Have Australians ever invented anything?

R Chee Manning

Marlo Snellman
Apr 27, 2019
401
215
AFL Club
Sydney
Australia is a lucky country run mainly by second rate people who share its luck. It lives on other people's ideas, and, although its ordinary people are adaptable, most of its leaders (in all fields) so lack curiosity about the events that surround them that they are often taken by surprise.

Many Australians have an over-inflated view of Australia. Like Kochie on Sunrise they spout all the 'greatest country in the world', 'Australians are the greatest people ever', 'no one else in the world comes close to how good we are'... jingoistic rubbish. There's nothing really that 'special' about people who happen to be lucky enough to live in the lucky country.There are many lists around suggesting Australians have invented a whole swathe of different 'inventions'... on closer inspection though it's clear that Australians aren't as inventive as they crack themselves up to be.

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What have Australians ever invented?
 

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R Chee Manning

Marlo Snellman
Apr 27, 2019
401
215
AFL Club
Sydney
Australia is a lucky country run mainly by second rate people who share its luck. It lives on other people's ideas


In 1919, following the disruption of British Marmite imports after World War I and prior to the introduction of Vegemite, Callister's employer, the Australian company Fred Walker & Co., gave him the task of developing a spread from the used yeast being dumped by breweries. Callister had been hired by the chairman Fred Walker.[6] Vegemite was registered as a trademark in Australia that same year. Callister used autolysis to break down the yeast cells from waste obtained from the Carlton & United brewery. Concentrating the clear liquid extract and blending with salt, celery and onion formed a sticky black paste.

Fred Walker's company first created and sold Vegemite in 1922.
Following a competition to find a name for the new spread, the name "Vegemite" was selected by Fred Walker's daughter, Sheilah. Vegemite first appeared on the market in 1923 with advertising emphasising the value of Vegemite to children's health but failed to sell very well. Faced with growing competition from Marmite, from 1928 to 1935 the product was renamed as "Parwill" to make use of the advertising slogan "Marmite but Parwill", a convoluted pun on the new name and that of its competitor; "If Ma [mother] might... then Pa [father] will." This attempt to expand market share was unsuccessful and the name was changed back to Vegemite, but did not recover lost market share
 
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