How to fix goal kicking in the modern game

Boundryump

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Sep 9, 2006
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The problem lies with the boots players are wearing, they are soccer boots and have a rounded top section on the lace, need to bring these back(1958) lol flat top section more consistent contact;)
 

Adelaide Hawk

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I've been thinking about this for a while, but surely someone could do a statistical analysis of where shots at goal are coming from. My gut instinct is that players are trying to kick goals from longer distances, tighter angles and with more pressure than in years passed. So although kicking might be getting better, players are pushing themselves to attempt even harder kicks.
So how does that explain all the pathetic attempts 30 metres out straight in front? Jason Dunstall highlighted a shot at goal from Jenkins where he was waving the ball around rather than keeping it in line with the leg. Because of the way the game is played these days, and the emphasis on more players kicking goals, we don't have that specialist element we had when the likes of Lockett, Dunstall, Ablett used to take ownership of kicking for goal. I am certain there is nowhere near enough emphasis being placed on coaching good goal kicking techniques.

I also think these players are thinking about the posts rather than a space beyond the goals. As someone else posted, these are the same players who can spot up a team mate from 40 metres away, but can't kick for goal for shit. Field kicking has improved out of sight over the years, but kicking for goal from set shots hasn't.
 

FRUMPY

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People who bring common sense like how far out players are and what angle they are on should be banned from such discussion. Please only use stats and % as the evidence of goal kicking accuracy. And please don't bring into consideration players run more these days, more players have shots for goal.
 

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FRUMPY

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So how does that explain all the pathetic attempts 30 metres out straight in front? Jason Dunstall highlighted a shot at goal from Jenkins where he was waving the ball around rather than keeping it in line with the leg. Because of the way the game is played these days, and the emphasis on more players kicking goals, we don't have that specialist element we had when the likes of Lockett, Dunstall, Ablett used to take ownership of kicking for goal. I am certain there is nowhere near enough emphasis being placed on coaching good goal kicking techniques.

I also think these players are thinking about the posts rather than a space beyond the goals. As someone else posted, these are the same players who can spot up a team mate from 40 metres away, but can't kick for goal for shit. Field kicking has improved out of sight over the years, but kicking for goal from set shots hasn't.
You say players can spot up a team-mate from 40 metres away - is that every time? or do they miss these passes from time to time? Average disposal efficiency is probably around 70% and that takes into account handballs and easy 15m kicks. Kicking for goal is harder, especially from angles and distance.

Sure blokes will miss from direct in front - sometimes because of poor technique, sometimes fatigue but mostly pressure
 

GregP3000

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Apr 18, 2011
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As Summer Nights suggests, the problem with using the drop punt in set-shot goalkicking is that it's like dropping a golf ball on a basketball and seeing which direction the golf ball flies off at. Around-the-ground kicking, where the player is basically not encumbered by a man on the mark, is a very different skill. With the foot pointing more towards the ground, players can use the whole of the front of their foot, that is, more contact area, to kick the ball accurately.

In 1971 Peter Hudson equalled the record for the most goals in a season. He didn't use the drop punt, yet he had no problems with accuracy. He generally used the flat punt, a kick you don't see nowadays.

The fact that nearly everyone unquestioningly accepts that the drop punt is the best kick for all players for set-shot goalkicking is surprising, given how poor the standard of set-shot goalkicking has been for a long time.
 

MC Bad Genius

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So how does that explain all the pathetic attempts 30 metres out straight in front? Jason Dunstall highlighted a shot at goal from Jenkins where he was waving the ball around rather than keeping it in line with the leg. Because of the way the game is played these days, and the emphasis on more players kicking goals, we don't have that specialist element we had when the likes of Lockett, Dunstall, Ablett used to take ownership of kicking for goal. I am certain there is nowhere near enough emphasis being placed on coaching good goal kicking techniques.

I also think these players are thinking about the posts rather than a space beyond the goals. As someone else posted, these are the same players who can spot up a team mate from 40 metres away, but can't kick for goal for shit. Field kicking has improved out of sight over the years, but kicking for goal from set shots hasn't.
There have always been players missing from 30m in front from since I started watching footy (mid-1990s). If we could get some data on where goals/behinds are being kicked from (and that data must be out there) from different eras, we'd have some much better analysis of whether kicking for goal has actually gotten worse. At the moment, it's the equivalent of looking at the stats sheet and just saying the player with the most disposals was BOG.
 

Frank Gallagher

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Nah you're better off holding the ball on the right side of the laces with your left hand, then put your right hand between your legs and grab the left side of the laces with your right hand, turn opposite to the goals and kick the ball with your heel.

It can feel a bit awkward at first but it's a winner when you get used to it.
 

sprockets

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Why is goal kicking a different skill to kicking a ball to a teammate?

Goal kicking isn't a skill, kicking is.
Actually, goal kicking accuracy is/would be no different to kicking to a teammate. The difference is that a teammate will move to the position the ball's heading. Goalposts rarely do that. I still remember kicking out from fullback (in a game) and making my brother sprint almost 50 metres to take the mark, and he was no sprinter! :D
 
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HairyO

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Fatigue + an EBA which limits the hours players must attend training.

And coaches who prefer filling those limited hours with psychologists and sports scientists and fitness and recovery and swimming and reviews and game pkanning and every other bloody thing you can think of other than skills training.

Richmond improved when Jack convinced the other forwards to hang around after training for extra practice.

Revolutionary.
 

jdz101

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Bulldogs are the worst in the league. If there's a secret weapon out there to help fix it, I wish I knew what it was. It's maddening.
 

Ancient Tiger

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The problem is mental, not physical. They need psychologists not sports medicine people.

Why? Because we see many players able to kick 40 to 50m passes that hit their target regularly. If they can be that accurate, the problem isn't kicking technique. The mental pressure of kicking for goal changes their technique. If the can be mentally strong enough to imagine a teammate just sitting behind the fence directly in the middle of the goal posts and block everything else out, they won't fluff as many kicks for goal.
 

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GregP3000

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The problem is primarily physical, not mental. This long-standing notion that itโ€™s mental is frankly a load of rubbish. Around-the-ground kicking is a completely different skill in that the player is basically not encumbered by a man on the mark. With the foot pointing more towards the ground, players can use the whole of the front of their foot, that is, more contact area, to kick the ball accurately.
 

kickazz

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Why? Because we see many players able to kick 40 to 50m passes that hit their target regularly. If they can be that accurate, the problem isn't kicking technique.
This is often cited, but i don't think it's a valid argument.

Kicking for goal requires a higher trajectory because you have to go over a man on the mark. The kick also must be high enough to clear defenders on the line

The goals can't move slightly or slow down a bit or speed up a bit to make your kick look better.

I'm yet to see actual numbers of what percentage of passes "hit a teammate in the tit" as opposed to simply favour them over an opponent, or even are not that good at all.

They are different skills.
 

Summer Nights

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But it has improved.
I'd say it hasn't improved since the late 90s (in fact it was better in the few years around 2000). The stats do show, though, that it is better now than prior to 1995; you are right about that.

It could still be so much better, though.
 

Ancient Tiger

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Sep 18, 2007
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This is often cited, but i don't think it's a valid argument.

Kicking for goal requires a higher trajectory because you have to go over a man on the mark. The kick also must be high enough to clear defenders on the line

The goals can't move slightly or slow down a bit or speed up a bit to make your kick look better.

I'm yet to see actual numbers of what percentage of passes "hit a teammate in the tit" as opposed to simply favour them over an opponent, or even are not that good at all.

They are different skills.
I'm talking more about the shots that are 30 to 40m out (actual distance player kicks from). One mistake is players get too close to the man on the mark and that lifts the trajectory. Go further back and kick lower. They should still cover the distance easily.
 

Superstar swan

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Plugger used to do about 40m of running between shots on goal...players these days will do about 2km.

Besides Josh kennedy, there are very few pure forwards in the game...most players spend alot of time up the ground.
 

Superstar swan

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Actually, field kicking accuracy is/would be no different to kicking to a teammate. The difference is that a teammate will move to the position the ball's heading. Goalposts rarely do that. I still remember kicking out from fullback (in a game) and making my brother sprint almost 50 metres to take the mark, and he was no sprinter! :D
Great point, moving targets are much easier to hit...players kick to space and team mates run to space...well thats what most teams do...at the swans we prefer to kick to the point where a player starts a lead from rather than where they will be.....diablolical skills
 

PowerForGood

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I heard that Peter McKenna used to kick the screw / torp as his standard kick didn't he? Thing about this kick is, when not trying to kick the hell out of the ball but in a controlled fashion, is fairly easy to kick.

838 G 447 B says he was a pretty good kick.
 

Wallaby

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I think from the mid 90s onwards, goalkicking has become harder with the improvement in defensive structures. Up until then, defence was basically 1-on-1 - then, because of coaches like Eade (RIP) and others we got flooding, zone defense etc. I think this pushed a lot more attacks out to the flanks and pockets, so there are more goals attempted from there. If you watch the old films from the 70s and 80s, teams might use the wings out to about the midfield, but then they just aimed it straight for the corridor.

Today, defenses realise it is more important to block the corridor and push the forwards out wide. So on the whole, set shots for goal are, on average, more difficult.

Just watch some old films, and then tell me goalkicking - or kicking in general - hasn't improved significantly from the 60s and 70s.
 

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