Crime writers Marshall, Blackburn, Warner & former unfortunate CSK 'suspects' & POI

petedavo

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Are you one the cops that didn't like her book?

We have hard copy reference. Someone who spent time with the cops.

Yeah, not sure Im ready to take some online randos opinion about something being fiction.

Do you have anything to eliminate it? You obviously know the story. Sounding desperate to get rid of it.

Oh thats right, there was a CCC investigation. Someones wife ended up dead in the process.

The husband ended up being names as the one and only suspect, who promptly sued the WA Police Force for defamation after the whole case being thrown out of court.
Are you now trying to bring Corrinne Rayney into this?
I thought he was talking about the death of
Sharee Gai Lindley

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And Lance had no involvement whatsoever. I felt so much for Lance and his family.The treatment of him shows exactly what can happen when total focus without evidence is used coupled with mates in the media and the pounding of fists on the chests like tarzan. Where are those same cops now? Were they held to account? The media also need some very deep soul searching.
Not completely across the legalities of this but it's in my understanding that as soon as a police officer quits the force any case against them for misconduct ceases immediately. This would most likely apply to any other separate cases that are raised in the future with CCC after resignation.

We saw an example of this with Caporn who resigned from his position as Assistant Police Commissioner during the mallard CCC investigation, to "take up a position with FESA."

"Police Commissioner Karl O'Callaghan today accepted Mr Caporn's resignation from WA Police, which was a decision entirely of Mr Caporn's making.
"As he is no longer a serving officer, the current evaluation by police of the findings against Mr Caporn by acting CCC commissioner Dunford with regard to Andrew Mallard will cease immediately," Mr O'Callaghan said

https://www.watoday.com.au/national...orn-resigns-from-wa-police-20090211-8443.html

"If the CCC had found that they had acted corruptly or committed a criminal act like perversion of the course of justice, then we could have charged any of the public officers involved in that with a criminal offence and there would have been a more clear process," Mr O'Callaghan said.
But unfortunately once we go to misconduct it's down to the employer to take action and once someone is not in employment, it then becomes very difficult to bring it to resolution."
https://thewest.com.au/news/wa/ccc-mallard-probe-pointless-ng-ya-196445


Something seriously wrong in that loop hole.
I'm not sure what legal process/action or avenue the family of Lance Williams would need to take in order to get some form of justice for what their now deceased son and the entire family had to endure, but I hope if there is a way for them to do it, they go in hard!
R.I.P Lance Williams
 
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Melsy

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I dare say, there will be further witness that did not trust investigators earlier in the investigation.

Imagine some other witnesses seeing Steve Ross, defamed with alleged implication because he allegedly inserted himself in the crime.

Who would go to the police in fear of being called, whacko, tinfloil hat, loony, attention seeker. Talk about hinder an investigation - obstruction of justice even.
 

Beatnicked

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I dare say, there will be further witness that did not trust investigators earlier in the investigation.

Imagine some other witnesses seeing Steve Ross, defamed with alleged implication because he allegedly inserted himself in the crime.

Who would go to the police in fear of being called, whacko, tinfloil hat, loony, attention seeker. Talk about hinder an investigation - obstruction of justice even.
He didn't 'insert' himself. He too as a valid witness that too was hounded. So too his landlord Mr Weygers. I wonder if the person or persons who fed the cops with spurious and vexacious claims will be charged with anything?
 

sprockets

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A series of novels about a serial killer written by an Author living in WA. Third one hasn't been published yet.


https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00DAHD3U4/ref=dbs_a_w_dp_b00dahd3u4

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00DB3ZJFY/ref=dbs_a_w_dp_b00db3zjfy

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Kaye Edwards (Author):

"... I started writing eighteen years ago, beginning with heartfelt poetry and after being let down yet again by a man, planned to do something terrible to him."
 
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For some reason, I am getting no notifications for this thread even though I'm "Watching" it
Have noticed the same issue of not getting notifications of threads I'm "watching" I think what happens is if you haven't been on for a day or clicked on any of the notifications for posts on the watched threads they drop off. Now that you've made a post on here you may start getting them again. You should now get a notification for my reply.
If not, then I'm unsure what's going on.
:)
 

petedavo

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Can stories of murder inspire real life killings?
You betcha!
Back in the 1920's Arthur Upfield was working on one of his Boney Detective Novels along the Rabbit Proof Fence and discussed the murder plot for his upcoming book. Snowy Rowles overheard Upfield discussing the method of disposal of the bodies that he was using in the upcoming novel, The Sands of Windee, and used the same technique when he murdered three people. The very fact that the real life murder emulated parts of the novel before it was published, helped police solve the crime.

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petedavo

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Not completely across the legalities of this but it's in my understanding that as soon as a police officer quits the force any case against them for misconduct ceases immediately. This would most likely apply to any other separate cases that are raised in the future with CCC after resignation.

We saw an example of this with Caporn who resigned from his position as Assistant Police Commissioner during the mallard CCC investigation, to "take up a position with FESA."

"Police Commissioner Karl O'Callaghan today accepted Mr Caporn's resignation from WA Police, which was a decision entirely of Mr Caporn's making.
"As he is no longer a serving officer, the current evaluation by police of the findings against Mr Caporn by acting CCC commissioner Dunford with regard to Andrew Mallard will cease immediately," Mr O'Callaghan said

https://www.watoday.com.au/national...orn-resigns-from-wa-police-20090211-8443.html

"If the CCC had found that they had acted corruptly or committed a criminal act like perversion of the course of justice, then we could have charged any of the public officers involved in that with a criminal offence and there would have been a more clear process," Mr O'Callaghan said.
But unfortunately once we go to misconduct it's down to the employer to take action and once someone is not in employment, it then becomes very difficult to bring it to resolution."
https://thewest.com.au/news/wa/ccc-mallard-probe-pointless-ng-ya-196445


Something seriously wrong in that loop hole.
I'm not sure what legal process/action or avenue the family of Lance Williams would need to take in order to get some form of justice for what their now deceased son and the entire family had to endure, but I hope if there is a way for them to do it, they go in hard!
R.I.P Lance Williams
Bob Silich had retired, but was still charged with corruption and received a 2 year suspended prison sentence 4 years after he had retired.
http://thewest2.smedia.com.au/Olive...px?href=WAN/2008/04/10&id=Ar00500&sk=ABD6EDD5
I'm aware of others, such as Robert David Critchley, being charged with offences by IAU after they had already resigned. Capon seems to be the exception, rather than the norm.
http://thewest2.smedia.com.au/Olive...px?href=WAN/2011/01/15&id=Ar01301&sk=9A45670B
Found guilty
http://thewest2.smedia.com.au/Olive...px?href=WAN/2011/12/03&id=Ar00406&sk=096A48C7
Sentenced
http://thewest2.smedia.com.au/Olive...px?href=WAN/2012/02/28&id=Ar01102&sk=B4641F01
Critchley appealed his conviction after serving 7 months of his imprisonment, and the Appeal Judges quashed the conviction and ordered a retrial, where upon the DPP withdrew from prosecuting it again.
http://thewest2.smedia.com.au/Olive...px?href=WAN/2013/02/15&id=Ar01602&sk=FB745176
It would appear that having resigned does not normally prevent an Officer being charged or prosecuted if it's in the public interest to do so.
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Bob Silich had retired, but was still charged with corruption and received a 2 year suspended prison sentence 4 years after he had retired.
http://thewest2.smedia.com.au/Olive...px?href=WAN/2008/04/10&id=Ar00500&sk=ABD6EDD5
I'm aware of others, such as Robert David Critchley, being charged with offences by IAU after they had already resigned. Capon seems to be the exception, rather than the norm.
http://thewest2.smedia.com.au/Olive...px?href=WAN/2011/01/15&id=Ar01301&sk=9A45670B
Found guilty
http://thewest2.smedia.com.au/Olive...px?href=WAN/2011/12/03&id=Ar00406&sk=096A48C7
Sentenced
http://thewest2.smedia.com.au/Olive...px?href=WAN/2012/02/28&id=Ar01102&sk=B4641F01
Critchley appealed his conviction after serving 7 months of his imprisonment, and the Appeal Judges quashed the conviction and ordered a retrial, where upon the DPP withdrew from prosecuting it again.
http://thewest2.smedia.com.au/Olive...px?href=WAN/2013/02/15&id=Ar01602&sk=FB745176
It would appear that having resigned does not normally prevent an Officer being charged or prosecuted if it's in the public interest to do so.
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Thanks for posting these separate examples of officers being charged after resignation.

The CCC inquiry into the wrongful conviction of Mr Mallard for the murder of Pamela Lawrence recommended disciplinary action be considered for Mal Shervill and David Caporn.
The CCC report included four opinions of misconduct against Mr Shervill, who as a detective sergeant at the time led the murder investigation and two against Mr Caporn, who as a detective sergeant at the time worked on the investigation.

Both Shervill and Caporn resigned from their public posts during the CCC inquiry, avoiding action.
Looks like Shervill and Caporn were an exception to the rule and not the norm.

In this report
"Improving the working relationship between the Corruption and Crime Commission and
 Western Australia Police"
From March 2015


"A series of matters were raised with the Committee by these two agencies since the commencement of the 39th Parliament which indicated that the working relationship was under some strain. These tensions relate to significant differences between WAPOL and the CCC over a diverse range of operational issues such as:"


* whether the CCC may include findings of fact in its reports over investigations involving police officers 


Chapter 2 Pages 29-31

http://www.parliament.wa.gov.au/Par...$file/Report 18- Tensions Inquiry- FINAL.pdf

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petedavo

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Thanks for posting these separate examples of officers being charged after resignation.

The CCC inquiry into the wrongful conviction of Mr Mallard for the murder of Pamela Lawrence recommended disciplinary action be considered for Mal Shervill and David Caporn.
The CCC report included four opinions of misconduct against Mr Shervill, who as a detective sergeant at the time led the murder investigation and two against Mr Caporn, who as a detective sergeant at the time worked on the investigation.

Both Shervill and Caporn resigned from their public posts during the CCC inquiry, avoiding action.
Looks like Shervill and Caporn were an exception to the rule and not the norm.

In this report
"Improving the working relationship between the Corruption and Crime Commission and
 Western Australia Police"
From March 2015


"A series of matters were raised with the Committee by these two agencies since the commencement of the 39th Parliament which indicated that the working relationship was under some strain. These tensions relate to significant differences between WAPOL and the CCC over a diverse range of operational issues such as:"


* whether the CCC may include findings of fact in its reports over investigations involving police officers 


Chapter 2 Pages 29-31

http://www.parliament.wa.gov.au/Par...$file/Report 18- Tensions Inquiry- FINAL.pdf

View attachment 604473 View attachment 604474 View attachment 604475
This is interesting, because I know of at least one example that contradicts these, where a Senior Constable Arduino Silvestri was charged due to findings by the CCC, and his resignation obviously didn't have any affect upon the decision to prosecute him based upon those findings.
http://thewest2.smedia.com.au/Olive...px?href=WAN/2008/02/28&id=Ar01104&sk=2B0909EF
He was sentenced to 12 months Goal
http://thewest2.smedia.com.au/Olive...px?href=WAN/2008/11/08&id=Ar01702&sk=3EA0E69B

Politicians on the over hand.....
http://thewest2.smedia.com.au/Olive...px?href=WAN/2007/06/07&id=Ar01500&sk=6AC089F3

One could be forgiven, for thinking that decisions to prosecute were based upon rank and status, rather than public interest. But you'd have to get a statement from the DPP to confirm such an opinion having any factual basis, and there isn't one.

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Can stories of murder inspire real life killings?
You betcha!
Back in the 1920's Arthur Upfield was working on one of his Boney Detective Novels along the Rabbit Proof Fence and discussed the murder plot for his upcoming book. Snowy Rowles overheard Upfield discussing the method of disposal of the bodies that he was using in the upcoming novel, The Sands of Windee, and used the same technique when he murdered three people. The very fact that the real life murder emulated parts of the novel before it was published, helped police solve the crime.

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weird fact I only found out about four years ago... I'm related to him on my Dad's side but I could never find a link that would let me watch the docos on him on the ABC
 
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Have noticed the same issue of not getting notifications of threads I'm "watching" I think what happens is if you haven't been on for a day or clicked on any of the notifications for posts on the watched threads they drop off. Now that you've made a post on here you may start getting them again. You should now get a notification for my reply.
If not, then I'm unsure what's going on.
:)
Thanks Sorbet, it did
 
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Anyone know what year the Madora bay property was purchased?
It was built in 1984, sold to the family of the accused in June 1988 and then sold in June 2016, also seems strange that when you look at the Madora Bay house on Google streetview they have blurred out what looks to be an old couch on the front porch, perhaps this was taken as evidence by WAPOL

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Melsy

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It was built in 1984, sold to the family of the accused in June 1988 and then sold in June 2016, also seems strange that when you look at the Madora Bay house on Google streetview they have blurred out what looks to be an old couch on the front porch, perhaps this was taken as evidence by WAPOL
Thankyou! June 1988. Do you have a day date?
 

Beatnicked

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It was built in 1984, sold to the family of the accused in June 1988 and then sold in June 2016, also seems strange that when you look at the Madora Bay house on Google streetview they have blurred out what looks to be an old couch on the front porch, perhaps this was taken as evidence by WAPOL

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Very interesting. Great pickup! Do you know year of street view?
 
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