Opinion Commentary & Media IV

king of the road

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Currently on 1.5 million hits, and counting.
Could this be our new media savvy CEO using innovative ways to engage new audiences?

Makes sense. Traditional media in Australia is expensive and is consumed by older Australians who are dedicated supporters of an existing team. They’re not going to readily change teams and support Nth.

In a global market, tap into a younger and more impressionable market, yet to commit.

Iso around the world. Captive new, young audience. Australia = Kangaroos.
 

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SMaturin

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Could this be our new media savvy CEO using innovative ways to engage new audiences?

Makes sense. Traditional media in Australia is expensive and is consumed by older Australians who are dedicated supporters of an existing team. They’re not going to readily change teams and support Nth.

In a global market, tap into a younger and more impressionable market, yet to commit.

Iso around the world. Captive new, young audience. Australia = Kangaroos.
If so = big tick. It can’t be a coincidence that he’s in a north top, surely.
 
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king of the road

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If so then big tick. It can’t be a coincidence that he’s in a north top, surely.
I think that's what they're trying to do with the 'hipster' articles with Jasper and other new approaches of late. Even in galvanizing the old guard and standing up for ourselves too. Also, the smart, informal approach of Larks and the Bull. There's been a change since he came on board.

Particularly when you look at Jasper and other such articles. A lot of the younger generation, def not all, but some - are more socially conscious, sick of macho blokey bollocks and the stupid old white men of the older generation who have completely f'd the planet diminishing the likelihood of them having the prosperous life of those before them. #boomer remover. For those who are into old blokey bollocks - you can still get your fix around the traps too though.

But many more are now are tuned into social media and want a club that has social values at its core. Not everyone wants that - but there's a market there. And North can be a point of difference here. No gambling, the huddle, progressive with the AFLW etc. As far as the club is concerned, it's seems a real no 'dk heads' work place and the coaches love the vibe...

We've always been innovative. With broader disruption occurring in multiple sectors at the moment, there's a real opportunity to be ahead of the curve, and engage with new audiences locally and internationally to enhance the standing of the club and drive revenue.
 

krakouers85

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The Tackle: Wayne Carey heads list to be 29th legend in the Australian Football Hall of Fame
Mark Robinson
Herald Sun
Sunday, 17 May 2020

Wayne Carey is one of the likely contenders to be the next AFL legend.
Wayne Carey is one of the likely contenders to be the next AFL legend. Credit: News Corp Australia, Karen Dodd

The 29th AFL Legend will be inducted this year and the panel is spoilt for choice. But one modern great — Wayne Carey — is the standout candidate. Here’s why.
Or will it be Jason Dunstall or Gary Ablett Snr, two champion forwards who reigned supreme in the 1980s before Carey joined them in the 1990s to produce arguably the greatest assembled batch of key forwards the game has seen?
What about Greg Williams, or Stephen Silvagni?

Or the one-time games record-holder Michael Tuck, who just happened to win seven flags and lose four other Grand Finals.
This is a year for a Legend to be inducted into the Australian Football Hall of Fame — the 29th official Legend.

The most recent was Kevin Sheedy (2018), and before him it was Malcolm Blight (2017) and Tony Lockett (2015).
Other Legends include Leigh Matthews (1996), Ted Whitten (1996), Peter Hudson (1999), Kevin Bartlett (2000) and Alex Jesaulenko (2008).
The names ooze achievement and legacy.
Among them is the greatest player who has played the game. It’s a matter of opinion, of course, but plenty have Matthews as No.1.
Wise people reckon Carey is on the podium with Matthews, and his Legend status is coming soon, if not this time around.
Others argue Ablett Sr was the purest, most explosive and most talented player ever to lace up the boots.
But what about Dunstall as a candidate? “Chief” kicked 1254 goals and is third on the all-time list behind Lockett (1360) and Gordon Coventry (1299), both official Legends.
That doesn’t mean the Hawks champ is automatically the next to be elevated to the exalted status.

It doesn’t work like that; Legend elevation is not ticked off in chronological order.
Because Dunstall finished his career before Carey did, that doesn’t give Dunstall the leg-up.
It’s a terribly difficult task this year, as it is every year, because a handful of players deserve the honour.
My choice would be Carey, who was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.
The selectors could opt for Williams and that wouldn’t be wrong. Neither would Dunstall.
Ablett Sr would still be controversial. Not because of his remarkable ability to play the game — I ranked him the No.1 player ahead of Carey as the best player of the national era — but because of an event after his career ended.
It might not be a popular opinion, or it might be, but I’m not sure the AFL is ready to bestow its ultimate honour on a man who spent a night with a 20-year-old woman who didn’t see the next morning.
I still think of her and her parents about this time every year when the Hall of Fame is discussed.
The AFL might decide sufficient time has passed — it was 20 years ago in February — but, really, who can judge the “right time”?

Carey, too, has had his post-career challenges, but
he has also made a strong contribution to football after getting his life back on track.
There is no need to
list Carey’s on-field accomplishments.
Simply, he was a colossal player; brave, inspiring, compelling to watch and he arguably had more impact on games than any other player in the past 40 years.
Matthews once said of Carey: “I thought ‘Blighty’
was (the best) when I finished playing … (but) what Carey did in the ’90s decade was remarkable.’’
He would be a deserved Legend.
And so would Dunstall and Diesel, or I’m sure whomever else the selectors elevated, be it player or coach.
Maybe the selectors have turned the page into this century and assessed the likes of Michael Voss or Chris Judd, who finished their careers in the 2000s.
Maybe, but ahead of Carey et al? Don’t think so.
Of course, it will be a different ceremony this year.
The Legend and the inductees have already been selected — their names are known to very, very few — and the AFL and Fox Footy are starting to plan their coverage.
Brisbane Lion Simon Black will be presented with his award. He was inducted last year, but was unable to attend the AFL’s lavish event because he was filming Survivor. The poor bugger misses out on another gala event this year because of the isolation rules.
Six others will join him.

That’s where the selection committee had an unenviable task.
Eligible for the Hall of Fame this year are players who retired after the 2014 season.
They include Brisbane goliath Jonathan Brown, West Coast Eagles champs Dean Cox and Darren Glass, and St Kilda’s spiritual leader Lenny Hayes.
There’s a bunch of other standouts ready to join the game’s elite.
The list is headed by Collingwood’s Thorold Merrett, North Melbourne’s John Dugdale and Melbourne’s Don Williams, a player Ron Barassi described as the best he played with at the Demons.
There’s Richmond’s dynamic centreman Geoff Raines, Hawthorn’s Chris Mew and Gary Buckenara, Carlton’s Rod Ashman,
St Kilda’s Nicky Winmar, Essendon and Brisbane Lions forward Roger Merrett, Melbourne’s Brent Crosswell and Footscray’s Kelvin Templeton from the 1970s and 1980s who have to be considered. And more recently Eagles rover Daniel Kerr and Lions star Luke Power.
State league footballers from South Australia and Western Australia usually feature prominently, too.
Selectors also can select an administrator, umpire and media person whose contribution to Australian rules cannot be ignored.
NOTE: The selection committee comprises Richard Goyder, Paul Marsh, Michelangelo Rucci, Karen Lyon, Bruce McAvaney, Tania Armstrong and David Parkin.
 

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The Tackle: Wayne Carey heads list to be 29th legend in the Australian Football Hall of Fame
Mark Robinson
Herald Sun
Sunday, 17 May 2020

Wayne Carey is one of the likely contenders to be the next AFL legend.
Wayne Carey is one of the likely contenders to be the next AFL legend. Credit: News Corp Australia, Karen Dodd

The 29th AFL Legend will be inducted this year and the panel is spoilt for choice. But one modern great — Wayne Carey — is the standout candidate. Here’s why.
Or will it be Jason Dunstall or Gary Ablett Snr, two champion forwards who reigned supreme in the 1980s before Carey joined them in the 1990s to produce arguably the greatest assembled batch of key forwards the game has seen?
What about Greg Williams, or Stephen Silvagni?

Or the one-time games record-holder Michael Tuck, who just happened to win seven flags and lose four other Grand Finals.
This is a year for a Legend to be inducted into the Australian Football Hall of Fame — the 29th official Legend.

The most recent was Kevin Sheedy (2018), and before him it was Malcolm Blight (2017) and Tony Lockett (2015).
Other Legends include Leigh Matthews (1996), Ted Whitten (1996), Peter Hudson (1999), Kevin Bartlett (2000) and Alex Jesaulenko (2008).
The names ooze achievement and legacy.
Among them is the greatest player who has played the game. It’s a matter of opinion, of course, but plenty have Matthews as No.1.
Wise people reckon Carey is on the podium with Matthews, and his Legend status is coming soon, if not this time around.
Others argue Ablett Sr was the purest, most explosive and most talented player ever to lace up the boots.
But what about Dunstall as a candidate? “Chief” kicked 1254 goals and is third on the all-time list behind Lockett (1360) and Gordon Coventry (1299), both official Legends.
That doesn’t mean the Hawks champ is automatically the next to be elevated to the exalted status.

It doesn’t work like that; Legend elevation is not ticked off in chronological order.
Because Dunstall finished his career before Carey did, that doesn’t give Dunstall the leg-up.
It’s a terribly difficult task this year, as it is every year, because a handful of players deserve the honour.
My choice would be Carey, who was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.
The selectors could opt for Williams and that wouldn’t be wrong. Neither would Dunstall.
Ablett Sr would still be controversial. Not because of his remarkable ability to play the game — I ranked him the No.1 player ahead of Carey as the best player of the national era — but because of an event after his career ended.
It might not be a popular opinion, or it might be, but I’m not sure the AFL is ready to bestow its ultimate honour on a man who spent a night with a 20-year-old woman who didn’t see the next morning.
I still think of her and her parents about this time every year when the Hall of Fame is discussed.
The AFL might decide sufficient time has passed — it was 20 years ago in February — but, really, who can judge the “right time”?

Carey, too, has had his post-career challenges, but
he has also made a strong contribution to football after getting his life back on track.
There is no need to
list Carey’s on-field accomplishments.
Simply, he was a colossal player; brave, inspiring, compelling to watch and he arguably had more impact on games than any other player in the past 40 years.
Matthews once said of Carey: “I thought ‘Blighty’
was (the best) when I finished playing … (but) what Carey did in the ’90s decade was remarkable.’’
He would be a deserved Legend.
And so would Dunstall and Diesel, or I’m sure whomever else the selectors elevated, be it player or coach.
Maybe the selectors have turned the page into this century and assessed the likes of Michael Voss or Chris Judd, who finished their careers in the 2000s.
Maybe, but ahead of Carey et al? Don’t think so.
Of course, it will be a different ceremony this year.
The Legend and the inductees have already been selected — their names are known to very, very few — and the AFL and Fox Footy are starting to plan their coverage.
Brisbane Lion Simon Black will be presented with his award. He was inducted last year, but was unable to attend the AFL’s lavish event because he was filming Survivor. The poor bugger misses out on another gala event this year because of the isolation rules.
Six others will join him.

That’s where the selection committee had an unenviable task.
Eligible for the Hall of Fame this year are players who retired after the 2014 season.
They include Brisbane goliath Jonathan Brown, West Coast Eagles champs Dean Cox and Darren Glass, and St Kilda’s spiritual leader Lenny Hayes.
There’s a bunch of other standouts ready to join the game’s elite.
The list is headed by Collingwood’s Thorold Merrett, North Melbourne’s John Dugdale and Melbourne’s Don Williams, a player Ron Barassi described as the best he played with at the Demons.
There’s Richmond’s dynamic centreman Geoff Raines, Hawthorn’s Chris Mew and Gary Buckenara, Carlton’s Rod Ashman,
St Kilda’s Nicky Winmar, Essendon and Brisbane Lions forward Roger Merrett, Melbourne’s Brent Crosswell and Footscray’s Kelvin Templeton from the 1970s and 1980s who have to be considered. And more recently Eagles rover Daniel Kerr and Lions star Luke Power.
State league footballers from South Australia and Western Australia usually feature prominently, too.
Selectors also can select an administrator, umpire and media person whose contribution to Australian rules cannot be ignored.
NOTE: The selection committee comprises Richard Goyder, Paul Marsh, Michelangelo Rucci, Karen Lyon, Bruce McAvaney, Tania Armstrong and David Parkin.
The comments under this article suggest it’s a “no” from the corner of public opinion
 

Kanga Glory

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This clipping is from the May 18 issue of The Herald Sun Digital Edition. To subscribe, visit https://www.heraldsun.com.au/.


Kangas hop to it
Herald Sun - Monday, 18 May 2020 - Page 50



Shaw: We’ve done the hard yards NORTH Melbourne has vowed to be ready when the AFL season resumes next month, with the club confident players have done the work to minimise the risk of injury.

Coach Rhyce Shaw said yesterday while injuries were always some concern after players returned from a break, his side had not been slacking off on their individual programs since the season was postponed in March.

Players will return to clubs to resume non-contact training in small groups today for at least a 3½-week pre-season .

While a fixture is yet to be released, the season will resume on Thursday, June 11.

“Our players and our team have been exceptional. I’ve been really proud of what they’ve been able to do,” Shaw told the Herald Sun.

“We’ve provided them with a really good framework and the boys have really taken control of that.

“We’d love to have more time. I’m not going to flirt with that. But in saying that, we understand we’ve got to get the game going, not only for the good of the game but for fans and members.

“I honestly believe we’ve done a fair bit of work to get ourselves to a point where we feel we’re ready.

“Being away from the club and not having the absolute ideal preparation heading into this period, there’s always going to be a risk (of injury).

“But I’m pretty confident that we can make some smart decisions and get our guys ready for whenever that first game is.”

Shaw said his message to his players on how to approach this season had been that they needed to be ready to hit the ground running in a shortened season where a premiership remained there for the taking.

“We’re not adapting to cope in this situation, we’re adapting to win,” Shaw said.

“We had a really good start to the season, even though that start to the season was a very long time ago. But we’ve got four points on the board, and we want to make the most of that in whatever form the competition heads into.

“At the end of the day there’s a premiership there to be won, and I want to win.

“That’s my No.1 priority in terms of our team and our club.”

North Melbourne scored a two-point win against St Kilda in Round 1 in March.

chris.cavanagh@news.com.au


Copyright © 2020 News Pty Limited





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King Corey

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Lewis never got over squibbing a contest with Daniel Pratt and then getting reported & giving away a free kick when Pratt reminded him about it.

It happened right in front of me and he put in more short steps than Fred Astaire

Believe it or not I saw "tough guy" Barry Hall pull out of a contest with Firrito too.

Commentators must've been reaching for their coffees at that exact moment.
 

King Corey

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Currently on 1.5 million hits, and counting.
So after years and years of AFL, AFL media and AFL sponsors barely including us in their visuals (except when we're being used as a stepladder or turnstile) it took a British bloke who plays computer games to feature us front and centre.

It's a crazy new world.
 

King Corey

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He's basically one of us, a North zealot, but with ability & courage.
Was playing equally best footy of any of the 2016 departees yet was the only one who immediately put his hand up and said "thanks for the memories" as soon as he got the tap.
 

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