News Giants in the Media

Isaac Cumming No 1

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SA club licences have been bought back and now follow the standard model.



Member owned, like the Victorian clubs.
Tks

I wonder if the report was about a potential sponsor and just got distorted. I can see the club discussing that with anyone but not ownership being on the table.

I can't find anything on SEN but I know the poster and expect he's genuine. Must have been radio discussion only I think.
 

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Pres

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There was an interview tonight with Adam Kennedy on SEN. Can't find a link and it was not extra memorable.

He did mention that Tommy Sheridan was being earmarked to take up Scull's vacant wing spot and that he considered Cal Ward the best kick at the club (which I found interesting).

Also thought Daniel Lloyd was the best set shot in the side.
 

Determinant

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More in the link
https://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/afl/teams/gws/eight-reasons-why-gws-is-still-a-premiership-contender/news-story/5253454d8ccbc9aaedefb8a2dad1cb4e


Eight reasons why GWS is still a premiership contender
Chris Cavanagh, Herald Sun
December 30, 2018 4:00pm
Subscriber only
For all the talent on its list, ultimate success has eluded Greater Western Sydney with two preliminary final and semi-final appearances over the past three season.

But have the Giants missed their chance or is their premiership window still wide open?


EIGHT REASONS WHY GWS CAN GET EXCITED
1. MORE GREENE

At the start of last season, leading football analyst David King rated Toby Greene as the Giants’ best and most important player. The forward went on to play just nine games in 2018 as foot and ankle complaints continued throughout the season. As a result, the 25-year-old kicked just 16 goals for the year after totals of 45 and 44 majors the previous two seasons. Greene also recorded only six goal assists, having contributed 28 in 2016. At his best Greene is a matchwinner with more X-factor than almost anyone else in the competition and GWS will be hoping he can stay fit in and rediscover top form in 2019.
2. NEXT STEP

The Giants haven’t exactly been far off the mark of the top sides in the competition the past three years. They lost a preliminary final by six points to eventual premier Western Bulldogs in 2016, lost another preliminary final to eventual premier Richmond in 2017 and fell short of grand finalist Collingwood by 10 points in a semi-final in 2018. For a largely young and developing side, that finals experience would have been invaluable. Now it’s time to shine.

3. BIG PATTON

GWS was hit hard by injuries in 2018 and the one to Jonathon Patton was as big as any. The key forward tore his ACL at training after playing just 12 games during what was a disappointing first half of the season by his standards. Patton managed just 10 goals from his 12 games but is capable of much more. In 2016, he kicked 38 goals from 23 games and in 2017 he booted 45 goals from 22 games. The Giants won’t be rushing the 2011 No. 1 draft pick back from what is a third knee reconstruction but they will be hoping he can get back on the park and return to form. Their forward line looks significantly better when Patton is up and about.
4. EXPLODING WITH TALENT

As an expansion side who debuted in only 2012, the Giants were handed plenty of draft concessions and therefore have an extraordinary amount of talent on their list. In fact, close to half of the GWS list — a total of 19 players — were first-round draft picks at some point. Three of those arrived through the door at the 2018 national draft in Jye Caldwell (pick 11), Jackson Hately (pick 14) and Xavier O’Halloran (pick 22), further bolstering the incredible talent at the disposal of coach Leon Cameron. Talent alone doesn’t win you premierships, but it certainly helps.

5. POWER MIDFIELD

The on ball brigade is undoubtedly the Giants’ biggest strength and should again cause plenty of opposition headaches in 2019, despite the departure of Dylan Shiel to Essendon. Champion Data ranks the GWS midfield the fifth-most talented in the competition, however the side ranked No. 1 for clearances and hard ball gets and No.5 for inside-50s last season. The No.2 draft pick from 2016, Tim Taranto, should only get better in his third season and the Giants will be hoping for more football out of Josh Kelly, who was restricted to 16 games by injury. Add to them Callan Ward, Stephen Coniglio, Adam Tomlinson and Jacob Hopper and you have a very solid line-up.
6. SUNNY FIXTURE

The Giants’ 2019 fixture is not the easiest going around by any stretch, Champion Data ranking it the ninth-hardest of any side. However, they have drawn struggling Gold Coast Suns twice, in Rounds 11 and 23. GWS played Gold Coast only once in 2018, scoring a whopping 108-point win in Round 12. The chance to play the Suns twice could help their percentage significantly, which is often a big factor in final placings at the end of the season given how close the competition has been in recent years.

7. ZAC BACK

Versatile defender Zac Williams was largely a forgotten name in the football world last year, but there is no understating his importance to the Giants. A ruptured achilles ruled Williams out of the entire home-and-away season in 2018 before he finally returned for the club’s two finals matches. The 24-year-old finished sixth in the Giants’ best-and-fairest count in 2017, averaging 22.2 disposals and almost four tackles. Williams can lock down on dangerous opposition small forwards as well as win his own ball and shapes as one of the biggest “recruits” in the competition next season.
8. MUMMY RETURNS

Ruckman Shane Mumford announced his retirement due to an ongoing foot problem at the end of 2017 but in the shock story of the off-season — he’s back. The 32-year-old continued at the Giants as a ruck coach last season and hit foot injury gradually improved to a point where the club decided he was worth relisting as a realistic chance of playing again in 2019. Mumford played 21 games in 2017, averaging 39.2 hit-outs, 5.6 tackles and more than 10 disposals a game. If he can stay fit, the big man could have a big impact returning next season.

WHAT CHAMPION DATA SAYS: The Giants have seventh-rated list heading into 2019 — their lowest ranking since 2015. Their midfield still rates fifth despite losing Tom Scully and Dylan Shiel, with Callan Ward ranked as the sixth-best midfielder in the league.

TRAJECTORY

2014: 16th (6-16)

2015: 11th (11-11)

2016: 4th (16-6, preliminary final)

2017: 4th (14-2-6, preliminary final)

2018: 7th (13-1-8, semi-final)

TAB ODDS

Premiership: $15

Top-8: $1.70

Most losses: $101
 

Giant Strides

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https://www.afl.com.au/news/2019-01-17/he-could-be-anything-skippers-big-call-on-young-giant

TIM TARANTO doesn't explode from stoppages like Dylan Shiel or carry the footy like Tom Scully, nor does he share the profile of his now former Greater Western Sydney teammates. However, if the glowing endorsement he's received from his co-captain Callan Ward is anything to go by, expect big things from the young star in 2019. The exit of Shiel to Essendon and Scully to Hawthorn during last year's NAB AFL Trade Period left a massive hole in the Giants' midfield, but Ward nominated Taranto and fellow onballer Jacob Hopper as the players set to emerge from their shadows.

After a serious ankle injury hindered him in his debut season, Taranto, who was taken at No.2 in the 2016 NAB AFL Draft, played 23 games last year to establish himself as one of the competition's brightest prospects. Taranto was ranked first at GWS for tackles, equal third with Shiel for contested possessions, fourth for clearances and fifth for possessions. Ward told AFL.com.au that Taranto was poised to enhance his reputation even further this season. "Timmy is a guy I rate so highly, I think he could be anything," Ward said. "I always tell him he's the perfect build for an AFL player because he's got the height, he's strong and he can run, he's got it all.

(2018 stats)
Tim Taranto.PNG


more in the story, see link above
 

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fridgeman

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Isaac Cumming No 1

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Saw Dangerfield trash talking Lachie Whitfield and the Giants defence at the stoopid AFLX draft. Would love to wipe that smug smile off his face with a win at Geelong this year.
Dont think I'd take it too much to heart. Phil Davis and Dangerfiekd are close friends from their Crows days. Phil was best man at his wedding and spent a weekend with his family after the Geelong game last year.

Nothing I'd like more than kicking some Cat butt at their place this year though.
 

General Giant

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Mongrel Punt is hit and miss but it's not all bad.

Just some quick thoughts....

https://themongrelpunt.com/afl/2019/02/10/begiant1

ON-FIELD (FAIL)

GWS’ entire list management strategy since they joined the AFL in 2012 was to challenge – and win – a premiership by 2017-2018. That was how they built their inaugural list which consisted of the best young players in the country mixed in with some crucial experienced players such as Chad Cornes, Luke Power, James MacDonald and Dean Brogan. Clearly the team once touted to be the most talented ever assembled, expected to have a premiership already in the bank. This is evident by how GWS structured their playing contracts and salary cap which led to the recent off-field exodus, headlined by the departures of Dylan Shiel, Tom Scully and Rory Lobb.
The years of pain that saw consecutive wooden spoons was supposed to be offset by a flag. However, despite coming close in the back-to-back preliminary final defeats of 2016 and 2017, GWS have failed to qualify for a Grand Final. Thus, their on-field performances must be marked as a failure to date.


- Hmmm I wouldnt say a fail.

Every man and his dog was telling us our players would jump ship the moment they had an opportunity.
Hense why the Suns and our concessions were the biggest in the history of starting up a team.
To get them to stay (the majority ) and to make consecutive finals is an achievement, but with the talent on board we should of made at least 1 Grand Final (2016 and 2018 hurt).

SELECTION OF CAPTAINS (PASS)

This week Giants co-captains Callan Ward and Phil Davis were renewed as joint skippers for 2019, highlighting the remarkable success of their tenure. Ward and Davis will lead the squad for their eighth consecutive year, not only solidifying their standing as the AFL’s longest standing club captains, but as two of the most respected figures in the game. Originally alongside triple premiership Lion Luke Power, the captaincy decision of 2012 was a masterstroke that has stood the test of time.


- No argument from me.


SELECTION OF COACHES (PASS)

GWS elected their coaches just as wisely as their captains from day one. Not only did the club have co-captains in their early years but the inaugural squad effectively had co-coaches in the official coach Kevin Sheedy and the unofficial coach Mark “Choco” Williams. Coaching legend, Kevin Sheedy, who notched up his 1,000th VFL/AFL sanctioned game in his time at the Giants, now has the club’s best and fairest named in his honour, such is the impact the man dubbed “the father of the Giants,” had on the formative years of the football club. Sheedy, an inspirational motivator, instilled the young Giants with a sense of identity and passion, as well as doubling up as the game’s greatest promoter making a remarkable contribution to the game’s growth in New South Wales.
In between spruiking the good word of the game and his stirring pre-game speeches, former Port Adelaide premiership coach Mark Williams did most of the “hands on” coaching and was a brilliant addition. Finally, the Kevin Sheedy-Leon Cameron coaching succession plan has been a smooth and successful transition. Despite the fact there has been no flags to show for it, the club has qualified for finals three times in his five-year reign.


- hmmm Disagree.

While we started well with Sheeds building the culture, when it came time we had a rookie coach in Leon who seemed to have only rookie assistants.
Things went wrong in both 2016 and 2017 and we didnt have an plan b. 2018 was a different kettle of fish altogether.

Leon needed more help than he got.

MEMBERSHIP (PASS)

Contrary to common belief, GWS has actually been reasonably successful in building a membership base in it’s first seven seasons, especially due to the fact they inhabit AFL enemy territory. Despite giving up a one-year head start, GWS’ 2018 membership base of 25,243 has already doubled that of the Gold Coast Suns, which recorded a pitiful 12,108. The Giants even have a larger supporter base than the Brisbane Lions of 24,867. This is a remarkable achievement for GWS considering Brisbane have been in the competition since 1987 with their Fitzroy Lions link dating back to 1883. However, this is also equally concerning for the troubled Lions.
Moreover, their membership base is also expanding at a significant rate of 21% from 2017 to 2018, unlike Gold Coast’s which is declining at an alarming rate. Meaning, GWS has the greatest member growth rate, in that time, in the AFL besides the two most recent premiers in Richmond and West Coast. The critical and growing Western Sydney market also ensures that the Giants have the potential to become the biggest sporting club in the country – perhaps in a few decades time.

- Membership going strong, though 2019 looks to be plateauing.
As the grassroots continue to grow thisll improve.

ATTENDANCES (FAIL)

GWS’ membership base may be strong but their attendances remain incredibly fragile. Even though Gold Coast were forced to play games in Cairns (3,722), Brisbane (6,060) and of course Shanghai (10,689) last year, the Suns still maintained a higher home crowd average attendance than the Giants. But what is worrying about GWS’ crowd numbers are that unlike the Suns they do not have the excuse of diabolical on-field performances. The Suns have been practically uncompetitive for just about the entirety of their AFL lives, whereas, the Giants have made finals for the past three years, yet are still unable to convert their membership numbers to tickets at the gate.
Their members even struggled to flock to their high-performing team in September when only 14,865 turned to their most recent home final in 2017. This was the lowest crowd for a VFL/AFL final since 1916, when the world was fractured by war.

- cant argue here.
Despite us belting the A-League and going toe to toe with the Sydney NRL clubs crowd wise we still are very poor considering our memberships and the massive growth in grassroots.

Hopefully we can get to that magic 17/18k avg
soon.

As an aside regarding the finals. Didnt Melbourne get 16k to a final against freo only a few years ago?
Poor yes but still growing.

NAME (FAIL)

The Greater Western Sydney Giants (deep breath) have struggled marketing their extensive name in their seven-year existence. So much so that they have moved to unofficially reposition themselves as simply “the Giants” with the club believing their nickname alone has a greater ability to cut through to fans, old and new. The “GWS” in “GWS Giants” is also complicated by the club’s presence outside of Western Sydney, in Canberra where it plays three home and away games per year, plus an annual pre-season game.

- Nope fu** off our name rocks.
The whole "the Giants" thing was because everyone down south called us GWS when referring to our nickname.
Had to drum it into the slow bastards.

INDEPENDENCE FROM THE AFL (FAIL)

GWS is still very much a Sydney based AFL headquarters, such is the control the league has over its dependent eighteenth club. In fact, Hawthorn President Jeff Kennett claimed in the Herald Sun recently that a Giants board member told him, “we don’t make a decision, the AFL make all the decisions for us.”
Greater Western Sydney estimates that it will take until around 2032 for the club to become fully viable and not reliant on AFL handouts. Thus, it will be a long time before GWS is able to stand on its own two feet.
But be warned; once the club has a new generation of Western Sydney kids watch the current group and feel a connection to the team as a whole, as a club, they will be Giant.

- What did they expect?
Swans are still under the AFL.
As for Kennets comments, fu** him. A clueless vfler.
If that was the case Matthew's would be gone and Leon would also.
We probably also would be still playing derbies at ANZ.

Interesting that they say the Giants reckon 2032 is when the target is to be stand alone.
Anyone heard anything from the club about this?

OTHER GROWTH AREAS (PASS)

GWS’ Canberra venture has been triumphant on-field with the club transporting the nation’s capital into a fortress claiming victories in eleven of its past twelve encounters. However, off field it has been less prosperous as the Giants have failed to attract its aim of 10,000 ACT based members by 2018. Although, the club is currently in negotiations with the ACT Government about increasing the amount of home games played in Canberra from three to four per year.
The Giants also successfully secured an inaugural license to the AFL Women’s Competition. While, this has seen another wooden spoon arrive at the club, it also means that they have had a significant head start on cross town rivals the Swans in the New South Wales market for women’s football. GWS’ growth has also extended across sports with the club now also boasting a team known as “Giants Netball” that plays in the National Netball League. The team plays home games in both Sydney and Canberra.
Alongside Richmond, GWS is also investigating the prospect of playing the first ever game for premiership points in India, the country that is set to overtake China as the world’s most populous country.


- agree with the pass but dont know how you can be disappointed in our capital brothers and sisters considering their crowds.



As a side note, no mention of grassroots growth in Western Sydney
Is this a Victorian thing as their clubs dont care about anyone under 18?




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Danny88

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Mark Robinsons article on Kelly
https://outline.com/jFUgJN
It sounds positive but time will tell and hopefully he re-signs before the bye and it would be great if it is for 5 or 6 years
The link should work, My first time using outline
If I’m honest.... I’m reading that as a dead set certainty he will sign up with us long term
 

General Giant

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Apr 12, 2012
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Mark Robinsons article on Kelly
https://outline.com/jFUgJN
It sounds positive but time will tell and hopefully he re-signs before the bye and it would be great if it is for 5 or 6 years
The link should work, My first time using outline
I really really hope this is right and he is here for good.

But what else would we expect him to say before the season starts.

Just want him to re-sign so we arent doing this all year.

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