Contact sports like AFL could cease to exist in one generation

Professor Knowall

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There was a huge head clash towards end of magpies & gws last week - interesting no injury reported.
Well all I can suggest is that if you are so concerned, you better find a non-physical game to follow like croquet, though I guess there's the risk of getting hit by a stray mis-hit ball or flying mallet.

Maybe I can recommend following chess championships - that could be safe enough for your approval.
 
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I mean we dont have gladiator fights anymore because we've evolved as a society and dont beget that type of public violence anymore.

So who knows?
MMA seems to be quite popular.

The AFL is either confused or virtue signalling about head contact. Any tackle where the arm strays over the shoulder is prohibited, even though it might not be dangerous. Yet in a marking contest you are allowed to take a run up and drive your knee into a guy's head.
 

iBeng

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MMA seems to be quite popular.

The AFL is either confused or virtue signalling about head contact. Any tackle where the arm strays over the shoulder is prohibited, even though it might not be dangerous. Yet in a marking contest you are allowed to take a run up and drive your knee into a guy's head.
That phrase is becoming a plague.

It all boils down to whether or not the next generation will PAY to watch AFL. As long as its got money sustaining it they wont care too much about their players being potentially effected for life by the chance of head injuries.
 

Professor Knowall

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BringBackTorps

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1. BBC 13.12.17


It is highly probable that there is a link between regular heading of soccer balls (the vast majority which occur in training) & long term dementia-type brain diseases.

Since 2015, after extensive US medical research/ advice from many US medical experts, US soccer authorities have banned heading (games & training) for all jnrs, to U 11- & restricted it up to U13. The vast majority of heading occurs in training.
The British PFA, since 2017, have a policy for similar bans for juniors heading soccer balls.


Why has the FFA, UEFA, FIFA etc. not banned headers for juniors?


This USA ban & PFA header-ban policy, however, have received virtually no ongoing reporting in the MSM in Australia (& probably many other countries). Why not?

Also, why hasn't there been similar public agitation in Aust. to ban/restrict heading for players up to U13?

2. Females have weaker neck muscles, generally smaller craniums & brains (&, AFAIK, thinner skulls).
Would females' risk of developing dementia etc. type injuries be higher than males who play soccer?

3. The report in post #54 covered the period of British professional soccer players who played between 1900-1976. Modern soccer balls are no longer leather and are, therefore, lighter.

Force = Mass X Acceleration
Professional soccer players are currently, on average, much fitter, stronger & heavier (& more skilful, so more likely to be able to do headers).
Even though the balls are lighter, they would, on average, be kicking the balls harder, cf previous eras.
This suggests the force/impact of the headed ball on the skull might be more close to that caused by the old leather balls, more than otherwise anticipated.

Modern, light weight soccer balls' "...heading can generate impact forces equivalent to those of a helmet to helmet football (adult Gridiron- my words) tackle".

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/19/well/heading-soccer-ball-children-kids-concussion-brain.html

Soccer heading should be banned for adults also?


4. At least 4 England 1966 WC squad players "...are all suffering memory loss or dementia...I've been informed that in the squad, it's quite a few more...Thats way above the statistical average in the wider community".
"If you had 2 squads of 22, in other words 44 players, you might get one person with dementia...that should be the average and the odds of such high rates of dementia happening are astronomical (my emphasis)".

"Brain Specialists like D Micheal Grey...have taken an interest with the unusually high number (my emphases) former footballers who have been diagnosed with Alzheimers".

 
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Rabman

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Pretty sure Alan Shearer did a documentary on the links between heading in soccer and dementia.
 

Professor Knowall

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And now, concussion rates in female soccer players are causing particular concern, being much higher than men.
BTW - As the attached article is American, the word 'football' refers to American football (with soccer called soccer).
 

BringBackTorps

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I am surprised that heading of soccer balls is still permitted in soccer.
Modern, light weight soccer ball heading is still very risky for long term brain health- most heading, at least for professionals, is done in training. See my post #56, with the New York Times link.



This 07/19 link below outlines the legal issues Australian courts would need to consider, in order to find a sporting organisation culpable for brain injuries allegedly caused by playing their sports.
 

Arwib

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At the very least they should be looking at restricting heading to the penalty area, that might eliminate some of the hardest head impacts.
 

Gigantor

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If there was no heading possible (which I don't foresee happening any time soon), there would be consequences, for example, the long bomb upfield by the keeper, and all of a sudden 4 to 6 players have to get to the ball with their feet, knees, chests, etc. before the ball hits the deck.
 

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BringBackTorps

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At the very least they should be looking at restricting heading to the penalty area, that might eliminate some of the hardest head impacts.[Not effective]
Probably 99% of heading occurs in practice- so heading must be totally banned during matches, otherwise players would still continue to practise.
 

BringBackTorps

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The Scottish Youth Soccer Association is recommending banning heading in training for kids up to U11; & limiting headers for players up to u 11 in games. This is due to professional soccer players having 3 & 1/2 times higher death rates from dementia; & also higher than average rates of having dementia.

 
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