Is the 'evolving' cricket ball a blight on our game?

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Thread starter #1
The white ball swung a lot four years ago, then stopped swinging for four years, and now it is swinging again.

Supposedly this is all by accident, and not at all intentional on the part of ball manufacturer Kookaburra or the ICC.

It turns out this [change in swing and seam] is not a conscious effort on the part of either the ICC or Kookaburra nor is it an overnight development. It might just be natural evolution. "There's been no directive on changing the white ball for this World Cup, nor anything definitively changed," Kookaburra told ESPNcricinfo. "There is a constant evolution that dates right back to World Series Cricket in 1977 and through to the pink ball for day-night Test cricket, with improved hardness and finish of the ball the key objectives; we research, test and improve, and this is the result."

The ICC confirmed to ESPNcricinfo it has made no specific request to Kookaburra in this regard.


Cricinfo: Glossier balls offering more swing in World Cup

Consider the difference it makes to individual players and to overall match outcomes when the ball is swinging vs when it is not.

And then consider that in the article, Trent Boult says that even the seams on the current white balls (for this world cup) are different from the seams on balls used previously.

The ball is the up there with the pitch in terms of the most important element of the game, helping some players/teams and hindering others, and yet it is allowed to 'evolve', apparently all on its own, without any intervention from the ball manufacturer or the ICC.

Is this a farce? Does anybody care?
 

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frankrizzo

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#7
This might seem an odd question but does anybody know when the first white ball odi was outside Australia?

The first white ball game was here in 77 but they were still using the red ball in world cups till aus 92 but i imagine some other teams at least tried it between then but i just cant remember.
 
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There's been a different soccer ball for every FIFA World Cup, too.

Things change.
Does the ball change for Soccer World Cups help certain players / teams and hinder others?

Before you give me an instant, defensive response of 'yes', think through it for a moment.
 

big_e

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#9
Does the ball change for Soccer World Cups help certain players / teams and hinder others?

Before you give me an instant, defensive response of 'yes', think through it for a moment.
1974 ball was particularly resistant to sandpaper, if that's what you mean.
 

HTPunter

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#10
Yeah I don't quite get it. As a fan I'd like to know the objectives of what they want to achieve when developing a ball and how do they 'rate' it? Is it equal ground for longevity, swing etc.
 
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