News Inside the big issues facing the AFL for 2022 and how the game will look after two Covid impacted seasons

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THE THIN MAN

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Footy legend Kevin Bartlett has urged the AFL to scrap the contentious ‘stand’ rule, declaring it an “embarrassing” blight on the game.
The Tigers great said a raft of recent rule changes aimed at reversing plummeting scoring rates had failed miserably, and should all be binned.

Bartlett also believes interchange rotations should be slashed from 75 to 25 if the AFL wants to have a more appealing game for the fans in 2022.

“We have made a lot of changes to the game in the last few years … and I can’t think of one of them that has made any significant difference to scoring,” Bartlett told News Corp.


Kevin Bartlett chats with Damien Hardwick at Richmond training. Picture: Michael Klein

Kevin Bartlett chats with Damien Hardwick at Richmond training. Picture: Michael Klein

Bartlett’s biggest bug bear is the ‘stand’ rule, which he says is contrary to the spirit of the game.

“The ‘stand’ rule is an embarrassment to the game because it pits 18 against 17 and the game was never designed to leave a team a player short,” Bartlett said.

“If a player can’t guard the mark, they are made to look foolish when a player runs off alongside them and the umpire isn’t quick enough to call play on.

“Guarding the mark was always a strong point of the top sides. It was almost an art form. Now the man on the mark is like a statue, sometimes it is like he is stuck in concrete.”

Bartlett said the fact that this year’s Coleman Medallist Harry McKay kicked only 58 goals was further evidence the AFL rule changes had failed.

“This year we bring in the ‘stand’ rule and the leading goalkicker kicks 58 goals for the season, which was the lowest tally since 1965 – apart from last year when we only played 17 games and 16 minute quarters,” he said.

The mastermind of the ‘stand’ rule, former AFL footy boss Steve Hocking, declared in March that he envisaged the return of the 100-goal full forward during his time in charge.

“Give me another couple of years. I’m quietly confident,” Hocking said.

[PLAYERCARD]Harry McKay[/PLAYERCARD] won the Coleman Medal with a total of 58 goals. Picture: Getty Images

Harry McKay won the Coleman Medal with a total of 58 goals. Picture: Getty Images

Bartlett, an AFL Hall of Fame Legend and former Laws of the Game committee member, has also called for the end of the “time-wasting” ruck nomination rule, saying it reminded him of “under 10s”.

“I don’t know why we always need to change things; there was nothing wrong with the third-man up rule,” he said. “It was a great part of the game.”

“All this putting your hand up to say who is going up in the ruck is under 10s stuff.”

Bartlett said the AFL’s decision to cut the interchange cap rotation from 90 to 75 for this year was a step in the right direction, but stressed it was nowhere near enough.

“It was the first time the AFL has really acknowledged that interchange helps to cause congestion and density around the ball, but unfortunately 90 down to 75 doesn’t make a big enough difference,” he said.

“You’ve still got 150 fresh players coming onto the ground and 150 tired players going off.

“I would bring it back to 25 (rotations per side).

“I have heard people say it is radical to bring it down from 75 to 25. Well, it is not radical because we played 100 years with no interchange.

“What is radical is what we are doing now.”

Bartlett was encouraged to hear the AFL would almost certainly keep game time at 20 minutes plus time-on.

“That’s the perfect time for Australian rules football. It is folly for anyone to suggest otherwise. I have never heard anyone walk out of a ground and say the game is too long.”

Bartlett, 74, played 403 games for Richmond between 1965-83.

The AFL is intent on making minimal changes to the game next year after two seasons of Covid-inflicted turmoil.

Hocking, who quit the AFL in July to take charge at Geelong, has been replaced by long-time league legal chief Andrew Dillon and former North Melbourne coach Brad Scott.

Brad Scott has stepped into a football role at the AFL. Picture: Getty Images

Brad Scott has stepped into a football role at the AFL. Picture: Getty Images
Steve Hocking has joined Geelong. Picture: Ian Currie

Steve Hocking has joined Geelong. Picture: Ian Currie

A final decision on the size of next year’s salary cap has not been made, while the football department soft cap of $6.2m will rise by about $250,000.

League boss Gillon McLachlan has already indicated that the grand final will return to its traditional afternoon time slot next year.

The floating fixture used in 2021 is likely to be scrapped.

First to fourth year AFL players will return to training on November 22.

REVEALED: HOW THE GAME WILL LOOK IN 2022
VACCINATIONS

The AFL will avoid imposing a formal “no jab, no play” policy on the game’s 850 players. Instead, players and industry staff will be strongly encouraged to get vaccinated. But no such leniency will apply to football fans. A “no jab, no entry” rule for sports stadiums across the country is likely to be enforced by governments. A formal position from the AFL and the AFL Players’ Association is imminent.

FINANCES

Emergency costs to keep the season alive soared beyond $6m a week at its peak, but club bosses have been told the AFL fared better financially than was forecast in 2021. The net result is tipped to come in well below last year’s operating loss of $22.8m. A $40m bonanza from the Grand Final in Perth was a timely cash injection.

DISTRIBUTIONS

Clubs have been told to brace for cuts to base AFL distributions of about $2m per club next season, but will be given the right to negotiate extra funding based on their financial situation.

SALARY CAP

The exact size of next year’s salary cap remains unknown. Clubs were permitted to spend $13.19m on players this season but negotiations over the 2022 cap are ongoing. Players have taken hefty pay cuts across the two-year Covid crisis. Under the collective bargaining agreement struck prior to Covid, the salary cap was supposed to hit $14.77m in 2022.

Crowds are expected to return to 100 per cent next season. Picture: Michael Klein

Crowds are expected to return to 100 per cent next season. Picture: Michael Klein

SOFT CAP

The $6.2m limit on football department spending will increase by a modest $250,000 next season. Exemptions are in place for some mental health-related expenses. Hawthorn will be the hardest hit, paying $450,000 in the cap as part of its contract settlement with ex-coach Alastair Clarkson.

LIST SIZES

A final decision on list sizes for 2022 has not been made. In 2021, clubs were permitted to have a maximum of 38 primary list players and up to six rookie list players.

MEMBERSHIPS

Massive numbers of club members have stayed loyal across two seasons of disruptions, despite the wipe-out of games at Victorian venues. Melbourne Storm laid down the gauntlet to AFL clubs last week by covering the costs of next year‘s membership fees as a gesture of goodwill.

ATTENDANCES

Crowds are expected to be back to full capacity next season but it remains to be seen whether two years of disruption will have an impact on attendances and spectator habits. Gate takings are crucial to the game’s bottom line.

RULES

AFL football boss Steve Hocking jumped ship in July (to take charge at Geelong), triggering a reshuffle at league headquarters. Former North Melbourne coach Brad Scott has taken over some of Hocking’s responsibilities but reports to the new general manager of football, Andrew Dillon, the league’s long-time legal and integrity chief. Hocking’s contentious ‘stand rule’ failed to curb a slump in scoring but AFL boss Gillon McLachlan has indicated it is here to stay.

GAME LENGTH

A return to 20-minute quarters in 2021 was widely applauded by footy fans and broadcasters (who pay the bulk of the bills). Some, including broadcasters Gerard Healy and Eddie McGuire and Geelong coach Chris Scott, want AFL game time reduced. But it seems certain the AFL will stick with tradition.

COMMISSION

The nine-person AFL Commission has been operating in a reduced capacity since the retirements of Kim Williams and Jason Ball in January. Five club presidents have been engaged to help select their replacements with a heavy emphasis on football industry IQ. Commission chairman Richard Goyder continues to resist calls for a sweeping independent review of the AFL’s governance structure almost 30 years since the last.

CEO

2022 is tipped to be McLachlan’s last season as AFL boss. Senior league executives Andrew Dillon and Travis Auld are the leading internal candidates, while highly-respected Richmond boss Brendon Gale is the club land favourite ahead of straight-shooting Greater Western Sydney CEO Dave Matthews.

Gillon McLachlan is tipped to step down as AFL CEO at the end of next season. Picture: Getty Images

Gillon McLachlan is tipped to step down as AFL CEO at the end of next season. Picture: Getty Images

TRADE PERIOD

The annual player exchange frenzy runs from Monday, October 4 until Wednesday, October 13.

DRAFT

The 2021 AFL national draft will be held in Melbourne over two nights from November 24-25.

BROADCASTING

AFL TV rights partners Foxtel and Channel 7 are contracted until the end of 2024.

GRAND FINAL

McLachlan has conceded there is a strong supporter sentiment for a return to the traditional 2.30pm bounce when the premiership decider returns to the MCG. Talk of an interstate grand final every four or five years is reasonable in principle but would be in breach of a watertight contract between the AFL, the Melbourne Cricket Club and Victorian Government, which has pumped $225 million of taxpayer funds into the league’s privately-owned Marvel Stadium redevelopment in exchange for the agreement.

PRE-SEASON

First to fourth year players will hit the track on November 22. Fifth-season and beyond players return on December 6. Players will be back on leave from December 19 until January 10.

Two finals were played in Tasmania in 2021. Picture: Getty Images

Two finals were played in Tasmania in 2021. Picture: Getty Images

TASMANIA

The highly-anticipated Carter Report into the future of Tasmanian footy was a fizzer but the 18 AFL clubs could still be given the chance to vote on the establishment of a stand-alone Tassie team sometime next year. A growing number of clubs have already expressed in-principle support.

AFLW

The AFLW seasons kicks off on January 6, the last before all 18 clubs fill a team for the 2022/23 season.

FIXTURE

A flexible floating fixture was put in place this year to cater for the Covid-19 crisis but is likely to be scrapped in favour of a traditional schedule where all games and starting times are locked in prior to the season’s commencement. The extent of Thursday night football will depend on an agreement between the league and the players’ union over exposure to five and six-day breaks.

 

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Bojangles17

Hall of Famer
May 17, 2004
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My spider senses tell me , will be a while before we see 2019 type crowds around the afl again in vic . 50k will be the new 75 as peeps take a while to get over Stockholm syndrome and rarely venture past the front door. Won’t worry me I’ll go to every Saturday arvo game we are slotted , but I’m Robinson Crusoe
 

Aeons

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Oct 1, 2017
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Footy legend Kevin Bartlett has urged the AFL to scrap the contentious ‘stand’ rule, declaring it an “embarrassing” blight on the game.
The Tigers great said a raft of recent rule changes aimed at reversing plummeting scoring rates had failed miserably, and should all be binned.

Bartlett also believes interchange rotations should be slashed from 75 to 25 if the AFL wants to have a more appealing game for the fans in 2022.

“We have made a lot of changes to the game in the last few years … and I can’t think of one of them that has made any significant difference to scoring,” Bartlett told News Corp.


Kevin Bartlett chats with Damien Hardwick at Richmond training. Picture: Michael Klein

Kevin Bartlett chats with Damien Hardwick at Richmond training. Picture: Michael Klein

Bartlett’s biggest bug bear is the ‘stand’ rule, which he says is contrary to the spirit of the game.

“The ‘stand’ rule is an embarrassment to the game because it pits 18 against 17 and the game was never designed to leave a team a player short,” Bartlett said.

“If a player can’t guard the mark, they are made to look foolish when a player runs off alongside them and the umpire isn’t quick enough to call play on.

“Guarding the mark was always a strong point of the top sides. It was almost an art form. Now the man on the mark is like a statue, sometimes it is like he is stuck in concrete.”

Bartlett said the fact that this year’s Coleman Medallist Harry McKay kicked only 58 goals was further evidence the AFL rule changes had failed.

“This year we bring in the ‘stand’ rule and the leading goalkicker kicks 58 goals for the season, which was the lowest tally since 1965 – apart from last year when we only played 17 games and 16 minute quarters,” he said.

The mastermind of the ‘stand’ rule, former AFL footy boss Steve Hocking, declared in March that he envisaged the return of the 100-goal full forward during his time in charge.

“Give me another couple of years. I’m quietly confident,” Hocking said.

Harry McKay won the Coleman Medal with a total of 58 goals. Picture: Getty Images

Harry McKay won the Coleman Medal with a total of 58 goals. Picture: Getty Images

Bartlett, an AFL Hall of Fame Legend and former Laws of the Game committee member, has also called for the end of the “time-wasting” ruck nomination rule, saying it reminded him of “under 10s”.

“I don’t know why we always need to change things; there was nothing wrong with the third-man up rule,” he said. “It was a great part of the game.”

“All this putting your hand up to say who is going up in the ruck is under 10s stuff.”

Bartlett said the AFL’s decision to cut the interchange cap rotation from 90 to 75 for this year was a step in the right direction, but stressed it was nowhere near enough.

“It was the first time the AFL has really acknowledged that interchange helps to cause congestion and density around the ball, but unfortunately 90 down to 75 doesn’t make a big enough difference,” he said.

“You’ve still got 150 fresh players coming onto the ground and 150 tired players going off.

“I would bring it back to 25 (rotations per side).

“I have heard people say it is radical to bring it down from 75 to 25. Well, it is not radical because we played 100 years with no interchange.

“What is radical is what we are doing now.”

Bartlett was encouraged to hear the AFL would almost certainly keep game time at 20 minutes plus time-on.

“That’s the perfect time for Australian rules football. It is folly for anyone to suggest otherwise. I have never heard anyone walk out of a ground and say the game is too long.”

Bartlett, 74, played 403 games for Richmond between 1965-83.

The AFL is intent on making minimal changes to the game next year after two seasons of Covid-inflicted turmoil.

Hocking, who quit the AFL in July to take charge at Geelong, has been replaced by long-time league legal chief Andrew Dillon and former North Melbourne coach Brad Scott.

Brad Scott has stepped into a football role at the AFL. Picture: Getty Images

Brad Scott has stepped into a football role at the AFL. Picture: Getty Images
Steve Hocking has joined Geelong. Picture: Ian Currie

Steve Hocking has joined Geelong. Picture: Ian Currie

A final decision on the size of next year’s salary cap has not been made, while the football department soft cap of $6.2m will rise by about $250,000.

League boss Gillon McLachlan has already indicated that the grand final will return to its traditional afternoon time slot next year.

The floating fixture used in 2021 is likely to be scrapped.

First to fourth year AFL players will return to training on November 22.

REVEALED: HOW THE GAME WILL LOOK IN 2022
VACCINATIONS

The AFL will avoid imposing a formal “no jab, no play” policy on the game’s 850 players. Instead, players and industry staff will be strongly encouraged to get vaccinated. But no such leniency will apply to football fans. A “no jab, no entry” rule for sports stadiums across the country is likely to be enforced by governments. A formal position from the AFL and the AFL Players’ Association is imminent.

FINANCES

Emergency costs to keep the season alive soared beyond $6m a week at its peak, but club bosses have been told the AFL fared better financially than was forecast in 2021. The net result is tipped to come in well below last year’s operating loss of $22.8m. A $40m bonanza from the Grand Final in Perth was a timely cash injection.

DISTRIBUTIONS

Clubs have been told to brace for cuts to base AFL distributions of about $2m per club next season, but will be given the right to negotiate extra funding based on their financial situation.

SALARY CAP

The exact size of next year’s salary cap remains unknown. Clubs were permitted to spend $13.19m on players this season but negotiations over the 2022 cap are ongoing. Players have taken hefty pay cuts across the two-year Covid crisis. Under the collective bargaining agreement struck prior to Covid, the salary cap was supposed to hit $14.77m in 2022.

Crowds are expected to return to 100 per cent next season. Picture: Michael Klein

Crowds are expected to return to 100 per cent next season. Picture: Michael Klein

SOFT CAP

The $6.2m limit on football department spending will increase by a modest $250,000 next season. Exemptions are in place for some mental health-related expenses. Hawthorn will be the hardest hit, paying $450,000 in the cap as part of its contract settlement with ex-coach Alastair Clarkson.

LIST SIZES

A final decision on list sizes for 2022 has not been made. In 2021, clubs were permitted to have a maximum of 38 primary list players and up to six rookie list players.

MEMBERSHIPS

Massive numbers of club members have stayed loyal across two seasons of disruptions, despite the wipe-out of games at Victorian venues. Melbourne Storm laid down the gauntlet to AFL clubs last week by covering the costs of next year‘s membership fees as a gesture of goodwill.

ATTENDANCES

Crowds are expected to be back to full capacity next season but it remains to be seen whether two years of disruption will have an impact on attendances and spectator habits. Gate takings are crucial to the game’s bottom line.

RULES

AFL football boss Steve Hocking jumped ship in July (to take charge at Geelong), triggering a reshuffle at league headquarters. Former North Melbourne coach Brad Scott has taken over some of Hocking’s responsibilities but reports to the new general manager of football, Andrew Dillon, the league’s long-time legal and integrity chief. Hocking’s contentious ‘stand rule’ failed to curb a slump in scoring but AFL boss Gillon McLachlan has indicated it is here to stay.

GAME LENGTH

A return to 20-minute quarters in 2021 was widely applauded by footy fans and broadcasters (who pay the bulk of the bills). Some, including broadcasters Gerard Healy and Eddie McGuire and Geelong coach Chris Scott, want AFL game time reduced. But it seems certain the AFL will stick with tradition.

COMMISSION

The nine-person AFL Commission has been operating in a reduced capacity since the retirements of Kim Williams and Jason Ball in January. Five club presidents have been engaged to help select their replacements with a heavy emphasis on football industry IQ. Commission chairman Richard Goyder continues to resist calls for a sweeping independent review of the AFL’s governance structure almost 30 years since the last.

CEO

2022 is tipped to be McLachlan’s last season as AFL boss. Senior league executives Andrew Dillon and Travis Auld are the leading internal candidates, while highly-respected Richmond boss Brendon Gale is the club land favourite ahead of straight-shooting Greater Western Sydney CEO Dave Matthews.

Gillon McLachlan is tipped to step down as AFL CEO at the end of next season. Picture: Getty Images

Gillon McLachlan is tipped to step down as AFL CEO at the end of next season. Picture: Getty Images

TRADE PERIOD

The annual player exchange frenzy runs from Monday, October 4 until Wednesday, October 13.

DRAFT

The 2021 AFL national draft will be held in Melbourne over two nights from November 24-25.

BROADCASTING

AFL TV rights partners Foxtel and Channel 7 are contracted until the end of 2024.

GRAND FINAL

McLachlan has conceded there is a strong supporter sentiment for a return to the traditional 2.30pm bounce when the premiership decider returns to the MCG. Talk of an interstate grand final every four or five years is reasonable in principle but would be in breach of a watertight contract between the AFL, the Melbourne Cricket Club and Victorian Government, which has pumped $225 million of taxpayer funds into the league’s privately-owned Marvel Stadium redevelopment in exchange for the agreement.

PRE-SEASON

First to fourth year players will hit the track on November 22. Fifth-season and beyond players return on December 6. Players will be back on leave from December 19 until January 10.

Two finals were played in Tasmania in 2021. Picture: Getty Images

Two finals were played in Tasmania in 2021. Picture: Getty Images

TASMANIA

The highly-anticipated Carter Report into the future of Tasmanian footy was a fizzer but the 18 AFL clubs could still be given the chance to vote on the establishment of a stand-alone Tassie team sometime next year. A growing number of clubs have already expressed in-principle support.

AFLW

The AFLW seasons kicks off on January 6, the last before all 18 clubs fill a team for the 2022/23 season.

FIXTURE

A flexible floating fixture was put in place this year to cater for the Covid-19 crisis but is likely to be scrapped in favour of a traditional schedule where all games and starting times are locked in prior to the season’s commencement. The extent of Thursday night football will depend on an agreement between the league and the players’ union over exposure to five and six-day breaks.

We need to start a change.org campaign to get rid of the stand bullshit. I absolutely agree with KB that it is a blight and goes totally against the fabric of the game. GILL HAS LOST THE PLOT.
 

Aeons

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Oct 1, 2017
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Agree with KB on the stand rule and ruck nomination. Disagree on further cutting interchange. Seems to me that the more tired players get, the more they'd want to keep the ball in congestion, rather than making themselves even more tired by getting it out in space.

Also the more tired they are, the worse their skills become.
Everyone who follows afl that I know hates the stand rule and wants it gone. Gilligan needs to start listening to fans and scrap the abomination. It looks ridiculous and obviously has not had the positive effect on the game that shocking promised.
 

Hoos

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Everyone who follows afl that I know hates the stand rule and wants it gone. Gilligan needs to start listening to fans and scrap the abomination. It looks ridiculous and obviously has not had the positive effect on the game that shocking promised.
Spot on. Ditto the ruck nomination garbage and the rule that lets a player run 25-30 metres without bouncing the ball after a behind. What the fu** was wrong with kicking it to yourself anyway?
 

mauricerioli

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Everyone who follows afl that I know hates the stand rule and wants it gone. Gilligan needs to start listening to fans and scrap the abomination. It looks ridiculous and obviously has not had the positive effect on the game that shocking promised.
It will be scrapped as soon as Richmond find a way to exploit it.
 

Rayzorwire

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Spot on. Ditto the ruck nomination garbage and the rule that lets a player run 25-30 metres without bouncing the ball after a behind. What the fu** was wrong with kicking it to yourself anyway?

Agreed mate, the stand rule is a joke, ruck nominations are BS, there was nothing wrong with having a 3rd man up, it added a great, naturally developed extra tactical element to stoppages and added a better quality of clearances, which is good for the game.

The kick-outs are a joke too, they've taken away a great part of the theatre of the game by letting sides out of defensive 50 too easily.

The part of that rule I find most baffling, is that preventing sides locking the ball in their attacking half was always very likely to DECREASE scoring.
 

dusty1234!

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Good article
Absolutely agree with KB on the stand rule and the ruck nomination, but disagree on the interchange.
The more tired the players get, the more the ball gets stuck in congestion because the players want to lock it in. Further the overall skill level falls with fatigue, and I don’t think that’s good for the game.
 

Hoos

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The kick-outs are a joke too, they've taken away a great part of the theatre of the game by letting sides out of defensive 50 too easily.
Exactly. And it's not as though the player kicking in couldn't run with the ball before. He just had to kick it to himself, which was a nice little eccentricity of the game.

Well done Gill, you simple minded prick.
 

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Agree with KB on the stand rule and ruck nomination. Disagree on further cutting interchange. Seems to me that the more tired players get, the more they'd want to keep the ball in congestion, rather than making themselves even more tired by getting it out in space.

Also the more tired they are, the worse their skills become.
yep. You nailed it.
 

Masotiger

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My spider senses tell me , will be a while before we see 2019 type crowds around the afl again in vic . 50k will be the new 75 as peeps take a while to get over Stockholm syndrome and rarely venture past the front door. Won’t worry me I’ll go to every Saturday arvo game we are slotted , but I’m Robinson Crusoe
Agree.

But I think it's more than the covid impact. Going to the footy has become more and more of a chore over the years.

Tickets for this, can't go there, can't say boo, rush to get to night games, move for some fat kids mother to buy the little campaigner a hot dog 5 minutes after the game starts, listen to tossers behind you discussing what they did last night instead of watching the game, putting up with flogs more interested in how many possessions some campaigner is getting so they can get their multi up, not to mention the traffic and parking, I can go on and on and on......

And Bro, as for Saturday arvo games, I reckon we can count them on one hand.

I've been to 90% of games in Melbourne over the last 4 decades, and I'll be a member of the RFC for as long as my backside points to the ground; but the days of my backside occupying one of the seats at the game are dwindling fast.
 

Bojangles17

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Agree.

But I think it's more than the covid impact. Going to the footy has become more and more of a chore over the years.

Tickets for this, can't go there, can't say boo, rush to get to night games, move for some fat kids mother to buy the little campaigner a hot dog 5 minutes after the game starts, listen to tossers behind you discussing what they did last night instead of watching the game, putting up with flogs more interested in how many possessions some campaigner is getting so they can get their multi up, not to mention the traffic and parking, I can go on and on and on......

And Bro, as for Saturday arvo games, I reckon we can count them on one hand.

I've been to 90% of games in Melbourne over the last 4 decades, and I'll be a member of the RFC for as long as my backside points to the ground; but the days of my backside occupying one of the seats at the game are dwindling fast.
Yep there’s become a load of reasons and everyone will weight them differently , time,slots is a biggy for me . Less night games and more day games is my preference and now I won’t go if times arent to my liking where previous I’d crawl over broken glass, others talk of price and i haven’t talked of the aversion to crowds for many that has been understated , so the reasons are building which I believe will impact peak crowds , love to be wrong and there’d be a key in turning it around but the greedy afl wouldnt be keen on discounting tickets
 

Hoos

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Tickets for this, can't go there, can't say boo, rush to get to night games, move for some fat kids mother to buy the little campaigner a hot dog 5 minutes after the game starts, listen to tossers behind you discussing what they did last night instead of watching the game, putting up with flogs more interested in how many possessions some campaigner is getting so they can get their multi up, not to mention the traffic and parking, I can go on and on and on......
This. You sound just like me, lol.

And personally, the other one that annoys the fu** out of me is as soon as the quarter ends, we get bombarded with ads, music or the brain dead ground announcer telling us all about what we've just seen and trying to build up some bullshit excitement despite the quarter having finished minutes before.

I head for the exit at each break. And I don't even smoke anymore. The thing is, if you want to talk about the game and how the Tigers are going, etc, you have to do it outside otherwise you need to scream at each other because the announcements/ads/music are set to blitzkrieg volume levels. Whether the idea came from the league or the ground, it's certainly helping to ruin what used to be an enjoyable day or night at the footy.

Unless we lose of course, but that's another story.
 

THE THIN MAN

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This. You sound just like me, lol.

And personally, the other one that annoys the fu** out of me is as soon as the quarter ends, we get bombarded with ads, music or the brain dead ground announcer telling us all about what we've just seen and trying to build up some bullshit excitement despite the quarter having finished minutes before.

I head for the exit at each break. And I don't even smoke anymore. The thing is, if you want to talk about the game and how the Tigers are going, etc, you have to do it outside otherwise you need to scream at each other because the announcements/ads/music are set to blitzkrieg volume levels. Whether the idea came from the league or the ground, it's certainly helping to ruin what used to be an enjoyable day or night at the footy.

Unless we lose of course, but that's another story.
Don't forget crap music after every goal, where they got that idea from I don't know but it can go straight back to where it came from.
 

Hoos

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Cheddar AFC
Don't forget crap music after every goal, where they got that idea from I don't know but it can go straight back to where it came from.
How horrible is that. And that's just watching on TV. Having moved down to Tassie, the last game I attended in person was the glorious 2019 grand final and they weren't doing that music after every goal crap then. Are they doing that in Melbourne? I thought it must be just some stupid sh*t they do in Queensland or Sydney.
 

THE THIN MAN

🏆 🏆 🏆 🏆 🏆 🏆 🏆 🏆 🏆 🏆 🏆 🏆🏆
Jan 7, 2010
10,180
29,369
AFL Club
Richmond
How horrible is that. And that's just watching on TV. Having moved down to Tassie, the last game I attended in person was the glorious 2019 grand final and they weren't doing that music after every goal crap then. Are they doing that in Melbourne? I thought it must be just some stupid sh*t they do in Queensland or Sydney.
The worst thing is hearing it on the 2020 Grand Final Blu-ray...
 

Masotiger

Team Captain
Feb 12, 2020
378
1,166
AFL Club
Richmond
How horrible is that. And that's just watching on TV. Having moved down to Tassie, the last game I attended in person was the glorious 2019 grand final and they weren't doing that music after every goal crap then. Are they doing that in Melbourne? I thought it must be just some stupid sh*t they do in Queensland or Sydney.
Don't think so, I think it's just a light show along the advertising boards around the ground with a roar or something like that at our home games. Either way it's annoying.

A far cry from the days when everyone there was just passionate about the game and you could cut the atmosphere with a knife. Standing in the outer at Victoria Park or Princes Park or Windy Hill was no issue (even in the rain!). The game day comforts today have come at a cost.

In fairness to some of the points I raised previously, that's more so in the AFL members area. There is a lot more passion in the reserved seating section.
 

GhostofJimJess

Norm Smith Medallist
Jan 14, 2002
9,864
6,609
...
AFL Club
Richmond
It's easy to say and agree with "there was nothing wrong with the third-man up rule. It was a great part of the game. All this putting your hand up to say who is going up in the ruck is under 10s stuff.”

But KB overlooks the problem that it was implemented to fix - that players (yes Dangerfield, I'm looking at you!) repeatedly feigned they were taking the ruck contest, and then got a really soft free kick by bumping into an oppo player between them and the ball.

As daft as it is, at least the ruck nomination rule established who you could defend and who you couldn't. It's still preferable to all those soft free kicks.

The Stand rule can get stuffed though.
 

lumpinee

MK ULTRA
Jul 18, 2019
2,153
2,888
across the park from commission flats
AFL Club
Richmond
My spider senses tell me , will be a while before we see 2019 type crowds around the afl again in vic . 50k will be the new 75 as peeps take a while to get over Stockholm syndrome and rarely venture past the front door. Won’t worry me I’ll go to every Saturday arvo game we are slotted , but I’m Robinson Crusoe
id say 2024 would be the earliest anywhere near capacity,in line with all other MAN MADE atrocities manufactured thruout history 3-4 years seems
to be the common length of disruption during these changeovers/handovers of wealth and power
 

Dags2121

Draftee
Feb 23, 2021
16
39
AFL Club
Richmond
It's easy to say and agree with "there was nothing wrong with the third-man up rule. It was a great part of the game. All this putting your hand up to say who is going up in the ruck is under 10s stuff.”

But KB overlooks the problem that it was implemented to fix - that players (yes Dangerfield, I'm looking at you!) repeatedly feigned they were taking the ruck contest, and then got a really soft free kick by bumping into an oppo player between them and the ball.

As daft as it is, at least the ruck nomination rule established who you could defend and who you couldn't. It's still preferable to all those soft free kicks.

The Stand rule can get stuffed though.
Not to mention how we exploited th ruck contests by having Grigg effect games sooo much playing there


Sent from my iPhone using BigFooty.com
 

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