Roast Internet in Australia is a Joke

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frizzle

Norm Smith Medallist
Jun 10, 2009
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Black_White

Brownlow Medallist
Oct 7, 2001
18,290
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I’m hoping that Australians understand that Google are an American company who don’t give a damn about Australia, except for the dollars they can strip out of us.
The Government have my full support here. It’s time a Google and other internet companies pay for the information that they then make millions off.
And it appears that Blackmail is the default reaction by these multi billion dollar entities. Disgraceful.
 

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Markfs

Brownlow Medallist
Nov 13, 2008
15,863
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Fremantle
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Australia has a long history of the government doing the heavy lifting in providing a service, and the private sector then comes in and makes all the money.
There's a legitimate reason sometimes because australian companies can't generate the money to build stuff. However, the result is that australian private industry is lazy and gutless. A lot of crap is thrown at the public sector but the aussie private sector is cut from the same cloth.

The internet before NBN was laughable. A few companies ran their own cables in risk free areas such as between the capital cities but it was basically left to a privatised telstra to wear the costs in low profit areas. It would then on-sell it to the private sector and the private sector would rebundle it and rely on having less support costs to make a quid.

A similar thing happened after NBN but instead of telstra providing the infrastructure, the NBN is doing it. The only competition in the system is between the private sector companies on labour costs and other support costs.

The problem with this hybrid private sector model is that if you have a few houses in a bad internet location, then no company is interested in fixing the problem because there isnt enough money in it. In the past, the public owned telstra would foot the bill, but many people would argue that it wasn't responsive enough to its customers.

Private sector companies in all fields in Australia have fed off governments for too long for an easy quid. When they have to invest their own money to provide infrastructure for their own business, they'll whine to the govt and hope to be covered by public funds. The result is a lot of people in the industry are only interested in a quick buck.
 

magpie_marty

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Apr 30, 2017
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It changes from day to day on FTTN,
Anyways a question?
How would Fiber to the Kerb be delivered ?
I doubt streets would be dug up to install a fibre optic cable to the home owner.
And the cost also?

The other thing is months ago I had problems and my friend (bigpond cough) in Asia boosted my speed to 100 Mpbs.
 

Black_White

Brownlow Medallist
Oct 7, 2001
18,290
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It changes from day to day on FTTN,
Anyways a question?
How would Fiber to the Kerb be delivered ?
I doubt streets would be dug up to install a fibre optic cable to the home owner.
And the cost also?

The other thing is months ago I had problems and my friend (bigpond cough) in Asia boosted my speed to 100 Mpbs.
Don’t have to “dig up streets” to deliver FTTP to those on FTTN.
the same pits, conduits, that house the copper wires are available to carry the fibre optic cables.
This is how it was done in the majority of the FTTP services over the last decade.
I have FTTN, my parents have FTTP. Neither of us had any digging up of streets or driveways.
I know there is no need to dig up the road in my court. The infrastructure exists.
 

jt2020

Draftee
Sep 29, 2020
1
1
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Fremantle
With the advent of fixed wireless and 5G being deployed, at least we're now seeing other options popping up. Hopefully with a bit of competition from other private network operators the game will change a little.

Companies like Node1 and Pentanet are bringing solid fixed wireless solutions to the table if you're fortunate enough to be in their service area. If you're not you'll be stuck on FTTN though. There's talk of some FTTN clients being upgraded to FTTH, but nobody knows how long that's going to take and whether the rumours are actually true. FTTN in Perth is OK in some areas. Cabling in the streets are fairly decent, but Perth is obviously much younger than some of the other cities, so the infrastructure is newer and a tad better herel, although I'd imagine the cabling inside some older houses could be a bit shonky. We've had our internals fixed by the local NBN technician, and we're now getting 92mbps down and 50mbps up, which is fair for streaming movies and stuff.
 

Black_White

Brownlow Medallist
Oct 7, 2001
18,290
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In the Pocket Rocket, lights ablaze!
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With the advent of fixed wireless and 5G being deployed, at least we're now seeing other options popping up. Hopefully with a bit of competition from other private network operators the game will change a little.

Companies like Node1 and Pentanet are bringing solid fixed wireless solutions to the table if you're fortunate enough to be in their service area. If you're not you'll be stuck on FTTN though. There's talk of some FTTN clients being upgraded to FTTH, but nobody knows how long that's going to take and whether the rumours are actually true. FTTN in Perth is OK in some areas. Cabling in the streets are fairly decent, but Perth is obviously much younger than some of the other cities, so the infrastructure is newer and a tad better herel, although I'd imagine the cabling inside some older houses could be a bit shonky. We've had our internals fixed by the local NBN technician, and we're now getting 92mbps down and 50mbps up, which is fair for streaming movies and stuff.
5G isn’t the saviour of home internet that everyone thinks it was going to be.
I‘ve read a couple of articles that show me that 5G is great for phones with limited data plans, but uneconomical for home use.
 

Black_White

Brownlow Medallist
Oct 7, 2001
18,290
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In the Pocket Rocket, lights ablaze!
AFL Club
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Depends what Plans are Available.
Not cheap really, and only interesting if you are a massive user. Which the majority of users are not.
But it’s another option, albeit for very few Australians in the short term.
 

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