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Truckosaurus

Brownlow Medallist
Oct 19, 2009
10,775
25,100
Perth
AFL Club
West Coast
Getting a bit off topic, but I suspect that religious organisations (namely the Southern Baptists and affiliates) probably played a large role in getting Prohibition passed. The sorts that have convinced themselves that all the references to wine in the Bible actually mean non-alcoholic grape juice.
 

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jason_recliner

All Australian
Dec 9, 2020
632
845
AFL Club
West Coast
How has it protected you, if I may ask? Do you have it locked up?
I don't have a pistol yet. Started the training many years ago but unfortunate personal circumstances forced my funds to be directed elsewhere (handgun ownership is not cheap). It's still on my list of things to do.
 

Kurve

Moderator
Dec 27, 2016
19,337
43,193
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
People want to know why it took the cops an hour to enter the school to neutralise the shooter with the Chief admitting it was wrong and the answer looking like it was because they were scared. Too scared to serve and protect, they can't do their jobs up against a teenager with a legal AR-15 style weapon.

 

Spearman

Premiership Player
Sep 15, 2017
3,492
5,362
expatriated in East Asia
AFL Club
Geelong
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Ohio State Buckeyes
Getting a bit off topic, but I suspect that religious organisations (namely the Southern Baptists and affiliates) probably played a large role in getting Prohibition passed. The sorts that have convinced themselves that all the references to wine in the Bible actually mean non-alcoholic grape juice.
There was but not as much as you might believe. I won't post on it anymore either.
But if you can find a way to watch Ken Burns' documentary Prohibition you learn a lot. I know I did. Some interesting parallels with current US politics, as well.
 

Spearman

Premiership Player
Sep 15, 2017
3,492
5,362
expatriated in East Asia
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The NRA is the root of a lot of the evil in lack of control in the US. They started out as a gun safety org, but morphed into a purely political cult. I can't believe that LaPierre and the org survived that corruption scandal.
A couple GOP governor went against them and were hounded hard by the org afterward. They and their buddies the gun manufacturers are who pay the congresscritters to block anything that could curtail any gun purchase and use. There is no reason in their policies.
 

Kurve

Moderator
Dec 27, 2016
19,337
43,193
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
"So if we are able to reduce the number of AR-15s available, in favour of the 9mmm handguns, we'll be able to identify the children's bodies much easier at the next school shooting."

Meh ... they have to start somewhere.
 

NonPhixion

Bookie Assassin
Mar 27, 2018
6,495
13,139
AFL Club
Collingwood
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Cleveland Browns, Tony Ferguson
"So if we are able to reduce the number of AR-15s available, in favour of the 9mmm handguns, we'll be able to identify the children's bodies much easier at the next school shooting."
I can see justification in owning a handgun for self-defence. But assault rifles have no place outside of the army. The only exception I can see is if you live in a remote region where predators like bears are a genuine threat.
 

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Dogs_R_Us

Space Traveller
May 3, 2001
22,630
24,652
Sirius - the Dogstar
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
I get that Americans LOVE LOVE LOVE their guns - but I don't get why. Legally they can't be used for anything except hunting, and a great many gun owners don't hunt. So how do they get to use these beloved possessions (apart from suicide and accidents)? What justifies their place in households that are never under threat and likely never will be? And if in the unlikely event that an innocent household is broken into, how long will it take the owner to find the key, get out the gun, load it, and... Or is America a far more dangerous place than even the rest of the world thinks it is?
 

jason_recliner

All Australian
Dec 9, 2020
632
845
AFL Club
West Coast
I get that Americans LOVE LOVE LOVE their guns - but I don't get why. Legally they can't be used for anything except hunting, and a great many gun owners don't hunt. So how do they get to use these beloved possessions (apart from suicide and accidents)? What justifies their place in households that are never under threat and likely never will be? And if in the unlikely event that an innocent household is broken into, how long will it take the owner to find the key, get out the gun, load it, and... Or is America a far more dangerous place than even the rest of the world thinks it is?
The can be used for hunting and sport shooting. They can also be carried for self defence in many states. I don't know the requirements to store them at home but certainly some Americans I know have stated they would be able to use them during a home invasion (no idea of the truth/legality to that). Finally, they are often well-engineered extremely high quality mechanical items that are in and of themselves desirable and collectable to some.
 

bungalow_bill

Norm Smith Medallist
Dec 11, 2010
8,925
9,794
AFL Club
Brisbane Lions
The can be used for hunting and sport shooting. They can also be carried for self defence in many states. I don't know the requirements to store them at home but certainly some Americans I know have stated they would be able to use them during a home invasion (no idea of the truth/legality to that). Finally, they are often well-engineered extremely high quality mechanical items that are in and of themselves desirable and collectable to some.

Highly unlikely all of them are kept under lock and key. Most gun owners probably have an easily accessible unloaded gun and separate magazine/ammo. A home invasion can come out of nowhere so you would need to be able to access it in an instant.
 

Spearman

Premiership Player
Sep 15, 2017
3,492
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expatriated in East Asia
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the non-hunting owners that I know have them either for home defense or they just like shooting at targets. The latter is something like as a boy shooting bb guns at stuff out in the fields and woods, throwing darts, shooting arrows or any anything that involves a target. I once was gifted a session of skeet shooting. It was fun. Myself, that's why I'd have them, and they'd be most likely historical models. As it is, I got a small collection of guitars going. I don't play particularly well, I guess. But they look and feel cool. I agree with the comment above about their aesthetic charms.
If you liked playing with fireworks or firecrackers, you'd understand a little about it as well. Blowin' s**t up is fun. That what guys do with their AKs, take them out to ranges or really rural open areas, and shoot the crap out whatever.
It's all very early teen boy sort of stuff.
 

zedx

Club Legend
Feb 23, 2019
1,134
3,821
AFL Club
Fremantle
Highly unlikely all of them are kept under lock and key. Most gun owners probably have an easily accessible unloaded gun and separate magazine/ammo. A home invasion can come out of nowhere so you would need to be able to access it in an instant.
Do they even have to legally have their guns in USA locked away as we do in Australia?
 

Dogs_R_Us

Space Traveller
May 3, 2001
22,630
24,652
Sirius - the Dogstar
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
Ok well, the thinking is foreign to me and I’m thankful Australia isn’t like that. Whenever these things happen I try to imagine what it would be like if it happened here. Even the tv commentators over there seem less shocked than accepting of another multiple shooting.
 

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