How do you fix rugby in Australia?

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fumbler

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Jun 28, 2012
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Swannnnn

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Oct 24, 2017
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As a casual observer of Union, can someone tell me the reasoning why they put restrictions on the selecting Aussie players that play overseas? doesn't make sense to me. I thought you would want to select the best players available regardless if they play in Super Rugby or not.
 

Scotland

TheBrownDog
May 5, 2006
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As a casual observer of Union, can someone tell me the reasoning why they put restrictions on the selecting Aussie players that play overseas? doesn't make sense to me. I thought you would want to select the best players available regardless if they play in Super Rugby or not.
Well NZ do it, so we have to do it too on that basis.

There is more money on offer overseas now, so players need to weigh up Wallabies selection vs how much they can earn. If the ARU allowed players to play anywhere then the talent pool of the 4 SR teams here would be drained. They compromised with the Giteau rule in 2015 and now players have in the back of their minds to get to 60 tests ASAP and then consider moving overseas while staying eligible.
 

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Freomaniac

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How good is RA going on Raelene's watch!!!

She has now resigned and left her post as the boss in the ARU board.

But that 285 million over 5 years in that 2021-25 period would of been a handy and fair deal.
 

General Giant

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Rugby Australia has pitched four national club championship models to broadcasters, including a 32-team knockout competition in the mould of soccer's FFA Cup, as well as an eight-team tournament held over six weeks with potential wildcards from Northern Territory, South Australia and Tasmania.

RA last week outlined the content it would offer up in the new broadcast cycle beginning next year, with Bledisloe Tests, a new version of Super Rugby - either an Australian-based or trans-Tasman version - a state of origin series and super eight concept all put forward.


Also included was a national club championship, which, it is hoped, will be played after existing state-based competitions. The Herald has obtained a copy of the four models drawn up and an outline of what RA would like to see from the competition that will ultimately determine the best club side in the country.

The national club championship would involve existing premier rugby teams and, importantly, the idea is to split revenue evenly across the board rather than reward successful clubs even more.

It will not only need to align with the rugby calendar but also be financially sustainable, with a yet-to-be-determined budget dependant on the amount RA can attract from a broadcaster.


RA does not have a preference for any particular model but is committed to including teams from non-traditional rugby states.

Two of the models feature eight teams, while there are also 16-team and 32-team options which are both knockouts.

The 32-team option is similar to the FFA Cup - but unlike the soccer tournament, professional teams such as the Waratahs wouldn’t be involved. Every state premier rugby competition would be represented but working out how many NSW and Queensland sides would take part, for example, is up for debate. Rankings would be based on performances in respective state-based competitions that year.


RA is keen to form a working group made up of premier rugby clubs and state unions to consider and investigate competition modelling. The group would have a say in determining how many teams from each state would be selected for the nationwide tournament. The bottom line, however, is that broadcasters will have the biggest influence.


Option two is a 16-club knockout competition with 15 matches across four weeks but only with teams from the Shute Shield (NSW), Hospital Cup (QLD), John I Dent Cup (ACT), Dewar Shield (VIC) and Fortescue Premier Grade (WA).

Options three and four, both with eight teams, are round-robin based. One model involves two pools of four teams that come from the five above mentioned states and territory. Each team would play three games, one against each other, before the top two advance to semi-finals.

The other model is similar to the last but two ‘wildcard sides’ will be able to qualify for pool spots, which would also be divided up with four teams split across two pools. The third and fourth models would run for five weeks and six weeks, respectively.

RA is keen to formally begin broadcast negotiations by September 4.


The four National Club Championship models
Model A - Top 32 knockout
32 clubs
Five weeks
31 matches
Every state premier rugby competition represented (NSW, QLD, ACT, VIC, WA, SA, TAS, NT)
Ladder position at the end of state-based competitions determines seeding
Model B - Top 16 knockout
16 clubs
Four weeks
15 matches
Represented across Shute Shield (NSW), Hospital Cup (QLD), John I Dent Cup (ACT), Dewar Shield (VIC) and Fortescue Premier Grade (WA)
Model C - Top 8 (no wildcards)
Eight clubs
Five weeks
15 matches
Two pools of four teams - round robin in each pool across three weeks
Represented across Shute Shield (NSW), Hospital Cup (QLD), John I Dent Cup (ACT), Dewar Shield (VIC) and Fortescue Premier Grade (WA)
Semi-finals – 1st Pool A v 2nd Pool B & 2nd Pool A v 1st Pool B
Final – winners of each semi-final
Model D - Top 8 (with wildcards)
Eight clubs including two wildcard sides.
Six weeks
17 matches
Two wildcard playoffs to qualify for pool stage
Two pools of four teams - round robin in each pool across three weeks
Represented across Shute Shield (NSW), Hospital Cup (QLD), John I Dent Cup (ACT), Dewar Shield (VIC) and Fortescue Premier Grade (WA) – plus potential NT, SA and TAS competition seedings as wildcards
Semi-finals – 1st Pool A v 2nd Pool B & 2nd Pool A v 1st Pool B
Final – winners of each semi-final
 

juss

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I'm a big league fan, but have recently been getting into international rugby and watching a few Wallabies games. The club level doesn't interest me at all.

Compared to league, I have no idea what the rules are and find it impossible to follow what's going on at the moment. There'll be an enormous pack rolling around and suddenly a penalty is blown and I'm clueless as to why.

Its hard to switch between the two codes but I think Union obviously does international rep far better than league.

As a new follower, its harder to get into, it looks like chaos a lot of the time if you're not familiar with the rules.
 

kid_a

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Apr 5, 2010
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I'm a big league fan, but have recently been getting into international rugby and watching a few Wallabies games. The club level doesn't interest me at all.

Compared to league, I have no idea what the rules are and find it impossible to follow what's going on at the moment. There'll be an enormous pack rolling around and suddenly a penalty is blown and I'm clueless as to why.

Its hard to switch between the two codes but I think Union obviously does international rep far better than league.

As a new follower, its harder to get into, it looks like chaos a lot of the time if you're not familiar with the rules.
There are far more nuanced rules that are dependent on the rfs interpretation. A bit like how you might see a pack form in footy and the umps pull a free kick out of it. At the break downs if you want to win the win the ball you have to come in directly front on and remain on your feet, so if somebody is off their feet and tries to prize the ball out they will be penalised. Obvs far more to it than just that but that's a good starting reference to remember.
 

Scotland

TheBrownDog
May 5, 2006
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I'm not a big league fan but the biggest difference I notice is around the breakdown/'play the ball'. In union a tackle is made, ruck is formed and then there could be any number of players joining from either side, counter rucking for a turnover etc. It can be slow and the defence must stay behind the rear of the ruck. In league there is the 6 tackle limit obviously but as soon as their version of a ruck is formed the defending team have to retreat ten metres which helps move the game forward. If offside in league was the same as union with all defending players just lining up behind the tackled player I could see teams routinely getting through 6 tackles without making any progress at all.

League does lend itself a bit more to risk taking with the ball because you know if you charge ahead and are brought down it just becomes the tackle whereas in union if you are outnumbered and are brought to ground it will probably end up a turnover. Union rewards repeat phases and dominating territory. You can make it all the way from one end to the other in 4 tackles in league and then you have 2 chances to score a try before you have to kick. Union sides (particularly those with strong forward packs) will park themselves in the opposition 22 for phase after phase and grind away at the defence until they break through with a run or a driving maul etc. Or as regularly happens the defending team keeps giving away penalties until they lose a player for 10.

I prefer the tactics of union but there are definite positives and negatives to each.
 

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