Current Disappearance of little William Tyrrell

Remove this Banner Ad

BFew

Premiership Player
Mar 5, 2017
4,932
15,791
AFL Club
West Coast

Gary Jubelin trial: William Tyrrell’s foster mum told files would be sent to ‘cold case’ room
CAROLINE OVERINGTON
FEBRUARY 13, 2020
William Tyrrell’s foster mother has told a Sydney court that the former head of homicide in NSW, Mr Scott Cook, told her that he intended to send William’s files to the “cold case” room.
“He said, yes, it’s going to unsolved. It has to go to unsolved,” she said.
In traumatising scenes this afternoon, William’s foster mum, who cannot be named, said she implored Mr Cook, who is now an assistant commissioner, not to give up on William, who has been missing more than five years.
“He was only three” when he went missing, she said.

But, she said, she was told: “You are not the only families of victims of crime.”
The foster mum, who was testifying at the trial of former lead investigator Gary Jubelin, said the conversations took place during an inquest into William’s disappearance, last March.

“It was midweek. It was the last week of a two-week period – I think the Wednesday,” she said.
“I was introduced (to Mr Cook, who was then homicide commander) and after the pleasantries, Mr Cook said to me: ‘You are not the families or victims of crime.’
“I stopped and looked at him.
“I said: ‘No, but you are the inquest of one of those victims.’
“He said: ‘William is not our only case.’
She sought to remind him: “He was three years old” and had disappeared from “a street with probably 20 houses on it … I don’t think you’ve got another case like that, and I don’t think you can just give up on it.
“He made no reply.
“I then asked him: ‘Are you planning on taking it to cold cases?’
“He said, ‘Yes, it’s going to unsolved’. He said ‘it has to go to unsolved, that’s the process.’
“He said ‘At the end of the inquest, it will go to unsolved.’
“I said ‘You can’t sent to unsolved. You can’t do it.’
“He said it’s going there.”
She said she feared the case would “sit in a box” and every six months, somebody would come along and take the lid off, and say: “Oh, nothing new.”
“He’s looking at me and he’s nodding,” she said.
“I’m thinking: I can believe you are saying this to his parents. We see ourselves as his parents, we raised him.”
She said she was also told by the new head of the investigation, Mr David Laidlaw, that there was “no handover” from Mr Jubelin.
“I was told by David Laidlaw, I don’t need to have a handover. And I’m angry,” she said....
Cook could be in a spot of bother after this evidence today in Court.
 

Log in to remove this ad.

BFew

Premiership Player
Mar 5, 2017
4,932
15,791
AFL Club
West Coast
Here’s the paper edition front page of the Daily Telegraph today with the cricket oriented lead story as opposed to the William Tyrell one that was scheduled to appear until they pulled it.

 

Kurve

Moderator
Dec 27, 2016
12,824
28,960
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
Jubelin may have done some really good work and he seems to have a lot of fans but imo there's more to the story than breaching the surveillances act. The powers in NSW police don't generally put this much pressure on 'hero' cops, they're protected.

change.org ... again.

 

FeelingThroaty

Dream Lover.
Dec 3, 2018
469
735
Perth
AFL Club
Fremantle
I have had two visions (both the same) that came to me in the mornings. I may be thinking this, I do not know. I saw a small to medium sized bushland. It was not like say a National park. It is bushland that is between Sububia. That is between two suburbs, or town areas. But I might be wrong re that. The bushland is on a hill. The hill rises (with curves) towards the morning sun. At near the top of this hill, the road curves in front of the morning sun (east) & curves to the right. Maybe two mild curves. Anyways near & a bit before the top there is a solid hard wide track to the left. No bush at the way in for 50 metres. Just dry grassland, maybe a foot high. But yes further in, yes there are trees & bush. It (the track) could have some medium to fine gravel on it near the road but the earth is rock hard. It goes in about 80 metres maybe more but I am not sure. And that was it. I may be wrong. Dreaming even. But I am not lying.
 

Kurve

Moderator
Dec 27, 2016
12,824
28,960
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
A person of interest has been questioned by detectives over William Tyrrell's disappearance before police launched a fresh search of the property where he used to live on the NSW mid-north coast.
Frank Abbott is expected to testify at the ongoing NSW inquest into the suspected abduction of three-year-old William when it resumes in March.
Abbott was questioned in late 2019 by police while he was behind bars for an unrelated conviction, a source has confirmed. He was not charged.

 

Kurve

Moderator
Dec 27, 2016
12,824
28,960
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
Its quite shocking, paedophiles tend to cluster in certain areas.

William Tyrrell: Evil is out there, too often much closer than
CAROLINE OVERINGTON Follow @overingtonc
known photo of William Tyrrell, who went missing in 2014.

There is a convicted sex offender living in a bush camp near the quiet street where your kids like to play. Do you have the right to know? Not currently.
What if there is more than one? What if there are, in fact, dozens or even hundreds of convicted sex offenders living in your neighbourhood, and what if police think that one of them may be responsible for the abduction of a small child in a Spider-Man suit, William Tyrrell? You still don’t have the right to know.

The Child Protection Register isn’t a public document. According to a report by the NSW Law Enforcement Conduct Commission, published in November last year, there are 4344 names on the list. That is an increase of 83 per cent in just 10 years.

The increase is due, in part, to children being believed more often. But the list is not in perfect shape. Police are supposed to be assisted in running the register by the courts and government departments.

In reality, police struggle to keep it up to date. Not everyone’s name gets passed on. Some names drop off when they shouldn’t.

Last year Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton announced his intention to open a national “child-sex register”, saying it would be the “toughest crackdown on pedophiles in Australia’s history”. Not everyone supports the idea. They fear a kind of vigilante justice, and that fear is probably valid.

Also, the idea that sex offenders are creepy old men seeking sexual favours by offering lollies to little kids isn’t accurate. The vast majority of sex offences are committed by someone already known to the victim (one recent study suggests 85 per cent of children who become victims of sexual assault know their offender.)

Still, even NSW police investigating William’s disappearance were appalled by how many sex offenders they would have to investigate.

They have since admitted that the Australian public would probably be “outraged” to know the extent to which sex offenders tend to congregate in certain areas.

Lawyers for the media tried during the recent trial of former NSW detective Gary Jubelin to have the figures for certain parts of NSW made public, arguing that there is “clear public interest” in knowing how prevalent child abuse is in certain areas.


The application was refused.

That said, we know that some — not all, but some — senior police investigating William’s disappearance very quickly formed the view that he may have been abducted by a local pedophile or pedophile ring.

A close study of the notes taken by police on the morning of William’s disappearance — September 12, 2014 — clearly show their concern. One of the first things that the first police officer on the scene, Senior Constable Christopher Rowley, who arrived just nine minutes after the triple-0 call, did was make sure the local Child Protection Register was checked.

Nobody who lived on Benaroon Drive in Kendall, where William had last been seen playing, was on it, but in the local area?

Police at one point had more than 600 names on their list. And so began the painstaking strategy known as “rounding up the usual suspects” — tracking down local men with a deviant interest in children who happened to be around that day.

Obviously this isn’t a hi-tech method but when it comes to policing, the old strategies are often the best. Take the case of Brisbane boy Daniel Morcombe, who disappeared from a bus stop in 2003. In “rounding up the usual suspects”, police happened upon local sex offender Brett Cowan, who admitted he had driven past the bus stop that day. It took police 13 years to get him for Daniel’s murder but get him they did.

In William’s case, police went knocking on the doors of old caravans parked deep in the forest, near where he’d been playing. They poked their heads into tents and humpies.

One of Tasmania’s pedophile priests, Derek Edward Nichols, who at the time of William’s disappearance was in his late 70s, used to live a short walk from William’s foster nana’s house in Kendall. He also used to sing in a local choir, having trained in both choir music and the pipe organ.

Nichols had been convicted of indecently assaulting a 12-year-old boy in Tasmania in 1987. Twenty years later he was also found guilty of possessing child pornography. He was one of the first suspects interviewed by detectives investigating the disappearance of William.

“I was living in Kendall and the police came to see me because I was on the Child Protection Register,” he said.

They searched his house and took a statement. No evidence could be found to link him to the crime, so detectives moved to the next name on the list.

Frank Abbott, aged 78, is serving time in a NSW prison for a string of assaults against young boys. He is another of the people rounded up as a possible suspect during the Tyrrell investigation.

Strike force detectives have twice ordered a search of the area where he used to live. They brought in cadaver dogs and an excavator and turned a woodpile into chips. Nothing related to William was found.

At the same time detectives from the sex crimes unit were examining child abuse material, much of which is these days found online. It’s not uncommon for pedophiles to communicate using little motifs, or symbols. It could be something innocent like a picture of a child on a man’s lap holding a pink rubber duck. The duck is the clue. To those who operate on the dark web, these symbols are used by men to alert each other to their preferences.

Strike force detectives were forced during the glummest days of the investigation to infiltrate pedophile networks. They went undercover.

Some had to watch thousands of child-abuse videos and view photographs hoping — dreading — that they might find William on the dark web, or else on a USB that had been passed to them in a carpark by somebody who trusted them to be of the same inclination.

They did it because finding William was the most important assignment of their lives, and also the hardest. Some broke down and some will never work again. None will ever look at the world in the same way.

They also looked closely at the list of people who turned up to search for William on the day he disappeared.

Why? Well, anyone who has volunteered at a bushfire — not fighting fires, necessarily, but working the coffee urn or even sorting through the many items that get donated — will know the protocol.

You turn up, ready to help, and they make you register.

There are several reasons: safety is the main one. It is also because the culprit — in the case of arson, the fire bug — will sometimes return to the scene of the crime to admire their handiwork.

It is the same with crime. The perpetrator will sometimes drive past the crime tape and the media pack (in the case of murder, they often return to the burial site).

One name stood out: the man in question was a member of the SES from Taree. He had arrived in a truck with other members of his crew about 4pm on the day of William’s disappearance. He had a job at a local service station, about 10 minutes from Benaroon Drive. He drove a small white van, and William’s foster mother had told police she had seen a small white station wagon parked in the street an hour or so before he disappeared.

He had been known to park his van near the Kendall tennis courts or the Kendall showgrounds between his shifts at the local service station, to sleep in it overnight. And he was a registered sex offender.

Detectives wondered: could this be a lead?

This is an edited extract from Finding William Tyrrell by Caroline Overington (HarperCollins), out now.
 

FeelingThroaty

Dream Lover.
Dec 3, 2018
469
735
Perth
AFL Club
Fremantle
Its quite shocking, paedophiles tend to cluster in certain areas.

William Tyrrell: Evil is out there, too often much closer than
CAROLINE OVERINGTON Follow @overingtonc
known photo of William Tyrrell, who went missing in 2014.

There is a convicted sex offender living in a bush camp near the quiet street where your kids like to play. Do you have the right to know? Not currently.
What if there is more than one? What if there are, in fact, dozens or even hundreds of convicted sex offenders living in your neighbourhood, and what if police think that one of them may be responsible for the abduction of a small child in a Spider-Man suit, William Tyrrell? You still don’t have the right to know.

The Child Protection Register isn’t a public document. According to a report by the NSW Law Enforcement Conduct Commission, published in November last year, there are 4344 names on the list. That is an increase of 83 per cent in just 10 years.

The increase is due, in part, to children being believed more often. But the list is not in perfect shape. Police are supposed to be assisted in running the register by the courts and government departments.

In reality, police struggle to keep it up to date. Not everyone’s name gets passed on. Some names drop off when they shouldn’t.

Last year Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton announced his intention to open a national “child-sex register”, saying it would be the “toughest crackdown on pedophiles in Australia’s history”. Not everyone supports the idea. They fear a kind of vigilante justice, and that fear is probably valid.

Also, the idea that sex offenders are creepy old men seeking sexual favours by offering lollies to little kids isn’t accurate. The vast majority of sex offences are committed by someone already known to the victim (one recent study suggests 85 per cent of children who become victims of sexual assault know their offender.)

Still, even NSW police investigating William’s disappearance were appalled by how many sex offenders they would have to investigate.

They have since admitted that the Australian public would probably be “outraged” to know the extent to which sex offenders tend to congregate in certain areas.

Lawyers for the media tried during the recent trial of former NSW detective Gary Jubelin to have the figures for certain parts of NSW made public, arguing that there is “clear public interest” in knowing how prevalent child abuse is in certain areas.


The application was refused.

That said, we know that some — not all, but some — senior police investigating William’s disappearance very quickly formed the view that he may have been abducted by a local pedophile or pedophile ring.

A close study of the notes taken by police on the morning of William’s disappearance — September 12, 2014 — clearly show their concern. One of the first things that the first police officer on the scene, Senior Constable Christopher Rowley, who arrived just nine minutes after the triple-0 call, did was make sure the local Child Protection Register was checked.

Nobody who lived on Benaroon Drive in Kendall, where William had last been seen playing, was on it, but in the local area?

Police at one point had more than 600 names on their list. And so began the painstaking strategy known as “rounding up the usual suspects” — tracking down local men with a deviant interest in children who happened to be around that day.

Obviously this isn’t a hi-tech method but when it comes to policing, the old strategies are often the best. Take the case of Brisbane boy Daniel Morcombe, who disappeared from a bus stop in 2003. In “rounding up the usual suspects”, police happened upon local sex offender Brett Cowan, who admitted he had driven past the bus stop that day. It took police 13 years to get him for Daniel’s murder but get him they did.

In William’s case, police went knocking on the doors of old caravans parked deep in the forest, near where he’d been playing. They poked their heads into tents and humpies.

One of Tasmania’s pedophile priests, Derek Edward Nichols, who at the time of William’s disappearance was in his late 70s, used to live a short walk from William’s foster nana’s house in Kendall. He also used to sing in a local choir, having trained in both choir music and the pipe organ.

Nichols had been convicted of indecently assaulting a 12-year-old boy in Tasmania in 1987. Twenty years later he was also found guilty of possessing child pornography. He was one of the first suspects interviewed by detectives investigating the disappearance of William.

“I was living in Kendall and the police came to see me because I was on the Child Protection Register,” he said.

They searched his house and took a statement. No evidence could be found to link him to the crime, so detectives moved to the next name on the list.

Frank Abbott, aged 78, is serving time in a NSW prison for a string of assaults against young boys. He is another of the people rounded up as a possible suspect during the Tyrrell investigation.

Strike force detectives have twice ordered a search of the area where he used to live. They brought in cadaver dogs and an excavator and turned a woodpile into chips. Nothing related to William was found.

At the same time detectives from the sex crimes unit were examining child abuse material, much of which is these days found online. It’s not uncommon for pedophiles to communicate using little motifs, or symbols. It could be something innocent like a picture of a child on a man’s lap holding a pink rubber duck. The duck is the clue. To those who operate on the dark web, these symbols are used by men to alert each other to their preferences.

Strike force detectives were forced during the glummest days of the investigation to infiltrate pedophile networks. They went undercover.

Some had to watch thousands of child-abuse videos and view photographs hoping — dreading — that they might find William on the dark web, or else on a USB that had been passed to them in a carpark by somebody who trusted them to be of the same inclination.

They did it because finding William was the most important assignment of their lives, and also the hardest. Some broke down and some will never work again. None will ever look at the world in the same way.

They also looked closely at the list of people who turned up to search for William on the day he disappeared.

Why? Well, anyone who has volunteered at a bushfire — not fighting fires, necessarily, but working the coffee urn or even sorting through the many items that get donated — will know the protocol.

You turn up, ready to help, and they make you register.

There are several reasons: safety is the main one. It is also because the culprit — in the case of arson, the fire bug — will sometimes return to the scene of the crime to admire their handiwork.

It is the same with crime. The perpetrator will sometimes drive past the crime tape and the media pack (in the case of murder, they often return to the burial site).

One name stood out: the man in question was a member of the SES from Taree. He had arrived in a truck with other members of his crew about 4pm on the day of William’s disappearance. He had a job at a local service station, about 10 minutes from Benaroon Drive. He drove a small white van, and William’s foster mother had told police she had seen a small white station wagon parked in the street an hour or so before he disappeared.

He had been known to park his van near the Kendall tennis courts or the Kendall showgrounds between his shifts at the local service station, to sleep in it overnight. And he was a registered sex offender.

Detectives wondered: could this be a lead?


This is an edited extract from Finding William Tyrrell by Caroline Overington (HarperCollins), out now.
OMG WOW !! Thanks Shelly G.
 

FeelingThroaty

Dream Lover.
Dec 3, 2018
469
735
Perth
AFL Club
Fremantle
OMG WOW !! Thanks Shelly G.
I have a strong hate for pedos. Do what you want in life, but leave kids alone. They will take their own path in life. Another hate is scum who take their kids, wife with them when they top. If you are not happy, then fine, see ya later. But do not complicate your future lifetimes with what you have taken in your present life. I am actually more balanced than what most people believe. I blogged to bring BRE (Claremont case) out yet he hardly spoke. I still believe I am close to the first victim. I really do. Cause I read up on helping clues someone posted, and I am not lying. They did not do it. But they have given clues. BIG ONES. Don't ask in a PM. I will not answer. But getting back to William. If I am supposed to be guided there I will. It will not be of my doing should I go there. Hoping time & dollars permit.
 

(Log in to remove this ad.)

Kurve

Moderator
Dec 27, 2016
12,824
28,960
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
A convicted pedophile from the NSW mid-north coast has been invited to observe the William Tyrrell inquest from a heavy-bricked cell at the Cessnock jail.
Frank Abbott, 79, a sex offender currently serving 16 years for abusing young boys, spent Monday watching proceedings on CCTV.

He asked two questions of witnesses but is not expected to give his own testimony until next week.

Mr Abbott was living rough in a caravan in the bush near the house William disappeared from, in 2014.

Police have twice searched the site, turning an old wood pile into chips during one of those searches. Cadaver dogs have also been over the area.

The most recent search was just two weeks ago.

 

Kurve

Moderator
Dec 27, 2016
12,824
28,960
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
‘I didn’t do it … the police messed it all up’

CAROLINE OVERINGTON

ASSOCIATE EDITOR
@overingtonc
  • 14 MINUTES AGO MARCH 9, 2020
An elderly widower from the mid-north coast NSW village of Kendall has accused police of trying to “stitch him up” for the disappearance of William Tyrrell, and in the process allowing the real kidnapper to “get away”.
“They messed the whole thing up,” said Paul Savage, 75, who lives opposite the house where William disappeared in September 2014.

“They went after (local white goods repairman) Bill Spedding and when they realised it wasn’t him, they came after me,” he said.

“They want to get somebody. It’s mostly (former homicide detective) Gary (Jubelin) who was telling people I must have done it, but that’s over now. They’re finished with me. I’m happy about that. I had nothing to do with it.”

Mr Savage was speaking to The Australian outside his home on Sunday, just a day ahead of the resumption of the coronial inquiry into William’s disappearance.

The inquiry, headed by NSW deputy coroner Harriet Grahame, began last March but has been plagued by long delays, adjournments and equipment failure.

It returns to Taree on Monday, with evidence expected from a possible witness to William’s disappearance, and from relatives of one of the mid-north coast’s well-known paedophiles.

Mr Savage said he did not expect to be called back to the inquest, having already testified.

“They’ve finished with me,” he said. “I’m not on their list of people any more. That’s what they told me the last time I saw them. If I can help them, I will go, but I’ve told them everything already.”

He said Mr Jubelin had accused him of taking William, “because they mucked it up from day one, and had nobody. All I did was help look for him. He made it sound like I was somebody who was hiding the truth. I always told the truth.”

Mr Jubelin was charged last year with four breaches of the Surveillance Devices Act, after an internal probe found he had recorded four conversations with Mr Savage, 75, on his mobile phone, without the proper warrant being in place. He quit the force, and faced court in February. A decision is expected on April 7.

Mr Jubelin has pleaded not guilty, saying he had an “operational need” to record all four conversations. He explained for the court Mr Savage was under police surveillance at the time. Listening devices had lawfully been installed in his house and car, and on his mobile phone and his landline.

Mr Jubelin told the court he used his own phone as a “back-up” recording device because the police listening devices often failed, and because he was concerned that Mr Savage would accuse him of bullying or intimidation.

Mr Savage told the court that Mr Jubelin had threatened to arrest him for the crime. However, the tape of the conversation captured no such threat.

“You’ve got a little fella missing and they want to get somebody, but I had nothing to do with it,” Mr Savage said on Sunday.

He has no history of crimes against children, or indeed against anyone. He pleaded guilty to breaching an AVO in 2014, after a local “post lady” complained that he was making her uncomfortable by telling her he loved her.

Mr Savage was at home on the morning of William’s disappearance. His late wife Heather had gone to bingo. He came to the door when a neighbour knocked, and when he heard that a “little fella” was missing he headed straight up a local fire trail. He told police he got lost and was gone about two hours. Mr Jubelin questioned Mr Savage about whether he, or his wife, had run William over.

Mr Savage’s adult children are furious about the number of times he has been questioned by police, especially without a lawyer being present.

William has not been seen since about 10.30am on Friday September 12, 2014. Aged 3, he was in the care of his foster mother, and her mother, when he went missing from the front garden.
 

Kurve

Moderator
Dec 27, 2016
12,824
28,960
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
This doesn't read like something children would make up.

A woman has told an inquest that a convicted paedophile told two young boys that he killed William Tyrrell and buried him in a suitcase.

Key points:

  • The boy made the allegation to a babysitter, as they were listening to William's song, Bring Him Home
  • She told her mother who then reported it to Crime Stoppers and later gave police statements
  • No one has ever been charged in relation to William's disappearance and suspected murder


Frank Abbott is a person of interest in the disappearance of the three-year-old, who has not been seen since he vanished from Kendall on the NSW Mid North Coast in September 2014.

The woman, who cannot be named for legal reasons, told the court she was looking after two brothers for the first time when the younger boy made a disturbing allegation against Abbott.

"He said, 'I know who killed William'," the woman told Taree Court.

The babysitter said the boy told her Abbott killed William and buried him in a suitcase and that the toddler "was dead, but they hadn't seen the body".

She said the allegation came while all three were playing in a room and listening to William's song — Bring Him Home — which is from the musical, Les Miserables.

She said the older brother had then tried to silence the younger boy because he was scared.


 

Remove this Banner Ad