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grumbleguts

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Aug 14, 2011
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'chemtrails' have been there ever since jet travel. I remeber them in england (on a clear day) we dont get them here much, probably cos its actually just water vapour and australia is a dry place
The water vapour comes from the burning of the fuel. All hydrocarbons react with oxygen and form water and CO2, the water is the vapour trail you see. We see it here just as much, but the plane has to be high enough for the water to cool quickly enough to form the familiar trail. Typically in cities you don't see that because they are circling the airport.
 

Pessimistic

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The water vapour comes from the burning of the fuel. All hydrocarbons react with oxygen and form water and CO2, the water is the vapour trail you see. We see it here just as much, but the plane has to be high enough for the water to cool quickly enough to form the familiar trail. Typically in cities you don't see that because they are circling the airport.
Contrails (/ˈkɒntreɪlz/; short for "condensation trails") or vapour trails are line-shaped clouds produced by aircraft engine exhaust or changes in air pressure, typically at aircraft cruising altitudes several miles above the Earth's surface. Contrails are composed primarily of water, in the form of ice crystals. The combination of water vapor in aircraft engine exhaust and the low ambient temperatures that exist at high altitudes allows the formation of the trails. Impurities in the engine exhaust from the fuel, including sulfur compounds (0.05% by weight in jet fuel) provide some of the particles that can serve as sites for water droplet growth in the exhaust and, if water droplets form, they might freeze to form ice particles that compose a contrail.[1] Their formation can also be triggered by changes in air pressure in wingtip vortices or in the air over the entire wing surface.[2] Contrails, and other clouds directly resulting from human activity, are collectively named homogenitus.[3]

Depending on the temperature and humidity at the altitude the contrails form, they may be visible for only a few seconds or minutes, or may persist for hours and spread to be several miles wide, eventually resembling natural cirrus or altocumulus clouds.[1] Persistent contrails are of particular interest to scientists because they increase the cloudiness of the atmosphere.[1] The resulting cloud forms are formally described as homomutatus,[3] and may resemble cirrus, cirrocumulus, or cirrostratus, and are sometimes called cirrus aviaticus.[4] Persistent spreading contrails are suspected to have an effect on global climate.[5][6]

But Yes, altitude is a factor
 

grumbleguts

Brownlow Medallist
Aug 14, 2011
10,219
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Tully FNQ
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Contrails (/ˈkɒntreɪlz/; short for "condensation trails") or vapour trails are line-shaped clouds produced by aircraft engine exhaust or changes in air pressure, typically at aircraft cruising altitudes several miles above the Earth's surface. Contrails are composed primarily of water, in the form of ice crystals. The combination of water vapor in aircraft engine exhaust and the low ambient temperatures that exist at high altitudes allows the formation of the trails. Impurities in the engine exhaust from the fuel, including sulfur compounds (0.05% by weight in jet fuel) provide some of the particles that can serve as sites for water droplet growth in the exhaust and, if water droplets form, they might freeze to form ice particles that compose a contrail.[1] Their formation can also be triggered by changes in air pressure in wingtip vortices or in the air over the entire wing surface.[2] Contrails, and other clouds directly resulting from human activity, are collectively named homogenitus.[3]

Depending on the temperature and humidity at the altitude the contrails form, they may be visible for only a few seconds or minutes, or may persist for hours and spread to be several miles wide, eventually resembling natural cirrus or altocumulus clouds.[1] Persistent contrails are of particular interest to scientists because they increase the cloudiness of the atmosphere.[1] The resulting cloud forms are formally described as homomutatus,[3] and may resemble cirrus, cirrocumulus, or cirrostratus, and are sometimes called cirrus aviaticus.[4] Persistent spreading contrails are suspected to have an effect on global climate.[5][6]

But Yes, altitude is a factor
All of that is exactly what I said.
 

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H00t

Team Captain
Sep 28, 2019
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You do realize that you’re in Australia, yeah?
Unfortunately we have sky news here, which is pretty much as bad as Fox News. Except it can still be called news as fox is “news entertainment”.

After a court case where Foxes own lawyers successfully argued Fox News was full of so much rubbish that no one watching it could believe it was true because of how unhinged it is.
 

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