasper Pittard and Jared Polec during the trade period and added exciting youngster Tarryn Thomas via the AFL Draft.

North Melbourne “a much better side” than Terry Wallace expected

SEN - Tue, 29th May 2018 http://aflnation.com.au/2018/05/29/north-melbourne-a-much-better-side-than-terry-wallace-expected/#respond

Former Western Bulldogs and Richmond coach Terry Wallace stands by his pre-season assessment of North Melbourne’s list despite their terrific start to the season.

Wallace described North’s list as the worst in the competition after they won just six games last season.

The Kangaroos have already equalled that tally in 2018, and while the Hawthorn champion admits he got the ladder prediction wrong, their ageing spine would still be difficult to replace with what they’ve currently got on their list.

“I’m not stepping away from those comments at all,” Wallace told SEN Afternoons.

“When we did our list assessments of where they stood, I didn’t have North in the bottom four. I had them sitting 14th with four clubs underneath them.

“I thought they would be competitive this year but I still thought they had the worst list.

“When you’re analysing lists you’re trying to have a look at when you’re next opportunity is to win a flag.

“Now I thought at the stage when it finished last year I thought North were the furthest from contending for a flag.

“There were reasons why I thought that: In my belief I didn’t believe that Scott Thompson, Robbie Tarrant, Todd Goldstein, Shaun Higgins and Jarrad Waite would be there when they’re next contending for a flag.

“I would put an argument to you that there might be a chance that Jack Ziebell, Ben Cunnington and Ben Jacobs may very well not be there when they’re contending for their next flag.

“The caveat was unless they do something amazing within this 18 month period.

“I had a look at what else was on their list and how they would replace that mature spine and I thought they were a mile away from it.

“From what I’ve seen at VFL level and under 18 level, I did my assessment on those blokes not being available and what I saw from the edges not being strong enough to be able to get them there.

“That did not mean that they would not compete.

“I’m the first to put up my hand and say: ‘yep I got them wrong this year.’ They’re a much better side than what I thought they would be this year.

“Well done to them – it’s fantastic. But I still think they’re a long way away.”

North Melbourne take on Brisbane at Etihad Stadium on Sunday as they look to consolidate their spot in the top eight.
 

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Snake_Baker

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Pfffft, as if!
Would he say that we’re further away from a flag than Hawthorn?
I’ll ring him on SEN next time and ask him
He is simply clueless, never mentions any of our youngsters
An oxygen thief
Despite ranking our 2017 1st round selection as the best in his draft:

2017 DRAFT: Where could Plough’s Top 10 end up?

AFL Nation - Mon, 30th Oct 2017 - http://aflnation.com.au/2017/10/30/2017-draft-ploughs-top-10-end/#respond

Back in late September, Terry Wallace ran the rule over the 2017 NAB AFL National Draft.

on Future Stars, Plough picked out his Top 10 before the draft order was sorted prior to the trade period.

Taking a look back to a month in the past, we've lined up The List Manager’s prediction with that of the final order for the November 24 draft to see what could occur on the big day.

Terry Wallace’s draft Top 10 and where they could end up


1. BRISBANE: Luke Davies-Uniacke (midfielder – Dandenong Stingrays)

2. FREMANTLE: Paddy Dow (midfielder – Bendigo Pioneers)

3. CARLTON: Cameron Rayner (midfielder – Western Jets)

4. NORTH MELBOURNE: Adam Cerra (midfielder – Eastern Ranges)

5. FREMANTLE: Jaidyn Stephenson (midfielder – Eastern Ranges)

6. COLLINGWOOD: Jarrod Brander (forward/defender – Bendigo Pioneers)

7. ST KILDA: Darcy Fogarty (midfielder – Glenelg)

8. ST KILDA: Hunter Clark (defender/midfielder – Dandenong Stingrays)

9. WESTERN BULLDOGS: Nick Coffield (defender – Northern Knights)

10. CARLTON: Andrew Brayshaw (midfielder – Sandringham Dragons)
 
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I guarantee you that Terry Wallace is filthy that North Melbourne made him look stupid with his idiotic call that we had the worst list, bar none. I mean did he even have a look at other lists or did he just go straight to North Melbourne? This is why when you hear this tool try and defend his comments and then continues to stand by them, you just know he is fuming as tools like him cannot stand to be wrong.

And now he has focused on “So to me if they don’t win it in the next two years - and I don’t see them winning it in the next two years - I think they’re going to be as far away as many clubs in the competition of actually winning it. Such wise words from the campaigner. But hey, he must be right. You know, its not like we have improved our list by a country mile, have a bunch of talented kids that will be primed in two years time, if not earlier, and yeah there is this process called free agency and trade that as far as I know, we haven't been banned from. Those facts must have slipped his mind when predicting our position.

In saying all that, I actually love how the media just don't rate us. It only just makes it so much sweeter when you watch them trying to back peddle on their comment when they get our prediction so wrong. And as for Terry Wallace, if he was living in the 1700's, Dr Frankenstein wouldn't have been stupid enough use Terry's brain when he was creating his monster. Even Dr Frankenstein would've wanted his monster to have so chance in life.
 

susurrar

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wow gastelum is short. wide though. still think he needs to get back down to welterweight and could do it pretty easily. style bender isnt as tall as i would have thought either. a little strange seeing this knowing how small jed and marley are for afl players. pretty funny to think that marley and jed would be ufc middleweights or thereabouts.
 
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giantroo

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Which players and clubs will have the edge from footy’s new rules?

JON RALPH, Herald Sun
December 9, 2018 5:30pm
Subscriber only

Zach Tuohy stands in the MCG goal square with Sherrin in hand, scanning the horizon for targets further afield.

Then he darts away, rushing out of the goal square without touching the ball to his boot under the AFL’s new 2019 rule changes.

The Collingwood players aware of his thumping kick push their zone back another 15 metres, desperate to guard the space in the centre corridor and prevent an end-to-end goal.

Instead, as part of a set play, Tuohy handballs over man on the mark Jamie Elliott to Patrick Dangerfield, who has found a pocket of space 40m out from Collingwood’s goal.

He turns, sprints upfield, unleashes a 60m drop punt over the zone to Tom Hawkins, who is holding off Darcy Moore with his hands before marking 40m out.

Welcome to AFL administrator Steve Hocking’s utopia — the kind of innovation and set play strategy he hopes will be seen in a game like Round 1’s Collingwood-Geelong blockbuster next year.
Geelong defender Zach Tuohy will have plenty of options from the goal square. Picture: Michael Klein

After five years of the lowest scoring the game has seen since 1968, the AFL preferred a series of smaller changes rather than a radical shift like an 18m goalsquare or starting positions at stoppages.

But which players will it help, and which clubs will be smart enough to strategise over the summer to get small but important tactical advantages from the new rules?

KICK-IN STRATEGY

Hocking is excited at the prospect of players like GWS tyro Lachie Whitfield being given boundless possibilities at kick-ins.

Do they play on and take two bounces, do they take on the man on the mark, do they get a teammate to block the man on the mark and thump torpedoes to the centre square?

But what Champion Data’s kick-in rankings show is the old, wizened greybeards are the masters at one of the most difficult kicks in football.

The kick-in ratings take into account the execution and difficulty of kick, meaning the short chip to the teammate 15m away in the pocket doesn’t help your rating.

Surprisingly, North Melbourne’s 196cm full back Robbie Tarrant was this year’s best kick-in exponent (+14.1 per cent), with fellow Roos defender Scott Thompson (+7.3 per cent) the fourth-best in the league.

It is no surprise the booming Eagle Shannon Hurn (+8.2 per cent) was ranked second, followed by Jarrad McVeigh (+8.1 per cent), with retired Demons Bernie Vince fifth (+6.7 per cent).

None of those players use their pace to steal an extra 10m on the full back.

So will regular kick-in exponents like Jimmy Webster, Whitfield, Nathan Wilson and Jarrod Harbrow be tasked with initiating set plays using their pace?

At Brisbane Luke Hodge (42 kicks-outs last year), Alex Witherden and Daniel Rich shared kick-in duties last year.

Does the long-kicking Rich get the lion’s share of kick-ins this year or do they back in the trusty Hodge?

At the Western Bulldogs, does Luke Beveridge task Jason Johannisen (38 kickouts this season) with attempting to play on then beat the man on the mark, using his pace to launch the ball into offensive territory?

HANDS IN THE BACK

The AFL says allowing players to protect the drop zone by protecting space with hands will allow a purer marking contest.

Instead of a recipe for over-the-back marks, it could be a recipe for disaster.

Instead of these shades of grey we previously had a concrete rule that everyone understood, which also encouraged players to leap at the ball instead of wrestle.

Now we will get weekly controversies over this rule centering on the difference between legally holding your ground with hands and extending those hands to illegally push your opponent.


Geelong has to be the main beneficiary, with Tom Hawkins the second-best one-on-one player in the league after winning 21 of his 88 marking contests outright in 2018.

Patrick Dangerfield was ranked in the top 10 this year (17.2 per cent win-rate) and often uses brute strength to hold off opponents.

Taylor Walker, Jordan De Goey, Lance Franklin and Charlie Dixon are all in the top 10, but no one wins a higher percentage of deep marking contests than Dustin Martin.

Damien Hardwick’s coaching team will spend countless hours this summer scheming and plotting.

How do they integrate Tom Lynch into their forward set up while also finding ways to isolate one of Martin, Jack Riewoldt or Lynch deep at various times.

A defender now has the fearsome reality of knowing if they play in front Martin will hold them off with hands in a marking contes, and if they play from behind he will dart away for the 15m lead-and-mark.

RISE OF THE WINGMEN

The 6-6-6 rule means the “spitter” in football is officially dead, a seventh defender who charged off the back of the square as an extra midfielder at centre bounces.

But the new centre bounce rules mean a star wingman is worth his weight in gold because he has so much room to move and only a single opponent.

Melbourne played one or two “spitters” early in the 2018 season, so how do they maximise the new rules?
The Demons could employ Angus Brayshaw as a wingman more often in 2019. Picture: AAP

With a winning ruckman like Max Gawn, do they play Nathan Jones or Angus Brayshaw off a wing then ensure Gawn taps the ball in that direction as the Demons wingman charges into the contest?

Or does that wingman charge forward when Gawn, Jack Viney and Clayton Oliver are dominating in close, allowing the Demons another forward for a few seconds after a centre bounce?

Players restricted to the 50m arc at centre bounces will flock to the contest, so a team will only have a few seconds to attempt to maximise their advantage with a winning wingman.

But North Melbourne has a headstart, boasting the third-best wingman of the past two years (Jared Polec), the fourth-best (Aaron Hall), the fifth-best (Trent Dumont) and narrowly missing on the signature of Andrew Gaff (the ninth-best).
 

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Groin guru

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Would be good to hear from Bard Scotts soon, what week are into for preseason? Been a while since I've heard "bitterly disappointed"
Brad Scott isn't that predictable. I can't wait for the 7-minute presser. I get a pep in my step after watching Brad gush over North.
 

muttley45

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Which players and clubs will have the edge from footy’s new rules?

JON RALPH, Herald Sun
December 9, 2018 5:30pm
Subscriber only

Zach Tuohy stands in the MCG goal square with Sherrin in hand, scanning the horizon for targets further afield.

Then he darts away, rushing out of the goal square without touching the ball to his boot under the AFL’s new 2019 rule changes.

The Collingwood players aware of his thumping kick push their zone back another 15 metres, desperate to guard the space in the centre corridor and prevent an end-to-end goal.

Instead, as part of a set play, Tuohy handballs over man on the mark Jamie Elliott to Patrick Dangerfield, who has found a pocket of space 40m out from Collingwood’s goal.

He turns, sprints upfield, unleashes a 60m drop punt over the zone to Tom Hawkins, who is holding off Darcy Moore with his hands before marking 40m out.

Welcome to AFL administrator Steve Hocking’s utopia — the kind of innovation and set play strategy he hopes will be seen in a game like Round 1’s Collingwood-Geelong blockbuster next year.
Geelong defender Zach Tuohy will have plenty of options from the goal square. Picture: Michael Klein

After five years of the lowest scoring the game has seen since 1968, the AFL preferred a series of smaller changes rather than a radical shift like an 18m goalsquare or starting positions at stoppages.

But which players will it help, and which clubs will be smart enough to strategise over the summer to get small but important tactical advantages from the new rules?

KICK-IN STRATEGY

Hocking is excited at the prospect of players like GWS tyro Lachie Whitfield being given boundless possibilities at kick-ins.

Do they play on and take two bounces, do they take on the man on the mark, do they get a teammate to block the man on the mark and thump torpedoes to the centre square?

But what Champion Data’s kick-in rankings show is the old, wizened greybeards are the masters at one of the most difficult kicks in football.

The kick-in ratings take into account the execution and difficulty of kick, meaning the short chip to the teammate 15m away in the pocket doesn’t help your rating.

Surprisingly, North Melbourne’s 196cm full back Robbie Tarrant was this year’s best kick-in exponent (+14.1 per cent), with fellow Roos defender Scott Thompson (+7.3 per cent) the fourth-best in the league.

It is no surprise the booming Eagle Shannon Hurn (+8.2 per cent) was ranked second, followed by Jarrad McVeigh (+8.1 per cent), with retired Demons Bernie Vince fifth (+6.7 per cent).

None of those players use their pace to steal an extra 10m on the full back.

So will regular kick-in exponents like Jimmy Webster, Whitfield, Nathan Wilson and Jarrod Harbrow be tasked with initiating set plays using their pace?

At Brisbane Luke Hodge (42 kicks-outs last year), Alex Witherden and Daniel Rich shared kick-in duties last year.

Does the long-kicking Rich get the lion’s share of kick-ins this year or do they back in the trusty Hodge?

At the Western Bulldogs, does Luke Beveridge task Jason Johannisen (38 kickouts this season) with attempting to play on then beat the man on the mark, using his pace to launch the ball into offensive territory?

HANDS IN THE BACK

The AFL says allowing players to protect the drop zone by protecting space with hands will allow a purer marking contest.

Instead of a recipe for over-the-back marks, it could be a recipe for disaster.

Instead of these shades of grey we previously had a concrete rule that everyone understood, which also encouraged players to leap at the ball instead of wrestle.

Now we will get weekly controversies over this rule centering on the difference between legally holding your ground with hands and extending those hands to illegally push your opponent.


Geelong has to be the main beneficiary, with Tom Hawkins the second-best one-on-one player in the league after winning 21 of his 88 marking contests outright in 2018.

Patrick Dangerfield was ranked in the top 10 this year (17.2 per cent win-rate) and often uses brute strength to hold off opponents.

Taylor Walker, Jordan De Goey, Lance Franklin and Charlie Dixon are all in the top 10, but no one wins a higher percentage of deep marking contests than Dustin Martin.

Damien Hardwick’s coaching team will spend countless hours this summer scheming and plotting.

How do they integrate Tom Lynch into their forward set up while also finding ways to isolate one of Martin, Jack Riewoldt or Lynch deep at various times.

A defender now has the fearsome reality of knowing if they play in front Martin will hold them off with hands in a marking contes, and if they play from behind he will dart away for the 15m lead-and-mark.

RISE OF THE WINGMEN

The 6-6-6 rule means the “spitter” in football is officially dead, a seventh defender who charged off the back of the square as an extra midfielder at centre bounces.

But the new centre bounce rules mean a star wingman is worth his weight in gold because he has so much room to move and only a single opponent.

Melbourne played one or two “spitters” early in the 2018 season, so how do they maximise the new rules?
The Demons could employ Angus Brayshaw as a wingman more often in 2019. Picture: AAP

With a winning ruckman like Max Gawn, do they play Nathan Jones or Angus Brayshaw off a wing then ensure Gawn taps the ball in that direction as the Demons wingman charges into the contest?

Or does that wingman charge forward when Gawn, Jack Viney and Clayton Oliver are dominating in close, allowing the Demons another forward for a few seconds after a centre bounce?

Players restricted to the 50m arc at centre bounces will flock to the contest, so a team will only have a few seconds to attempt to maximise their advantage with a winning wingman.

But North Melbourne has a headstart, boasting the third-best wingman of the past two years (Jared Polec), the fourth-best (Aaron Hall), the fifth-best (Trent Dumont) and narrowly missing on the signature of Andrew Gaff (the ninth-best).
I just read that article by Ralph in today's Hun, and lo and behold, they have used the same picture of Ryan Clarke and called him Trent Dumont again :p
 

ferball

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RISE OF THE WINGMEN

The 6-6-6 rule means the “spitter” in football is officially dead, a seventh defender who charged off the back of the square as an extra midfielder at centre bounces.

But the new centre bounce rules mean a star wingman is worth his weight in gold because he has so much room to move and only a single opponent.

Melbourne played one or two “spitters” early in the 2018 season, so how do they maximise the new rules?
The Demons could employ Angus Brayshaw as a wingman more often in 2019. Picture: AAP

With a winning ruckman like Max Gawn, do they play Nathan Jones or Angus Brayshaw off a wing then ensure Gawn taps the ball in that direction as the Demons wingman charges into the contest?

Or does that wingman charge forward when Gawn, Jack Viney and Clayton Oliver are dominating in close, allowing the Demons another forward for a few seconds after a centre bounce?

Players restricted to the 50m arc at centre bounces will flock to the contest, so a team will only have a few seconds to attempt to maximise their advantage with a winning wingman.

But North Melbourne has a headstart, boasting the third-best wingman of the past two years (Jared Polec), the fourth-best (Aaron Hall), the fifth-best (Trent Dumont) and narrowly missing on the signature of Andrew Gaff (the ninth-best).
It may not be totally dead. The 6th defender will charge in at times. I'd expect good inside teams like Melbourne (and us) would try to use this to their advantage. It doesn't help the opposition if twice a quarter you rotate a mid into CHB/BF and really focus on winning that clearance in the middle. Its an all or nothing play but there are times it could work really well.
 
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