Resource Depression/Anxiety the silent killers - everyday is RUOK day. #SpeakUpStayChatTy

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ferball

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Its a kind of Taoist version of yoga. Mostly gentle movements that are connected to breathing. It used to be used in conjunction with Chinese martial arts training. But also Tai Chi and other Chinese health practices. Sometimes spelled Qi Gong.

I used to find in intense situations that breathing slowly and imagining those moves had a really calming effect on me and enabled me to focus if I was doing them regularly as proper moves. I don't know if I'd ever say i had the sort of panic attacks you are describing tho. But it might be worth looking into if you have the time etc.

Imagining is probably the wrong word. Intense visualisation and kind of remembering the moves. Dunno if you've ever done mental rehearsal of things before sport, probably performers (musos, clowns etc) do the same thing. Like visualising a race or a kick for goal or whatever. When you get that right it feels like you are actually doing it but you aren't you are just going thru the process in your head.
 

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Has anyone tried TMS or ECT?
Without having read all the pages prior and just to answer this question, the Ex had ECT twice whilst we were together, she has struggled with severe bipolar since she was a teenager. 1st time there really was no change, if anything made her a bit more anxious. She had another round of ECT around 12 to 24 months later, and I would say it from my unqualified perspective it lessened the frequency and intensity of the manic swings. That said it really wasn't an absolute cure for her unique and larger problems at hand.

One thing that both of us found difficult post ECT was the memory loss. In the early stages of recovery post treatment her short term memory wasn't great, but it improved. However what was more permanent was she couldn't remember some things pre-treatment. For example a few months after the ECT we were cleaning up at home and she's asking me where she got certain things. One was a dress a mum had given her that Christmas which she wore quite a bit after receiving, she had no recollection of the gift at all. She was fine remembering people, birthdays etc, but a lot of other things she got frustrated with not being able to remember.
 

jimandphilbadge

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Maybe one for the Grumpy Olds thread, but has anyone got any tips for trying to get an older person help with anxiety?

Long story short a family member is going through a dispute with an old business partner, and is not handling it well at all. He's rightfully upset because he's getting screwed and bullied in all of this, but constantly dwells on it and gets super-worked up, becomes irrational when it others try and calm him down, starts rambling on "what if" scenarios that don't exist. It's clearly effecting his health and making him anxious, but the suggestion of seeing someone like a physiologist for coping mechanisms is swatted away because, well he's A Grumpy Old.

Anyone had any experience in helping the older resistant types get help?

Cheers
 

Kangaroos4eva

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Maybe one for the Grumpy Olds thread, but has anyone got any tips for trying to get an older person help with anxiety?

Long story short a family member is going through a dispute with an old business partner, and is not handling it well at all. He's rightfully upset because he's getting screwed and bullied in all of this, but constantly dwells on it and gets super-worked up, becomes irrational when it others try and calm him down, starts rambling on "what if" scenarios that don't exist. It's clearly effecting his health and making him anxious, but the suggestion of seeing someone like a physiologist for coping mechanisms is swatted away because, well he's A Grumpy Old.

Anyone had any experience in helping the older resistant types get help?

Cheers
It is hard with the stubborn older types. I am going through something somewhat similar with my step-father with his depression driving rampant alcoholism.

Getting him to talk to a family member would be a start or having a quiet word to his regular gp might force the stubborn types to open up. I had to get pushed to go to see a shrink, it is never easy.
 

Orange Peanut

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Maybe one for the Grumpy Olds thread, but has anyone got any tips for trying to get an older person help with anxiety?

Long story short a family member is going through a dispute with an old business partner, and is not handling it well at all. He's rightfully upset because he's getting screwed and bullied in all of this, but constantly dwells on it and gets super-worked up, becomes irrational when it others try and calm him down, starts rambling on "what if" scenarios that don't exist. It's clearly effecting his health and making him anxious, but the suggestion of seeing someone like a physiologist for coping mechanisms is swatted away because, well he's A Grumpy Old.

Anyone had any experience in helping the older resistant types get help?

Cheers
A little bit mate, but mine was only a contribution to a wider effort. It's hard because of the cultural walls you have to tear down.
Steering away from "analyse" and towards "experts on how the brain works" eventually wore a grumpy old bugger I know down and he is now a much more settled bloke. :thumbsu:
 

DarkPhoenix

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Thread starter #183
Went and saw a sleep specialist yesterday.

With my anxiety I've always had a side effect of debilitating fatigue and lack of motivation to be able to do things. At times it gets so bad I can't even be bothered brushing my teeth before bed because I just want to sleep.

Looking into sleep apnoea as expected, but he seems to think there's more there.

He's actually suggesting I may have a form of narcolepsy.

Didn't think it would go this far!
 

Jesslc

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Went and saw a sleep specialist yesterday.

With my anxiety I've always had a side effect of debilitating fatigue and lack of motivation to be able to do things. At times it gets so bad I can't even be bothered brushing my teeth before bed because I just want to sleep.

Looking into sleep apnoea as expected, but he seems to think there's more there.

He's actually suggesting I may have a form of narcolepsy.

Didn't think it would go this far!
I've had severe anxiety in the past and one thing that seems to be reccomended for both anxiety and sleep disorders is proper consistent exercise. It's never failed me and I've never felt anxious during or after exercise.

It doesn't have to be anything crazy but just enough to wear your body and mind out a bit. If I'm consistently exercising, I generally feel better and it keeps anxiety at a distance.

Worth a shot!
 
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I've had severe anxiety in the past and one thing that seems to be reccomended for both anxiety and sleep disorders is proper consistent exercise. It's never failed me and I've never felt anxious during or after exercise.

It doesn't have to be anything crazy but just enough to wear your body and mind out a bit. If I'm consistently exercising, I generally feel better and it keeps anxiety at a distance.

Worth a shot!
Agree with this. When I was boxing nothing else mattered. It provides a great distraction.
 

Egga

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Maybe one for the Grumpy Olds thread, but has anyone got any tips for trying to get an older person help with anxiety?

Long story short a family member is going through a dispute with an old business partner, and is not handling it well at all. He's rightfully upset because he's getting screwed and bullied in all of this, but constantly dwells on it and gets super-worked up, becomes irrational when it others try and calm him down, starts rambling on "what if" scenarios that don't exist. It's clearly effecting his health and making him anxious, but the suggestion of seeing someone like a physiologist for coping mechanisms is swatted away because, well he's A Grumpy Old.

Anyone had any experience in helping the older resistant types get help?

Cheers
Without knowing anything about your situation, one approach might be to get him to a gp to treat a related symptom (e.g. sleeplessness, headaches, stomach problems, blood pressure). The anxiety should come up as part of the conversation (especially if you sneakily brief the gp in advance ;)).

Grumpy Olds are hard because they know the best thing about being a Grumpy Old is you get to do whatever the f**** you want.

Good luck though bro:thumbsu:
 

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Ok so as flogish as it is to quote myself,I will anyway.

Every day for the past week I have put myself in the sort of environment that will cause me to have a panic attack.
Sure enough, the panic set in. For those that have never had one, remember a time where you felt so endangered that your body took over. BANG! Heart goes, nerves shoot through your body like a lightning bolt. Trembling now. Eyes darting, sizing up every human in sight. Ready to fight or run.

I'm acting weird. ****. People must have noticed. BANG! Heart goes, nerves shoot through your body like a lightning bolt. Trembling now. Eyes darting, sizing up every human in sight. Ready to fight or run.
I used to call it 'hyper consciousness' before I got diagnosed and did some research. Used to have no idea what was happening to me, and because I've always been the type to keep to myself on these matters I just assumed it happened to everyone.

Meticulous attention to the way I stand and where I put my arms (I get so nervous that I chew my fingernails to the base and then rip at the skin until I bleed which i'm fairly ashamed of but it's habitual now), panic at the whites in peoples eyes i'm seeing in my peripheral vision. I know i'm safe... but I sit there actively trying to subdue this feeling that i'm definitely not safe. And by that point the hairs are already up on the back of my neck and i'm pretty much ready to be swung at (my girlfriend can always tell because I go from being chirpy to dead silent at the drop of a hat).

I find it's not so much the episodes that bring me down, but more so that niggling thought sitting in the back of your head all day that says "you're defective and you know it". Because in my mind, if you have a security alarm and it trips when there's no intruders, then it's a broken alarm right? Fortunately the psychologist I saw pointed out that the human brain can tend to be more complex than an alarm system (crazy right).

One very important thing that he did tell me however, and is something that has stuck with me since: he explained that the happiest people he knew were people who had depression and learned to manage it. As when the mountain looks that much steeper, it's only that much more gratifying once you reach the top. He may have just said it to benefit me, but it's something that I can believe in and even look forward too. Thanks for listening guys.
 

DarkPhoenix

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Thread starter #188
I've had severe anxiety in the past and one thing that seems to be reccomended for both anxiety and sleep disorders is proper consistent exercise. It's never failed me and I've never felt anxious during or after exercise.

It doesn't have to be anything crazy but just enough to wear your body and mind out a bit. If I'm consistently exercising, I generally feel better and it keeps anxiety at a distance.

Worth a shot!
Very aware regarding the exercise treatment, my mum was recommended it as part of her depression.

However theres difficulties when it comes to me getting up and going out to exercise.

The Anxiety I have is social anxiety, means I struggle to motivate myself to go out, compound this with possible narcolepsy and its like having to walk through a giant cube of molasses just to go outside for a bit.

I hate being in the public eye and always assume people are watching me and mocking me, Look at that guy running on the side of the road! What a dickhead! Get back inside idiot!

Also I have an issue with one of my feet currently that we're attempting to treat where 2 bones are fusing together slightly, means exercise can be exceptionally painful at times.

As much as I'd love to get back into an exercise routine, at the moment it's not 100% feasible, but something I'd like to get back into in the future.
Once my finances are back in check i'd like to get into baseball again. Having not played any form of the sport (last was softball) for over a decade. Feel that the feet issues may be more manageable with burst exercise.
 
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I used to call it 'hyper consciousness' before I got diagnosed and did some research. Used to have no idea what was happening to me, and because I've always been the type to keep to myself on these matters I just assumed it happened to everyone.

Meticulous attention to the way I stand and where I put my arms (I get so nervous that I chew my fingernails to the base and then rip at the skin until I bleed which i'm fairly ashamed of but it's habitual now), panic at the whites in peoples eyes i'm seeing in my peripheral vision. I know i'm safe... but I sit there actively trying to subdue this feeling that i'm definitely not safe. And by that point the hairs are already up on the back of my neck and i'm pretty much ready to be swung at (my girlfriend can always tell because I go from being chirpy to dead silent at the drop of a hat).
I bite the inside of my cheek.


I find it's not so much the episodes that bring me down, but more so that niggling thought sitting in the back of your head all day that says "you're defective and you know it". Because in my mind, if you have a security alarm and it trips when there's no intruders, then it's a broken alarm right? Fortunately the psychologist I saw pointed out that the human brain can tend to be more complex than an alarm system (crazy right).


Yeah, coming to terms with the fact I have to live with this for the rest of my life was tough as hell. I just wanted to find a doctor/psychologist/psychiatrist that could flick the switch back.


One very important thing that he did tell me however, and is something that has stuck with me since: he explained that the happiest people he knew were people who had depression and learned to manage it. As when the mountain looks that much steeper, it's only that much more gratifying once you reach the top. He may have just said it to benefit me, but it's something that I can believe in and even look forward too. Thanks for listening guys.
I think that’s a great way of looking at it. In many ways I think my situation has helped me become a better person.

I must admit I have tried to respond to your post with something profound & insightful, as that’s what it deserves, but each time I’ve fell short. I’ve thought about it all day.

So, I spose all I can do is say thank you.
 

Marstermind

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This might answer something I always found odd. Once all the medallions were handed out, the players all jump on the stage as they always do - but not Schwatta. Look at 2:31:20


I just assumed that he couldn't fit so didn't bother. But he just hangs around behind the stage, shrugs at a trainer, and only makes a half-hearted effort when Sholly kind of encourages him. Later shots of him show him celebrating like everyone else, but at this moment he just looks like he wants to be alone and away from it all. Maybe I'm reading too much into it, but maybe it says something about his state of mind at this moment.
 

ferball

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One very important thing that he did tell me however, and is something that has stuck with me since: he explained that the happiest people he knew were people who had depression and learned to manage it. As when the mountain looks that much steeper, it's only that much more gratifying once you reach the top. He may have just said it to benefit me, but it's something that I can believe in and even look forward too. Thanks for listening guys.
There's probably something in that. Learning to control your own ... things (emotions, respobnses or whatever) for want of a better word, that make you feel out of control is a really powerful step. Takes alot of work tho and its an ongoing process sometimes its two steps forward two or three back but eventually it works out.
 

ferball

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This might answer something I always found odd. Once all the medallions were handed out, the players all jump on the stage as they always do - but not Schwatta. Look at 2:31:20


I just assumed that he couldn't fit so didn't bother. But he just hangs around behind the stage, shrugs at a trainer, and only makes a half-hearted effort when Sholly kind of encourages him. Later shots of him show him celebrating like everyone else, but at this moment he just looks like he wants to be alone and away from it all. Maybe I'm reading too much into it, but maybe it says something about his state of mind at this moment.
I think he jumps on first when carey calls everyone onto the stage and gets pushed off the back in the general celebrations.

Tho that sort of thing can make things worse. Totally accidental and incidental but it can hit you hard and seem personal, not necessarily from the people who did it, but the whole universe.

Cos it hates you.

Existence wants to isolate you from your mates, good things and everything great that's happening right then.

Its a shit feeling.
 

tazaa

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I think he jumps on first when carey calls everyone onto the stage and gets pushed off the back in the general celebrations.

Tho that sort of thing can make things worse. Totally accidental and incidental but it can hit you hard and seem personal, not necessarily from the people who did it, but the whole universe.

Cos it hates you.

Existence wants to isolate you from your mates, good things and everything great that's happening right then.

Its a shit feeling.
Way I saw it too
 
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