Danny Frawley CTE

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Satan

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Some of it
Like polly farmer

There will be others sadly


Footy champ Danny Frawley was suffering from a crippling neurological disorder linked to repeated head knocks at the time of his death.

An analysis of Frawley’s brain has been handed to the Victorian Coroner showing the St Kilda legend suffered from Stage II CTE - chronic traumatic encephalopathy - when his four-wheel drive struck a tree in Millbrook, near Ballan, on September 9 last year.

CTE can only be diagnosed after death.
Frawley’s wife, Anita, confirmed the finding, saying she hopes it will “prevent other families from going through what we did”.

“Our hearts would break seeing others go through the emotions we went through,” Anita said.

“This is an issue for the community, it is not about a particular sport or sports, we need more research to diagnose and assist people living with the disease.”

There is growing concern over the long-term consequences of concussions in contact sports.

Anita said her late husband, who died at 56, had lived with depression for many years and the diagnosis has helped the family better understand the impact of brain injuries in the community.

“His mental health battles, and his strong advocacy for mental health issues, were well known,” she said.
 

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Inspecta Gadget

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as the consequences of CTE gathers speed I wonder what contact sports will look like in 30 years
It's hard to say where the current crop of players will be at in 30 years. I think we're light years ahead of where we were 30 years ago in terms of diagnosis and treatment of concussion, so who knows, maybe we're already trending significantly in the right direction without knowing it.

Without drastic rule changes it'd be nigh on impossible to eliminate concussions from contact sports.
 

master bate

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It's hard to say where the current crop of players will be at in 30 years. I think we're light years ahead of where we were 30 years ago in terms of diagnosis and treatment of concussion, so who knows, maybe we're already trending significantly in the right direction without knowing it.

Without drastic rule changes it'd be nigh on impossible to eliminate concussions from contact sports.
We're still a long way behind we're we should be though with needless mistakes.

Like how and why was Josh Kennedy able to go back on? Surely he should've been taken straight off for a head injury assessment at the free kick. It was a huge hit.

And players get concussed and come out and sit on the bench. Shouldn't there be some kind of quiet room for players to rest and start to rehab immediately with low stimuli?
 

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cfc to aufc

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We're still a long way behind we're we should be though with needless mistakes.

Like how and why was Josh Kennedy able to go back on? Surely he should've been taken straight off for a head injury assessment at the free kick. It was a huge hit.

And players get concussed and come out and sit on the bench. Shouldn't there be some kind of quiet room for players to rest and start to rehab immediately with low stimuli?
what do they do at the lower levels of the game
 

LoungeLizard

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There was a survey done awhile ago, they asked athletes if they could take a drug to guarantee a gold medal, but it would kill them, would you take it.
Something like 85% said yes.

I think footballers are now aware of the risks in footy, i don't think they are worried too much.
 

demondavey

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Frawley had also stopped taking depression medication at the time of his death. Interesting development but not sure where it fits in.
It definitely wouldn’t have helped. From experience as someone who takes an anti anxiety medication, when I stop taking it I can feel pretty jittery and edgy within 24 hours. That can then lead to getting a bit peaked over things that would have previously been manageable. That can be the equivalent of blowing something out of proportion and then feeling really low afterwards. That’s only my experience, but it is something that is most definitely not recommended to do without medical advice.

Depending on the severity of his illness, this may or may not have contributed to his decisions and or mind set.
 

HTPunter

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Yeah I always thought it was stupid that players have to sit on the bench for a couple hours instead of recovering properly from an injury. Regressive
Yep, concussion or otherwise. Same when star players get 'managed' on the bench for the last parts of game, but they just sit there getting cold instead of initiating recovery. Weird part.
 

Bunk Moreland

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We're still a long way behind we're we should be though with needless mistakes.

Like how and why was Josh Kennedy able to go back on? Surely he should've been taken straight off for a head injury assessment at the free kick. It was a huge hit.

And players get concussed and come out and sit on the bench. Shouldn't there be some kind of quiet room for players to rest and start to rehab immediately with low stimuli?

Check out the return periods after each incident:

 

kickazz

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There was a survey done awhile ago, they asked athletes if they could take a drug to guarantee a gold medal, but it would kill them, would you take it.
Something like 85% said yes.

I think footballers are now aware of the risks in footy, i don't think they are worried too much.

I recon it's more a case of one's perspective on life when in your twenties - you want the good times to keep rolling and life is sh*t once you're older than 35 or so, so what's the difference if you make it a bit worse?

Then you reach that age and realise you were wrong.
 

LoungeLizard

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I recon it's more a case of one's perspective on life when in your twenties - you want the good times to keep rolling and life is sh*t once you're older than 35 or so, so what's the difference if you make it a bit worse?

Then you reach that age and realise you were wrong.
I collected a few footy injuries when i was young, they effect me now, would i play again if i was given a chance to turn back time? yep

I bet most footballers would say the same.
 

Altum Volantes

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It’s a tough one...it’s been a ‘thing’ in the NFL for a few years now, unsure of the impact it’s had on the current processes in place to protect the players.

I think it’s just the nature of high contact sport - whether it be Aussie Rules, American Football, Pro Wrestling etc

We also section this off to be a ‘professional sport’ issue - but does it extend to your average ammos stalwart who dedicates 150 Sundays to local footy?...
 

nobbyiscool

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as the consequences of CTE gathers speed I wonder what contact sports will look like in 30 years
30 years might not be long enough. Sporting codes across the globe have spent decades burying their knowledge of brain injuries - one of the many lawsuits against the NFL related to their knowledge of a link between football and brain injuries as far back as 1998. It's taken them til the last 7-8 years to start taking action, and it's still not action that will prevent CTE. Some of the research is really terrifying - there was a case in the US where a guy who only played a couple of years of college football developed CTE and took his own life; there have been symptoms of CTE discovered in soccer players just from heading a ball. There's a theory that you don't even need a direct blow to the head to contribute to brain injuries, just the whiplash effect can do it.

If sport ever truly took this seriously it would be non-contact, because the research from the US suggests this is epidemic - it's just been covered up. Think I'm being dramatic? Google Jovan Belcher; Aaron Hernandez, at just 27, was found to have the most advanced case seen in someone that age when he murdered one, and probably three people. Google wrestler Chris Benoit.

Boston University said in 2017 that, of 111 brains belonging to former NFL players that they'd examined, 110 had signs of CTE.

The only surprise here is that we haven't heard more about CTE in Australia.
 

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