News Coronavirus Thread

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glenn2479

All Australian
Jun 9, 2008
841
1,675
melbourne
AFL Club
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I know people have shit on how dumb millennials are, but holy shit... Tik Tok Gen Z has said hold my energy drink.




"Pfister, of Warrenton, has been charged by Warren County prosecutors with making a terrorist threat in the second degree. He was arrested Monday at a residence in Warrenton after the March 11 incident at the Walmart, Lt. Justin Unger told The Post."

lol that is a 5 year jail term on that charge... What are you in for? Liking deodorant at the supermarket. You would just ask for isolation off the bat, you are going to get your head punched in every day.
“What are you in for”?
“I ate a Pangolin”
“What are you in for”?
“I licked deodorant cans”
“Dude that’s messed up”!!
 

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rickety

Norm Smith Medallist
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An hour ago saw an ambo with the driver and the treating officer all decked out in PPE. A reasonably slow moving ambulance, no flashing lights, just the internal ones where somebody was obviously being treated. Entirely plausible PPE worn as a general precaution, only ever seen it on the tele though, sheltered life or not. Made it a little bit more real. Could have been anything, dunno.
 

Snake_Baker

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An hour ago saw an ambo with the driver and the treating officer all decked out in PPE. A reasonably slow moving ambulance, no flashing lights, just the internal ones where somebody was obviously being treated. Entirely plausible PPE worn as a general precaution, only ever seen it on the tele though, sheltered life or not. Made it a little bit more real. Could have been anything, dunno.
It would be due to the paramedics necessity to cross the SD barrier.
 

Tas

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Dec 23, 2002
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You serious?

Sweden has become an international outlier in its response to the deadly coronavirus outbreak by keeping schools open and adopting few other restrictions, as the Scandinavian nation embarks on what one health expert called a “huge experiment”.
 

ferball

Premium Platinum
Jul 24, 2015
16,948
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Mate, I appreciate any and all viral related content but this:



........is most certainly incorrect.

This is also incorrect:



It's between 60-140nm and can get through N95 face masks.

Furthermore:



The sterilization UV treatment is at a wavelength of 200-280nm, which does not get through the atmosphere to any great extent, thankfully, as we would all perish from cancers very quickly. However, I would conclude that direct solar exposure for a significant amount of time would eventually denature the viral proteins.

I would also consider this to be very doubtful:



Notify your old man/missus/whoever and tell them to ignore this.
Yeah there is heaps of bullshit in there. Nearly or all of it.

If I'd read it slowly I probably wouldn't have posted it at all.

Oh well. I had a funeral this morning... Online... I think it might have affected my critical thinking faculties.

But people should drink tea, and do breathing exercises, even if they don't stop the virus. :cool: :cool:
 

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koshari

Brownlow Medallist
Mar 24, 2011
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Sweden bucks global trend with experimental virus strategy
Richard Milne
Mar 26, 2020 – 7.46am



Oslo | Sweden has become an international outlier in its response to the deadly coronavirus outbreak by keeping schools open and adopting few other restrictions, as the Scandinavian nation embarks on what one health expert called a “huge experiment”.
Since the UK went into lockdown on Monday evening (Tuesday AEDT), Sweden is the largest European country with the fewest limits on where people can go and what they can do.

People were out and about among the blooming cherry trees in Stockholm this week. AP
Schools for children up to the age of 16 remain open, many people continue to go to work and packed commuter trains and buses were reported this week in the capital, Stockholm. “Clearly, Sweden stands out at the moment,” said Carl Bildt, the former prime minister.
Swedish authorities have banned public gatherings of more than 500 people, closed universities and higher education colleges, and advised workers to stay at home if possible. Authorities on Tuesday ordered restaurants and bars only to serve people at tables rather than at the bar.
Local media have been full of stories of thousands of people gathering at Swedish ski resorts, which until Saturday kept their nightlife open. The virus has previously spread easily in mountain resorts in Austria and Italy.
Johan Carlson, head of Sweden’s public health agency, last week defended Sweden’s approach, saying the country “cannot take draconian measures that have a limited impact on the epidemic but knock out the functions of society”.
There is a big risk that Sweden would have to go into quarantine when the health system goes into crisis.
— Joacim Rocklov, epidemiologist at Umea University
But he conceded that the 90,000 figure for the number of people who die annually in Sweden would “increase significantly” if its healthcare system became overburdened.
There have been just over 2000 reported COVID-19 cases in Sweden and 33 deaths. That compares with more than 6000 deaths in Italy, Europe’s worst-affected country.
“The future still looks manageable,” said Anders Tegnell, Sweden’s state epidemiologist who has become one of the public faces of the outbreak. He argued that schools needed to stay open to provide childcare for health workers, noting that young people appeared to have much lower infection rates.
But a significant number of Swedish health experts disagree. Mr Tegnell has faced a barrage of criticism after details of the country’s antivirus tactics leaked to Swedish TV at the weekend.
Joacim Rocklov, an epidemiologist at Umea University, said the Swedish authorities were taking huge risks with public health when so much remained unknown about coronavirus.
“I do not see why Sweden would be so different from other countries. It is a huge experiment,” he told the Financial Times. “We have no idea — it could work out. But it could also go crazily in the wrong direction.”
Swedish authorities have said they are not explicitly pursuing a strategy of “herd immunity”, where a large segment of the population contracts the virus in order for society to build up immunity. The UK’s chief scientific adviser had previously suggested that Britain adopt such an approach before the government backtracked.
The lockdowns are stripping the services sector to the bone.
Related
Recessionary wave breaks over bunkered Europe
Sweden is instead seeking to slow the spread of infections and ensure that its health system does not become overwhelmed. Mr Bildt said the situation on the streets of Stockholm had changed “dramatically” in recent weeks despite the absence of legal restrictions, with far fewer people going outside.
But Mr Rocklov said it was not yet known how long immunity to COVID-19 would last. “There is a big risk that Sweden would have to go into quarantine when the health system goes into crisis,” he added.
Sweden’s relaxed approach contrasts with its Nordic neighbours. Denmark, Norway and Finland have closed schools, sealed their borders and imposed other restrictions.
Stefan Lofven, Sweden’s centre-left prime minister, has called on everyone to play a part in stopping the virus from spreading by, for instance, not visiting elderly relatives and working from home. He used a televised address to the nation on Sunday to warn that more restrictive measures might come as he conceded the next few months would be difficult.
“There are a few crucial moments in life when you have to make sacrifices, not only for your own sake but also in order to take responsibility for the people around you, for your fellow human beings, and for our country. That moment is now. That day is here. And that duty belongs to everyone,” he said.
Sweden’s strategy has also been criticised for a different reason, with some arguing that even the lighter measures could cause huge damage to the economy. Kerstin Hessius, a prominent fund manager, is one of those arguing that the country may be swapping one disaster for an even worse one.
Her views provoked a riposte from Leif Ostling, former chief executive of truckmaker Scania, who accused her of living in a “financial bubble”. He urged Swedes not to become cynical and to hold to their “humanist viewpoint”.
Mr Rocklov said it was a “valid discussion” to have over whether the measures aimed at saving lives may do even more damage. But he also said Swedish authorities were not giving enough information for people to make up their own mind.
“More and more experts are feeling uneasy with this stewardship. It is not allowing for an open debate. It is rather trying to push down and make people quiet,” he said.
Financial Times
How the coronavirus is changing markets, business and politics.
Coronavirus: Need to know. Our daily reporting, in your inbox.
Sign up now
 

rickety

Norm Smith Medallist
Nov 3, 2007
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swfc, carrum cowboys
Sweden bucks global trend with experimental virus strategy
Richard Milne
Mar 26, 2020 – 7.46am



Oslo | Sweden has become an international outlier in its response to the deadly coronavirus outbreak by keeping schools open and adopting few other restrictions, as the Scandinavian nation embarks on what one health expert called a “huge experiment”.
Since the UK went into lockdown on Monday evening (Tuesday AEDT), Sweden is the largest European country with the fewest limits on where people can go and what they can do.

People were out and about among the blooming cherry trees in Stockholm this week. AP
Schools for children up to the age of 16 remain open, many people continue to go to work and packed commuter trains and buses were reported this week in the capital, Stockholm. “Clearly, Sweden stands out at the moment,” said Carl Bildt, the former prime minister.
Swedish authorities have banned public gatherings of more than 500 people, closed universities and higher education colleges, and advised workers to stay at home if possible. Authorities on Tuesday ordered restaurants and bars only to serve people at tables rather than at the bar.
Local media have been full of stories of thousands of people gathering at Swedish ski resorts, which until Saturday kept their nightlife open. The virus has previously spread easily in mountain resorts in Austria and Italy.
Johan Carlson, head of Sweden’s public health agency, last week defended Sweden’s approach, saying the country “cannot take draconian measures that have a limited impact on the epidemic but knock out the functions of society”.

But he conceded that the 90,000 figure for the number of people who die annually in Sweden would “increase significantly” if its healthcare system became overburdened.
There have been just over 2000 reported COVID-19 cases in Sweden and 33 deaths. That compares with more than 6000 deaths in Italy, Europe’s worst-affected country.
“The future still looks manageable,” said Anders Tegnell, Sweden’s state epidemiologist who has become one of the public faces of the outbreak. He argued that schools needed to stay open to provide childcare for health workers, noting that young people appeared to have much lower infection rates.
But a significant number of Swedish health experts disagree. Mr Tegnell has faced a barrage of criticism after details of the country’s antivirus tactics leaked to Swedish TV at the weekend.
Joacim Rocklov, an epidemiologist at Umea University, said the Swedish authorities were taking huge risks with public health when so much remained unknown about coronavirus.
“I do not see why Sweden would be so different from other countries. It is a huge experiment,” he told the Financial Times. “We have no idea — it could work out. But it could also go crazily in the wrong direction.”
Swedish authorities have said they are not explicitly pursuing a strategy of “herd immunity”, where a large segment of the population contracts the virus in order for society to build up immunity. The UK’s chief scientific adviser had previously suggested that Britain adopt such an approach before the government backtracked.
The lockdowns are stripping the services sector to the bone.
Related
Recessionary wave breaks over bunkered Europe
Sweden is instead seeking to slow the spread of infections and ensure that its health system does not become overwhelmed. Mr Bildt said the situation on the streets of Stockholm had changed “dramatically” in recent weeks despite the absence of legal restrictions, with far fewer people going outside.
But Mr Rocklov said it was not yet known how long immunity to COVID-19 would last. “There is a big risk that Sweden would have to go into quarantine when the health system goes into crisis,” he added.
Sweden’s relaxed approach contrasts with its Nordic neighbours. Denmark, Norway and Finland have closed schools, sealed their borders and imposed other restrictions.
Stefan Lofven, Sweden’s centre-left prime minister, has called on everyone to play a part in stopping the virus from spreading by, for instance, not visiting elderly relatives and working from home. He used a televised address to the nation on Sunday to warn that more restrictive measures might come as he conceded the next few months would be difficult.
“There are a few crucial moments in life when you have to make sacrifices, not only for your own sake but also in order to take responsibility for the people around you, for your fellow human beings, and for our country. That moment is now. That day is here. And that duty belongs to everyone,” he said.
Sweden’s strategy has also been criticised for a different reason, with some arguing that even the lighter measures could cause huge damage to the economy. Kerstin Hessius, a prominent fund manager, is one of those arguing that the country may be swapping one disaster for an even worse one.
Her views provoked a riposte from Leif Ostling, former chief executive of truckmaker Scania, who accused her of living in a “financial bubble”. He urged Swedes not to become cynical and to hold to their “humanist viewpoint”.
Mr Rocklov said it was a “valid discussion” to have over whether the measures aimed at saving lives may do even more damage. But he also said Swedish authorities were not giving enough information for people to make up their own mind.
“More and more experts are feeling uneasy with this stewardship. It is not allowing for an open debate. It is rather trying to push down and make people quiet,” he said.
Financial Times
How the coronavirus is changing markets, business and politics.
Coronavirus: Need to know. Our daily reporting, in your inbox.
Sign up now
Thank you :)
 

Val Keating

Norm Smith Medallist
Dec 27, 2017
8,289
17,960
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Sweden bucks global trend with experimental virus strategy
Richard Milne
Mar 26, 2020 – 7.46am



Oslo | Sweden has become an international outlier in its response to the deadly coronavirus outbreak by keeping schools open and adopting few other restrictions, as the Scandinavian nation embarks on what one health expert called a “huge experiment”.
Since the UK went into lockdown on Monday evening (Tuesday AEDT), Sweden is the largest European country with the fewest limits on where people can go and what they can do.

People were out and about among the blooming cherry trees in Stockholm this week. AP
Schools for children up to the age of 16 remain open, many people continue to go to work and packed commuter trains and buses were reported this week in the capital, Stockholm. “Clearly, Sweden stands out at the moment,” said Carl Bildt, the former prime minister.
Swedish authorities have banned public gatherings of more than 500 people, closed universities and higher education colleges, and advised workers to stay at home if possible. Authorities on Tuesday ordered restaurants and bars only to serve people at tables rather than at the bar.
Local media have been full of stories of thousands of people gathering at Swedish ski resorts, which until Saturday kept their nightlife open. The virus has previously spread easily in mountain resorts in Austria and Italy.
Johan Carlson, head of Sweden’s public health agency, last week defended Sweden’s approach, saying the country “cannot take draconian measures that have a limited impact on the epidemic but knock out the functions of society”.

But he conceded that the 90,000 figure for the number of people who die annually in Sweden would “increase significantly” if its healthcare system became overburdened.
There have been just over 2000 reported COVID-19 cases in Sweden and 33 deaths. That compares with more than 6000 deaths in Italy, Europe’s worst-affected country.
“The future still looks manageable,” said Anders Tegnell, Sweden’s state epidemiologist who has become one of the public faces of the outbreak. He argued that schools needed to stay open to provide childcare for health workers, noting that young people appeared to have much lower infection rates.
But a significant number of Swedish health experts disagree. Mr Tegnell has faced a barrage of criticism after details of the country’s antivirus tactics leaked to Swedish TV at the weekend.
Joacim Rocklov, an epidemiologist at Umea University, said the Swedish authorities were taking huge risks with public health when so much remained unknown about coronavirus.
“I do not see why Sweden would be so different from other countries. It is a huge experiment,” he told the Financial Times. “We have no idea — it could work out. But it could also go crazily in the wrong direction.”
Swedish authorities have said they are not explicitly pursuing a strategy of “herd immunity”, where a large segment of the population contracts the virus in order for society to build up immunity. The UK’s chief scientific adviser had previously suggested that Britain adopt such an approach before the government backtracked.
The lockdowns are stripping the services sector to the bone.
Related
Recessionary wave breaks over bunkered Europe
Sweden is instead seeking to slow the spread of infections and ensure that its health system does not become overwhelmed. Mr Bildt said the situation on the streets of Stockholm had changed “dramatically” in recent weeks despite the absence of legal restrictions, with far fewer people going outside.
But Mr Rocklov said it was not yet known how long immunity to COVID-19 would last. “There is a big risk that Sweden would have to go into quarantine when the health system goes into crisis,” he added.
Sweden’s relaxed approach contrasts with its Nordic neighbours. Denmark, Norway and Finland have closed schools, sealed their borders and imposed other restrictions.
Stefan Lofven, Sweden’s centre-left prime minister, has called on everyone to play a part in stopping the virus from spreading by, for instance, not visiting elderly relatives and working from home. He used a televised address to the nation on Sunday to warn that more restrictive measures might come as he conceded the next few months would be difficult.
“There are a few crucial moments in life when you have to make sacrifices, not only for your own sake but also in order to take responsibility for the people around you, for your fellow human beings, and for our country. That moment is now. That day is here. And that duty belongs to everyone,” he said.
Sweden’s strategy has also been criticised for a different reason, with some arguing that even the lighter measures could cause huge damage to the economy. Kerstin Hessius, a prominent fund manager, is one of those arguing that the country may be swapping one disaster for an even worse one.
Her views provoked a riposte from Leif Ostling, former chief executive of truckmaker Scania, who accused her of living in a “financial bubble”. He urged Swedes not to become cynical and to hold to their “humanist viewpoint”.
Mr Rocklov said it was a “valid discussion” to have over whether the measures aimed at saving lives may do even more damage. But he also said Swedish authorities were not giving enough information for people to make up their own mind.
“More and more experts are feeling uneasy with this stewardship. It is not allowing for an open debate. It is rather trying to push down and make people quiet,” he said.
Financial Times
How the coronavirus is changing markets, business and politics.
Coronavirus: Need to know. Our daily reporting, in your inbox.
Sign up now

It’s going to be fascinating seeing how the different models play out. Game changer
 

Tas

Premium Gold
Dec 23, 2002
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There can be only one...
It’s going to be fascinating seeing how the different models play out. Game changer
I think the smaller the population and the lower the population density, the more it is doable.

I think it was what UK wanted to do but their infection rates were climbing at alarming rates and they knew their health care system wouldn't be able to cope.

I think it is telling that the EU hasn't used neighbouring countries to take the load off of congested nations like Italy and Spain so that when they get over the hump then Germany and other countries could utilise neighbours. It has been everyone for themselves and borders which were meant to have been gone all of a sudden blocked and confiscating any medical equipment that is moving across borders.
 

Snake_Baker

L'enfant terrible
Apr 24, 2013
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The rate being so much higher in men, is that the same as other countries? Heaps of Italian men are smokers.
I have already answered this mate. It's the effect of higher testosterone production on thymus shrinkage.

It's the trade off males get for strength, speed and aggression.
 

Val Keating

Norm Smith Medallist
Dec 27, 2017
8,289
17,960
AFL Club
North Melbourne
I think the smaller the population and the lower the population density, the more it is doable.

I think it was what UK wanted to do but their infection rates were climbing at alarming rates and they knew their health care system wouldn't be able to cope.

I think it is telling that the EU hasn't used neighbouring countries to take the load off of congested nations like Italy and Spain so that when they get over the hump then Germany and other countries could utilise neighbours. It has been everyone for themselves and borders which were meant to have been gone all of a sudden blocked and confiscating any medical equipment that is moving across borders.

They already have more cases and more deaths then Australia.

Yeah it’s seems every county is just focusing on getting their own backyard sorted. No one cares about Brexit anymore that’s for sure.
 
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