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haydo

Premium Platinum
Dec 23, 2006
13,539
21,375
AFL Club
Adelaide
I had some ups over february but ended back down where i was near xmas by march again. A lot of drama which i can't mention publicly around friends has got me up sleepless at night, not to mention all the sh*t and the world at the moment. I'm just so confused by other people and the way people can act sometimes, i just wished things made sesne more often than not
Sorry to hear that mate, you're one of my fav people on here so if you need to talk, just PM me
 

I Lost My Keays

Brownlow Medallist
Aug 20, 2013
18,723
21,138
Adelaide
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fu** the last few weeks

My dad lost his job and has expressed depression to a new level with suicidal thoughts and he’s in hospital at the moment

Lost mass amount of hours at work
Struggling at Uni due to motivation due to my dad And work.

I’m thinking to message my tutors about what’s going on with my dad and why I haven’t attended the Zoom meetings. I’m hoping I can type some information about the weeks I missed and it counts towards the attendance.
 

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John Who

Norm Smith Medallist
Apr 16, 2017
6,848
4,738
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it doesn’t make you weak to admit that you need help, it will make you stronger because you accepted that help.

Take care and stay safe. To the frontline health care workers thank you for your courage and empathy.
I just want to expand on this because I truly feel it's an essential thought process for everyone (mental illness or otherwise). If one has a cough and fever and their body is physically drained, I'm almost certain he/she wouldn't mind seeking treatment or asking for help. So by the same token, if the brain is unwell, and it can't think or feel as it normally does, please don't ignore it. Self-help with diet/exercise, or if it's getting worse, seek for a professional opinion.

Bottom line IMO, mental health and physical health is just as important as each other. You need both to truly feel "alive".
 

John Who

Norm Smith Medallist
Apr 16, 2017
6,848
4,738
AFL Club
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I have to admit, I've had an increase in anxiety of late. The restriction on movements and access to normal things has resulted in a gradual increase in nervous energy. I feel it in my chest at certain times. Part of it stems from the fact that I have elderly friends and relatives interstate who are very much in the vulnerable group, and I have no way of accessing them due to the closed borders. If something were to happen to them, I won't see them again. The other connection I just made is due to an experience I had last year when I was having my shoulder MRIed. I'm a big guy and it was a very small machine. I was jammed in there tighter than a sardine. My face was 2mm from the top and I had my first experience with claustrophobia - something I'd never properly appreciated before. When you're in the machine, they give you a little remote control with an emergency button on it in case you need to communicate with the staff, but my arm was so numb from being wedged in the machine, I couldn't press the button. I yelled out that I needed to come out, but they couldn't hear me over the machine noise, so I was stuck in a claustrophobic panic for nearly 30 minutes. That feeling of confinement was very profound and I'm pretty sure I got some PTSD out of it. I've noticed a few times since that any feeling of confinement gives me some echo of that feeling. Despite being at home being very different in nature, I think the confinement aspect of home isolation has triggered a bit of that PTSD.

I'm dealing with the anxiety by exercising a lot and taking on some new projects. I bought a bunch of wood, screws and other things so I could build some things for the house. I've started building a desk this week. It's coming along nicely. I've noticed that when I'm working on this project, the anxiety levels drop significantly. The key is to stay occupied and not dwell on things you can't control.

How is everyone else doing?
I always enjoy reading your input on this thread. I tend to learn a thing or two from your descriptive posts! :)

From my end, I'm witnessing a lot of genuine fear in others regarding this current pandemic. I think a lot of it is due to all the uncertainties, be it of a physical aspect, a mental or a financial aspect. Patients are being more careful with opening doors, asking for hand sanitisers to wash hands more often, and asking a lot more questions than prior to all this pandemic. Almost everyone is impacted by this either directly or indirectly (eg. relatives, friends, workmates).

Regarding your recent MRI experience, that definitely sounds like you had a panic attack, and often PTSD can result from extreme levels of anxiety relating to a high sense of threat to your well-being. You are quite right with your plan of combating the situation - exercise, keeping your mind preoccupied. Another method which might help you further is to correct any possible false assumptions or alter constant negative ruminations. For example:
"whenever I go in an MRI machine in the future, I fear I might get another panic attack".
You can change the thought perhaps into:
"next time I go in an MRI, I'll make sure to tell my doctor or radiographer what happened the last time. So hopefully next time I will feel more in control".

Also, panic attacks and PTSD can be seriously debilitating. If it's getting worse, please see your GP for further advice.
 

Nugett

Premiership Player
Apr 2, 2017
4,395
5,015
AFL Club
Hawthorn
I just want to expand on this because I truly feel it's an essential thought process for everyone (mental illness or otherwise). If one has a cough and fever and their body is physically drained, I'm almost certain he/she wouldn't mind seeking treatment or asking for help. So by the same token, if the brain is unwell, and it can't think or feel as it normally does, please don't ignore it. Self-help with diet/exercise, or if it's getting worse, seek for a professional opinion.
Bottom line IMO, mental health and physical health is just as important as each other. You need both to truly feel "alive".
totally agree. Mind, body and soul are essential ingredients for a much healthier life. If one is out of whack, it soon affects the other aspects.
 

Ando727

Norm Smith Medallist
Dec 12, 2009
6,055
12,645
Hobart
AFL Club
Melbourne
I always enjoy reading your input on this thread. I tend to learn a thing or two from your descriptive posts! :)

From my end, I'm witnessing a lot of genuine fear in others regarding this current pandemic. I think a lot of it is due to all the uncertainties, be it of a physical aspect, a mental or a financial aspect. Patients are being more careful with opening doors, asking for hand sanitisers to wash hands more often, and asking a lot more questions than prior to all this pandemic. Almost everyone is impacted by this either directly or indirectly (eg. relatives, friends, workmates).

Regarding your recent MRI experience, that definitely sounds like you had a panic attack, and often PTSD can result from extreme levels of anxiety relating to a high sense of threat to your well-being. You are quite right with your plan of combating the situation - exercise, keeping your mind preoccupied. Another method which might help you further is to correct any possible false assumptions or alter constant negative ruminations. For example:
"whenever I go in an MRI machine in the future, I fear I might get another panic attack".
You can change the thought perhaps into:
"next time I go in an MRI, I'll make sure to tell my doctor or radiographer what happened the last time. So hopefully next time I will feel more in control".

Also, panic attacks and PTSD can be seriously debilitating. If it's getting worse, please see your GP for further advice.
Thankyou, my friend. I'm doing ok. Been managing well this week. Your point is well made - if I need another MRI in future, I can't be avoiding them. I plan to seek out the facility with the biggest machine possible, and I won't put myself in the situation of allowing myself to be jammed into a machine that's too small for me to extricate myself from. Now that I understand the potentiality of this procedure, I just need to make sure things are suitable for me. In the past I never had any worries about such machines - in fact I used to volunteer to be in fMRI and PET studies to help with medical research. This was just the first time I'd ever been in a machine that wasn't suitable for my body size - or more specifically, the shoulder scan presents a specific problem in that they have to centralise the body part being scanned, and the shoulder is extremely distal from the centreline of the body. I have no doubt that if I'd needed a pelvic or cranial scan, I would have been fine in that machine. But, life is full of learning experiences. I'll know what to expect next time!

Happy Easter, mate!
 

John Who

Norm Smith Medallist
Apr 16, 2017
6,848
4,738
AFL Club
Adelaide
Thankyou, my friend. I'm doing ok. Been managing well this week. Your point is well made - if I need another MRI in future, I can't be avoiding them. I plan to seek out the facility with the biggest machine possible, and I won't put myself in the situation of allowing myself to be jammed into a machine that's too small for me to extricate myself from. Now that I understand the potentiality of this procedure, I just need to make sure things are suitable for me. In the past I never had any worries about such machines - in fact I used to volunteer to be in fMRI and PET studies to help with medical research. This was just the first time I'd ever been in a machine that wasn't suitable for my body size - or more specifically, the shoulder scan presents a specific problem in that they have to centralise the body part being scanned, and the shoulder is extremely distal from the centreline of the body. I have no doubt that if I'd needed a pelvic or cranial scan, I would have been fine in that machine. But, life is full of learning experiences. I'll know what to expect next time!

Happy Easter, mate!
Another way to help your cause: lose some weight and stop getting anymore shoulder injuries! :D
Happy Easter to you too mate!
 

Ando727

Norm Smith Medallist
Dec 12, 2009
6,055
12,645
Hobart
AFL Club
Melbourne
Another way to help your cause: lose some weight and stop getting anymore shoulder injuries! :D
Happy Easter to you too mate!
Actually I started doing a ketogenic diet this year and I'm getting pretty trim now :) But I still think I was just too big across the shoulders for that machine! Stopping getting shoulder injuries is an excellent tip though - I'm going to use that one.;)
 

John Who

Norm Smith Medallist
Apr 16, 2017
6,848
4,738
AFL Club
Adelaide
I ranted at one of my friends, and now i feel really really sh*t.

Not sure i can do this anymore
I’m not so sure ranting to a friend is useful at a time where the majority is living with fear and paranoia. Have you sought professional help via GP/psychologist/psychiatrist?

Generally, friends can be a good source of stress reduction. However if you’re quite in the deep end, friends generally won’t be able to help you unless they have the right kind of training. Have you tried medications/psychotherapy?
 

mxett

Brownlow Medallist
Jul 1, 2007
24,570
10,266
Melbourne
AFL Club
Essendon
Thankyou, my friend. I'm doing ok. Been managing well this week. Your point is well made - if I need another MRI in future, I can't be avoiding them. I plan to seek out the facility with the biggest machine possible, and I won't put myself in the situation of allowing myself to be jammed into a machine that's too small for me to extricate myself from. Now that I understand the potentiality of this procedure, I just need to make sure things are suitable for me. In the past I never had any worries about such machines - in fact I used to volunteer to be in fMRI and PET studies to help with medical research. This was just the first time I'd ever been in a machine that wasn't suitable for my body size - or more specifically, the shoulder scan presents a specific problem in that they have to centralise the body part being scanned, and the shoulder is extremely distal from the centreline of the body. I have no doubt that if I'd needed a pelvic or cranial scan, I would have been fine in that machine. But, life is full of learning experiences. I'll know what to expect next time!

Happy Easter, mate!
If you ever need another MRI let me know so I can get you into my work. If need be I could stay in the scan room with you to give you some close support, and even ensure I get you out of the bore when you need to. Dont go through another scan like that, which sounded like it wasnt performed with much consideration, especially given you seem a bit claustrophobic.

Hope your anxiety eases. I know mine has been up and down due to this social distancing, especially given things have been crazy at work in preparation for a tidal wave of COVID patients. Usually when I'm anxious I can dive into hobbies to give me some pleasure amongst the stress. But with the golf courses and driving ranges closed, plus no unnecessary travel permitted I find I'm in my head a lot more than usual.

My same old strategies are getting me through though. When I'm anxious or sad I know if I can accept these feelings as a normal reaction to the current circumstances they pass on their own. Sometimes it can take a little while but it always happens eventually.

This time will pass friends. Accept the inconvenience as best you can rather than wallowing in it. Soon enough we'll be back to booing collingwood
 

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Ando727

Norm Smith Medallist
Dec 12, 2009
6,055
12,645
Hobart
AFL Club
Melbourne
If you ever need another MRI let me know so I can get you into my work. If need be I could stay in the scan room with you to give you some close support, and even ensure I get you out of the bore when you need to. Dont go through another scan like that, which sounded like it wasnt performed with much consideration, especially given you seem a bit claustrophobic.

Hope your anxiety eases. I know mine has been up and down due to this social distancing, especially given things have been crazy at work in preparation for a tidal wave of COVID patients. Usually when I'm anxious I can dive into hobbies to give me some pleasure amongst the stress. But with the golf courses and driving ranges closed, plus no unnecessary travel permitted I find I'm in my head a lot more than usual.

My same old strategies are getting me through though. When I'm anxious or sad I know if I can accept these feelings as a normal reaction to the current circumstances they pass on their own. Sometimes it can take a little while but it always happens eventually.

This time will pass friends. Accept the inconvenience as best you can rather than wallowing in it. Soon enough we'll be back to booing collingwood
Thanks mate, that's very kind of you. I have never been claustrophobic before, but it certainly has become part of my range of reactions since that scan.

I've settled down pretty well over the past fortnight, after that nervous start to the lockdown. I'm feeling pretty relaxed and stable now. But the fact that these things pop up at all just goes to show that well-being is a constant thing to be mindful of and working at. You can't take it for granted because things can change rapidly if you go through something tough or you're not looking after yourself or taking care of your needs.
 

footy75

Premiership Player
Jun 4, 2008
3,136
2,184
Adelaide
AFL Club
Carlton
Other Teams
Norwood, Melbourne Storm
Thankyou, my friend. I'm doing ok. Been managing well this week. Your point is well made - if I need another MRI in future, I can't be avoiding them. I plan to seek out the facility with the biggest machine possible, and I won't put myself in the situation of allowing myself to be jammed into a machine that's too small for me to extricate myself from. Now that I understand the potentiality of this procedure, I just need to make sure things are suitable for me. In the past I never had any worries about such machines - in fact I used to volunteer to be in fMRI and PET studies to help with medical research. This was just the first time I'd ever been in a machine that wasn't suitable for my body size - or more specifically, the shoulder scan presents a specific problem in that they have to centralise the body part being scanned, and the shoulder is extremely distal from the centreline of the body. I have no doubt that if I'd needed a pelvic or cranial scan, I would have been fine in that machine. But, life is full of learning experiences. I'll know what to expect next time!

Happy Easter, mate!
mate i am extremely claustrophobic and have panic attacks when stuck in small spaces. i too can't handle those machines. Not saying u should do this but anytime i have to have one i take a valium.... makes it all bearable for me now. takes away all the anxiety.
 

Remboy

Senior List
Apr 24, 2014
288
1,018
AFL Club
St Kilda
totally agree. Mind, body and soul are essential ingredients for a much healthier life. If one is out of whack, it soon affects the other aspects.
It took me a long time to figure this out. I wondered why seeing psychologists amd taking anti depressants only had a limited and temporary effect.
it took a friend to explain a lot of things to me, read a number of helpful books, and found an understanding psychologist to make some lasting effects. I’m glad to say I’m in a much be space now but it’s not an easy process for anyone.
i wish everyone here the best of luck with their individual journeys. Even coming on here is a step in the right direction. Keep going and never give up.
 

Jack The Godfather

07, 09, 11
Feb 16, 2007
70,917
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On Top Of The World
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It took me a long time to figure this out. I wondered why seeing psychologists amd taking anti depressants only had a limited and temporary effect.
it took a friend to explain a lot of things to me, read a number of helpful books, and found an understanding psychologist to make some lasting effects. I’m glad to say I’m in a much be space now but it’s not an easy process for anyone.
i wish everyone here the best of luck with their individual journeys. Even coming on here is a step in the right direction. Keep going and never give up.
Can you point me in the right direction?
 

Remboy

Senior List
Apr 24, 2014
288
1,018
AFL Club
St Kilda
Can you point me in the right direction?
This is where it’s difficult. I don’t believe there one ‘right’ direction. Start with your GP and get a referral to a counsel or, psychologist or psychiatrist.
For me, just being able to open up to people was helpful. Talk to people around you. I’ve always kept to myself a fair bit but was amazed at what other people were going through as well.
Probably the big thing is keep trying and listen to yourself. If something isn’t working, change it. Change counsellors, change psychologists, change meds.
My first counsellor said he, other professionals, self help books and meds were all just resources. Different combinactions will work for different people.
If something isn’t working for you, don’t give up, change it and try something else.
As hard as it can be to be positive at times, try to believe that there is something that will work for you and you will get through it.
Good luck with it all.
 

Art Vandelay_

TheBrownDog
Oct 28, 2012
83,344
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Highly recommend. Very dark thoughts been entering my head of late and already feel better having spoken to someone about it this morning. Day 1 of the rest of my life started today. Onwards and upwards.
Best thing I did was talk to someone.

3 years on and have found inner peace in my life.

Happy with the job I've had for the last 20 months.
Moved out of home.
Found a loving partner.
Won my first sporting premiership.

Wake up every day happy, happy to still be here.
 

Aeglos

Premiership Player
Sep 27, 2016
3,405
2,556
Croydon station
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Essendon
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Riverpigs
I just want to expand on this because I truly feel it's an essential thought process for everyone (mental illness or otherwise). If one has a cough and fever and their body is physically drained, I'm almost certain he/she wouldn't mind seeking treatment or asking for help. So by the same token, if the brain is unwell, and it can't think or feel as it normally does, please don't ignore it. Self-help with diet/exercise, or if it's getting worse, seek for a professional opinion.

Bottom line IMO, mental health and physical health is just as important as each other. You need both to truly feel "alive".
The other thing is people (often) prophylactically put time and effort into their physical health (diet, exercise, sleep) when they're not sick.
How many do you reckon say the same about their mental health?
 

iBeng

Intentionally left blank
Apr 3, 2012
54,134
59,094
AFL Club
Brisbane Lions
Thought this would be a good place for this, after doing some research tonight:


For anyone who doesnt know, Dayne Beams has been doing art therapy and producing products for people to purchase and he has partnered with the non-profit organisation I linked above, each of his sales includes a donation to them as stated by his business website.


Of course not trying to convince anyone to buy his products and Im not in any way affiliated with him, you can donate directly to the organisation yourself.
 

John Who

Norm Smith Medallist
Apr 16, 2017
6,848
4,738
AFL Club
Adelaide
This is where it’s difficult. I don’t believe there one ‘right’ direction. Start with your GP and get a referral to a counsel or, psychologist or psychiatrist.
For me, just being able to open up to people was helpful. Talk to people around you. I’ve always kept to myself a fair bit but was amazed at what other people were going through as well.
Probably the big thing is keep trying and listen to yourself. If something isn’t working, change it. Change counsellors, change psychologists, change meds.
My first counsellor said he, other professionals, self help books and meds were all just resources. Different combinactions will work for different people.
If something isn’t working for you, don’t give up, change it and try something else.
As hard as it can be to be positive at times, try to believe that there is something that will work for you and you will get through it.
Good luck with it all.
The biggest tip is really to have a genuine want to improve and that it needs perseverance and plenty of patience. There is currently no known overnight cures. Everything else is just additional supports and can’t fix things unless the person himself/herself genuinely wants to get fixed.
 

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