Current Dirty Johns - Coercive Control

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Kurve

Moderator
Dec 27, 2016
14,738
31,811
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
Coercive control is now a criminal offence in the UK carrying a prison term of up to 5 years. Eventually, we'll get it here.

If anybody has checked in to the really popular podcast DIRTY JOHN they will probably already be familiar with how insidious and dangerous it is. Worth a listen.

The line between appropriate relationship dynamics and unlawful behaviour might seem a bit blurry at times but the difference in an abusive relationship is that decisions by a dominant partner can become rules that, when broken, lead to consequences for the victim.

This list isn't exhaustive but building on the examples of the UK's Statutory Guidance, relevant behaviour of the perpetrator can include:
  • Isolating a person from their friends and family
  • Depriving them of their basic needs
  • Monitoring their time
  • Monitoring a person via online communication tools or using spyware
  • Taking control over aspects of their everyday life, such as where they can go, who they can see, what to wear and when they can sleep
  • Depriving them access to support services, such as specialist support or medical services
  • Repeatedly putting them down such as telling them they are worthless
  • Enforcing rules and activity which humiliate, degrade or dehumanise the victim
  • Forcing the victim to take part in criminal activity such as shoplifting, neglect or abuse of children to encourage self-blame and prevent disclosure to authorities
  • Financial abuse including control of finances, such as only allowing a person a punitive allowance
  • Control ability to go to school or place of study
  • Taking wages, benefits or allowances
  • Threats to hurt or kill
  • Threats to harm a child
  • Threats to reveal or publish private information (e.g. threatening to 'out' someone)
  • Threats to hurt or physically harming a family pet
  • Assault
  • Criminal damage (such as destruction of household goods)
  • Preventing a person from having access to transport or from working
  • Preventing a person from being able to attend school, college or University
  • Family 'dishonour'
  • Reputational damage
  • Disclosure of sexual orientation
  • Disclosure of HIV status or other medical condition without consent
  • Limiting access to family, friends and finances

 

Power Raid

TheBrownDog
Oct 15, 2004
71,769
62,214
West Perth
AFL Club
Port Adelaide
It's now a criminal offence in the UK carrying a prison term of up to 5 years. Eventually, we'll get it here.

If anybody has checked in to the really popular podcast DIRTY JOHN they will probably already be familiar with how insidious and dangerous it is. Worth a listen.

The line between appropriate relationship dynamics and unlawful behaviour might seem a bit blurry at times but the difference in an abusive relationship is that decisions by a dominant partner can become rules that, when broken, lead to consequences for the victim.

This list isn't exhaustive but building on the examples of the UK's Statutory Guidance, relevant behaviour of the perpetrator can include:
  • Isolating a person from their friends and family
  • Depriving them of their basic needs
  • Monitoring their time
  • Monitoring a person via online communication tools or using spyware
  • Taking control over aspects of their everyday life, such as where they can go, who they can see, what to wear and when they can sleep
  • Depriving them access to support services, such as specialist support or medical services
  • Repeatedly putting them down such as telling them they are worthless
  • Enforcing rules and activity which humiliate, degrade or dehumanise the victim
  • Forcing the victim to take part in criminal activity such as shoplifting, neglect or abuse of children to encourage self-blame and prevent disclosure to authorities
  • Financial abuse including control of finances, such as only allowing a person a punitive allowance
  • Control ability to go to school or place of study
  • Taking wages, benefits or allowances
  • Threats to hurt or kill
  • Threats to harm a child
  • Threats to reveal or publish private information (e.g. threatening to 'out' someone)
  • Threats to hurt or physically harming a family pet
  • Assault
  • Criminal damage (such as destruction of household goods)
  • Preventing a person from having access to transport or from working
  • Preventing a person from being able to attend school, college or University
  • Family 'dishonour'
  • Reputational damage
  • Disclosure of sexual orientation
  • Disclosure of HIV status or other medical condition without consent
  • Limiting access to family, friends and finances

I would go one further and have compulsory reporting obligations when identified as is with concerns of child abuse
 

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Kurve

Moderator
Dec 27, 2016
14,738
31,811
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
I would go one further and have compulsory reporting obligations when identified as is with concerns of child abuse
Agree, totally. It seems as if the message isn't getting across, compulsory reporting obligations would send a strong one.
 

Kurve

Moderator
Dec 27, 2016
14,738
31,811
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
There's some resistance to this with claims focus should be on education but criminalising the behaviour will more effectively drive the education. Or nothing changes.

The Northern Territory Government could soon criminalise coercive control abuse, as domestic violence rates climb across the Territory.

 

Kurve

Moderator
Dec 27, 2016
14,738
31,811
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
Coercive control inquiry gets underway
Of the 100-plus submissions put forward to the NSW Parliament's Joint Select Committee on Coercive Control, it is the personal stories that are most harrowing.

"Some time ago, my kind and gentle friend was brutally murdered by her husband," reads one submission.

"His final act of control was his first of physical violence. My friend had been subjected to years of what I now identify as coercive control."

Other submissions outline lived experience in painful detail.

"For three years I was subjected to predatory and derogatory acts by my then partner, the acts not only satisfied his need for control, but also had a sinister motive to shame and humiliate me."

The submissions will be examined as part of a three-day inquiry tasked with answering a suite of questions posed in a state government discussion paper around the potential introduction of coercive control legislation in NSW.

 

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