John(bruz) Barilaro - defamation case V FriendlyJordies; Quits after ICAC investigation announced.

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nut

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I mean... without wanting to minimise his work I think you are overrating his impact just a smidge here

Specifically what part? His work on barilaro? Porter? McBride? ClubsNsw?
Or his 700k subscribers?
Or his average weekly views that is more than any single Skynews “news” show? Bolt and Credlin combined.

His reach is wide and his impact is huge.
He dwarfs Alan Jones YouTube? Lol.

Not to mention his sold out shows across Australian that he donates the profits to charities like flood victims etc…
 
Last edited:

Ned_Flanders

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What significant story have they published that has brought down a premier and deputy premier? Exposed ClubNsw … the forestry commission? Etc etc?

from wiki

Life and career[edit]​

McKenzie graduated from RMIT University, Melbourne with a Bachelor of Arts (Journalism) in 2001.[12] He also holds a Masters in International Politics from the University of Melbourne and is currently obtaining a Melbourne JD (Juris Doctor), from Monash University.[13]

He firstly worked as a cadet journalist at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, later joining Fairfax Media (publisher of The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald). McKenzie's reporting has led to a number of government inquiries and police investigations, including a federal police probe into political donations given by alleged mafia figures.[14]

In 2009, a report by McKenzie and colleague Richard Baker into foreign bribery involving Reserve Bank of Australia subsidiaries sparked a national scandal.[15] It led to Australia's first-ever foreign bribery prosecution in 2011 and guilty pleas of RBA firms Securency and Note Printing Australia.[16][15] McKenzie and Baker were awarded a Walkley Award for Investigative Reporting for their investigation, which also led to the governor of the Reserve Bank, Glenn Stevens, testifying before a Senate committee to respond to allegations the bank mishandled the scandal.[17]

In 2012, McKenzie’s reporting on corruption and organised crime within the Australian Customs service was recognised with a Walkley Award.[18] The reporting led to reforms of the Australian customs service announced in 2013 by Home Affairs Minister Jason Clare and overseen by former NSW judge James Wood.[19] In 2012, McKenzie obtained confidential Victoria Police files documenting the suicides of at least 40 people sexually abused by Catholic clergy in Victoria.[1][20] Victorian Premier Ted Baillieu immediately called a parliamentary inquiry into abuse allegations by religious clergy.[21]

A 2012 interview McKenzie conducted with sports scientist Steven Dank was used by Australia’s anti-doping agency ASADA in its controversial doping case against the Essendon Football Club.[22]

In 2014, a news story by McKenzie on Four Corners into abuse in disability care homes led to a Victorian Ombudsman inquiry and a federal senate inquiry, which recommended a royal commission that was later announced by the Morrison Government.[23]

McKenzie has been involved in many high profile stories.[1] He interviewed Australian terrorist leader Abdul Nacer Benbrika before Benbrika was prosecuted for leading terror cells in Sydney and Melbourne. During Benbrika’s court case, the public prosecutor told the court that Benbrika was covertly recorded by authorities claiming that he had threatened McKenzie, telling him to “watch yourself” and that he knew how to find the reporter.[24]

In 2014, a report co-authored by McKenzie on an undisclosed multi-million dollar payment to Hong Kong chief executive CY Leung from Australian company UGL, prompted widespread calls for Leung's resignation and sparked an investigation by Hong Kong authorities.[25]

In 2016, McKenzie and Baker revealed the Unaoil oil industry corruption scandal that implicated some of the world's biggest oil industry firms, including Rolls-Royce, ABB, Petrofac and Halliburton in alleged corruption involving a Monaco firm called Unaoil.[26] In 2019, the founders of Unaoil pleaded guilty to bribery and corruption offences in the United States.[27]

McKenzie is Jewish [28]

Documentaries[edit]​

McKenzie was awarded the Graham Perkin Australian Journalist of the Year Award and the Lowy Institute Media Award for reporting on foreign interference in Australia by the Chinese Communist Party.[29][30]

His 2017 Four Corners documentary program Power and Influence reported that ASIO had warned Australian political parties about receiving donations from two men, billionaires Huang Xiangmo and Chau Chak Wing.[31] It also reported that former Trade Minister Andrew Robb had been hired on a $880,000 yearly consultancy by a company closely linked to the Chinese government.

The story was a catalyst for Australia's controversial counter foreign interference laws and later led to the resignation of senator Sam Dastyari over his dealings with Huang.[32][31] Huang was expelled from Australia by ASIO on security grounds, but denied the allegations about him,[33] while Chau Chak Wing commenced defamation proceedings.[34][35]

In July 2019, McKenzie presented Crown Unmasked detailing corporate misconduct involving Crown Resorts, including allegations Crown was working with casino junket operators owned by Hong Kong’s triads.[36] The investigation also reported Australia’s Department of Home Affairs favoured visa applications by Crown’s VIP gamblers, including criminals. Crown attacked the reporting in advertisements, describing it as “a deceitful campaign.” Crown's chairwoman Helen Coonan in 2020 told a commission of inquiry into Crown's suitability to hold a gaming licence that the advertisement contained significant errors.[37] The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission also opened probes into the money laundering allegations.[38]

On 14 June 2020, McKenzie reporting for The Age and Nine Network released covert recordings purporting to show cabinet minister and Labor party power broker Adem Somyurek organising branch stacking. Somyurek is alleged to have registered local party members with false details, taking funds from business owners to pay for party membership fees, and directing ministerial staffers to engage in wrongdoing.[39] Included in the numerous covert recordings, are several sections where Somyurek is heard making derogatory comments towards MPs Gabrielle Williams and Marlene Kairouz and ministerial staffers, which have been described as sexist and homophobic.[39]

“This is going to be relentless; we're just going to go * them. We're just going to go to town. This is ******* war. We've got ******* massive numbers, we've got about thirty going in every week...”
— [39], Covert audio recording of Somyurek
On 15 June 2020, Premier Dan Andrews sacked Somyurek from his cabinet and referred Somyurek's conduct to the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission for further investigation.[40] Andrews also wrote to the National Executive of the Australian Labor Party (ALP) to seek the termination of Somyurek's party membership. Later that day, the Labor Party's national president, Wayne Swan, confirmed that Somyurek had resigned his membership and there would "never be a place for Somyurek in the ALP ever again".[41]

Court cases and shield laws[edit]​

In 2010, McKenzie and investigative reporters Ben Schneiders and Royce Millar revealed political parties were storing personal information about voters, raising privacy concerns.[42] A Greens party candidate had supplied the password to the ALP Eleczilla voter profile database,[43] prompting the police to charged the trio with unauthorised access to a restricted database.[44] The trio admitted responsibility for the database access as part of a court diversion program, avoiding a conviction.[45] The trio’s barrister said there was a public interest in whether political parties should maintain such data and that investigative journalists provide “genuine service to this community.”[46] The Age published a news article acknowledging the unlawful conduct,[47] while editor-in-chief Andrew Holden defended the reporting, stating investigative journalists needed to report public interest stories.[45]

In a 2013 source case brought by a political donor in the Supreme Court of New South Wales, three journalists including McKenzie made an application to keep their sources confidential, but could not rely on shield laws as they hadn’t been introduced. Justice Lucy McCallum ruled a journalist's pledge to keep a source confidential "is not a right or an end in itself" and could be overridden "in the interests of justice,"[48] but the case was settled and no sources disclosed.[49]

In 2015, McKenzie defeated a Victorian Supreme Court application brought by an alleged mafia figure for disclosure of his sources in the first legal test of Victoria’s journalist shield laws.[50][51] The case was described by the ABC's Media Watch program as a landmark test of source protection.[52] The court ruled that identifying McKenzie’s sources would jeopardise their safety, that there was a strong public interest in reporting on the mafia's infiltration of politics and that there would be a chilling effect if disclosure was granted.[51] The Australian journalists’ union, the MEAA, described the decision as “important for public interest journalism,"[50] but other reporting suggested shield laws still remained unsatisfactory.[53][52] In his ruling, Supreme Court Justice John Dixon found that it was reasonable for police to suspect the alleged mafia figure placed a $200,000 “hit” on the suspected newspaper source.[54][55]

In 2016, the alleged mafia boss abandoned his defamation legal action against The Age over a series of articles describing him as a mafia boss involved in murder, extortion and drug trafficking.[56] The Age published an apology noting the man was never charged by the police, but did not retract reports identifying him as the head of the Calabrian mafia.[56]

In 2017, the ABC reached a confidential settlement with the Chinese Students and Scholars Association president after she appeared in a Four Corners program reported by McKenzie about the influence of the Chinese Communist Party in Australian politics and universities. The president demanded an apology but this was refused and instead Four Corners added an editors note to the program transcript.”[57]

In 2017, McKenzie and veteran reporter Chris Masters produced several reports detailing allegations that Australia’s special forces committed war crimes in Afghanistan. They reported that Victoria Cross recipient Ben Roberts-Smith is under investigation by the federal police and the military inspector general.[58] Roberts-Smith attacked the claims as unfounded and is suing McKenzie and Masters for defamation.[59] The trial is due to commence in June 2021 in Sydney.[60]
 

nut

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from wiki

Life and career[edit]​

McKenzie graduated from RMIT University, Melbourne with a Bachelor of Arts (Journalism) in 2001.[12] He also holds a Masters in International Politics from the University of Melbourne and is currently obtaining a Melbourne JD (Juris Doctor), from Monash University.[13]

He firstly worked as a cadet journalist at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, later joining Fairfax Media (publisher of The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald). McKenzie's reporting has led to a number of government inquiries and police investigations, including a federal police probe into political donations given by alleged mafia figures.[14]

In 2009, a report by McKenzie and colleague Richard Baker into foreign bribery involving Reserve Bank of Australia subsidiaries sparked a national scandal.[15] It led to Australia's first-ever foreign bribery prosecution in 2011 and guilty pleas of RBA firms Securency and Note Printing Australia.[16][15] McKenzie and Baker were awarded a Walkley Award for Investigative Reporting for their investigation, which also led to the governor of the Reserve Bank, Glenn Stevens, testifying before a Senate committee to respond to allegations the bank mishandled the scandal.[17]

In 2012, McKenzie’s reporting on corruption and organised crime within the Australian Customs service was recognised with a Walkley Award.[18] The reporting led to reforms of the Australian customs service announced in 2013 by Home Affairs Minister Jason Clare and overseen by former NSW judge James Wood.[19] In 2012, McKenzie obtained confidential Victoria Police files documenting the suicides of at least 40 people sexually abused by Catholic clergy in Victoria.[1][20] Victorian Premier Ted Baillieu immediately called a parliamentary inquiry into abuse allegations by religious clergy.[21]

A 2012 interview McKenzie conducted with sports scientist Steven Dank was used by Australia’s anti-doping agency ASADA in its controversial doping case against the Essendon Football Club.[22]

In 2014, a news story by McKenzie on Four Corners into abuse in disability care homes led to a Victorian Ombudsman inquiry and a federal senate inquiry, which recommended a royal commission that was later announced by the Morrison Government.[23]

McKenzie has been involved in many high profile stories.[1] He interviewed Australian terrorist leader Abdul Nacer Benbrika before Benbrika was prosecuted for leading terror cells in Sydney and Melbourne. During Benbrika’s court case, the public prosecutor told the court that Benbrika was covertly recorded by authorities claiming that he had threatened McKenzie, telling him to “watch yourself” and that he knew how to find the reporter.[24]

In 2014, a report co-authored by McKenzie on an undisclosed multi-million dollar payment to Hong Kong chief executive CY Leung from Australian company UGL, prompted widespread calls for Leung's resignation and sparked an investigation by Hong Kong authorities.[25]

In 2016, McKenzie and Baker revealed the Unaoil oil industry corruption scandal that implicated some of the world's biggest oil industry firms, including Rolls-Royce, ABB, Petrofac and Halliburton in alleged corruption involving a Monaco firm called Unaoil.[26] In 2019, the founders of Unaoil pleaded guilty to bribery and corruption offences in the United States.[27]

McKenzie is Jewish [28]

Documentaries[edit]​

McKenzie was awarded the Graham Perkin Australian Journalist of the Year Award and the Lowy Institute Media Award for reporting on foreign interference in Australia by the Chinese Communist Party.[29][30]

His 2017 Four Corners documentary program Power and Influence reported that ASIO had warned Australian political parties about receiving donations from two men, billionaires Huang Xiangmo and Chau Chak Wing.[31] It also reported that former Trade Minister Andrew Robb had been hired on a $880,000 yearly consultancy by a company closely linked to the Chinese government.

The story was a catalyst for Australia's controversial counter foreign interference laws and later led to the resignation of senator Sam Dastyari over his dealings with Huang.[32][31] Huang was expelled from Australia by ASIO on security grounds, but denied the allegations about him,[33] while Chau Chak Wing commenced defamation proceedings.[34][35]

In July 2019, McKenzie presented Crown Unmasked detailing corporate misconduct involving Crown Resorts, including allegations Crown was working with casino junket operators owned by Hong Kong’s triads.[36] The investigation also reported Australia’s Department of Home Affairs favoured visa applications by Crown’s VIP gamblers, including criminals. Crown attacked the reporting in advertisements, describing it as “a deceitful campaign.” Crown's chairwoman Helen Coonan in 2020 told a commission of inquiry into Crown's suitability to hold a gaming licence that the advertisement contained significant errors.[37] The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission also opened probes into the money laundering allegations.[38]

On 14 June 2020, McKenzie reporting for The Age and Nine Network released covert recordings purporting to show cabinet minister and Labor party power broker Adem Somyurek organising branch stacking. Somyurek is alleged to have registered local party members with false details, taking funds from business owners to pay for party membership fees, and directing ministerial staffers to engage in wrongdoing.[39] Included in the numerous covert recordings, are several sections where Somyurek is heard making derogatory comments towards MPs Gabrielle Williams and Marlene Kairouz and ministerial staffers, which have been described as sexist and homophobic.[39]


On 15 June 2020, Premier Dan Andrews sacked Somyurek from his cabinet and referred Somyurek's conduct to the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission for further investigation.[40] Andrews also wrote to the National Executive of the Australian Labor Party (ALP) to seek the termination of Somyurek's party membership. Later that day, the Labor Party's national president, Wayne Swan, confirmed that Somyurek had resigned his membership and there would "never be a place for Somyurek in the ALP ever again".[41]

Court cases and shield laws[edit]​

In 2010, McKenzie and investigative reporters Ben Schneiders and Royce Millar revealed political parties were storing personal information about voters, raising privacy concerns.[42] A Greens party candidate had supplied the password to the ALP Eleczilla voter profile database,[43] prompting the police to charged the trio with unauthorised access to a restricted database.[44] The trio admitted responsibility for the database access as part of a court diversion program, avoiding a conviction.[45] The trio’s barrister said there was a public interest in whether political parties should maintain such data and that investigative journalists provide “genuine service to this community.”[46] The Age published a news article acknowledging the unlawful conduct,[47] while editor-in-chief Andrew Holden defended the reporting, stating investigative journalists needed to report public interest stories.[45]

In a 2013 source case brought by a political donor in the Supreme Court of New South Wales, three journalists including McKenzie made an application to keep their sources confidential, but could not rely on shield laws as they hadn’t been introduced. Justice Lucy McCallum ruled a journalist's pledge to keep a source confidential "is not a right or an end in itself" and could be overridden "in the interests of justice,"[48] but the case was settled and no sources disclosed.[49]

In 2015, McKenzie defeated a Victorian Supreme Court application brought by an alleged mafia figure for disclosure of his sources in the first legal test of Victoria’s journalist shield laws.[50][51] The case was described by the ABC's Media Watch program as a landmark test of source protection.[52] The court ruled that identifying McKenzie’s sources would jeopardise their safety, that there was a strong public interest in reporting on the mafia's infiltration of politics and that there would be a chilling effect if disclosure was granted.[51] The Australian journalists’ union, the MEAA, described the decision as “important for public interest journalism,"[50] but other reporting suggested shield laws still remained unsatisfactory.[53][52] In his ruling, Supreme Court Justice John Dixon found that it was reasonable for police to suspect the alleged mafia figure placed a $200,000 “hit” on the suspected newspaper source.[54][55]

In 2016, the alleged mafia boss abandoned his defamation legal action against The Age over a series of articles describing him as a mafia boss involved in murder, extortion and drug trafficking.[56] The Age published an apology noting the man was never charged by the police, but did not retract reports identifying him as the head of the Calabrian mafia.[56]

In 2017, the ABC reached a confidential settlement with the Chinese Students and Scholars Association president after she appeared in a Four Corners program reported by McKenzie about the influence of the Chinese Communist Party in Australian politics and universities. The president demanded an apology but this was refused and instead Four Corners added an editors note to the program transcript.”[57]

In 2017, McKenzie and veteran reporter Chris Masters produced several reports detailing allegations that Australia’s special forces committed war crimes in Afghanistan. They reported that Victoria Cross recipient Ben Roberts-Smith is under investigation by the federal police and the military inspector general.[58] Roberts-Smith attacked the claims as unfounded and is suing McKenzie and Masters for defamation.[59] The trial is due to commence in June 2021 in Sydney.[60]

Impressive but has a bit more to catch up to Jordan .. 😂.

Jordon Shanks is Having an impact with limited resources, but he does have the freedom to investigate what ever he wants, with out commercial considerations…
That’s why I rate him higher than any corporate journalist.
Jordan now is very well respected and has some very well connected Allie’s…whistleblowers trust him, ex Pms trust him…
It’s clear the trust in commercial journalism is at an all time low, as seen by the Herald sun and NewsCorps influence in both the federal and numerous state elections.
So I’d love journalists like Baker and McKenzie to go it alone too… but are they scared to leave the gravy train?
 

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Caesar

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Specifically what part? His work on barilaro? Porter? McBride? ClubsNsw?
Or his 700k subscribers?
Or his average weekly views that is more than any single Skynews “news” show? Bolt and Credlin combined.

His reach is wide and his impact is huge.
He dwarfs Alan Jones YouTube? Lol.

Not to mention his sold out shows across Australian that he donates the profits to charities like flood victims etc…
you are giving him credit for stuff that he had a peripheral role in at best

not to say he is irrelevant but I think you probably need to get out of the echo chamber a bit more
 

nut

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you are giving him credit for stuff that he had a peripheral role in at best

not to say he is irrelevant but I think you probably need to get out of the echo chamber a bit more

Are you serious???! You obviously have no idea … ask Adam Searle who he thinks has had the biggest impact on the outgoing of the NSW LNP and exposing corruption … FFS they used the fixated persons unit to try and silence his producer … don’t comment on things you have NFI on.
 

nut

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you are giving him credit for stuff that he had a peripheral role in at best

not to say he is irrelevant but I think you probably need to get out of the echo chamber a bit more

… and when I asked for specifics you offered nothing.
 

nut

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The influence of main stream media in this country, which is controlled by corporate interests and lobby groups is why we have been denied our natural wealth … it’s basically been all pissed up against the wall. Handed out to a few … and mostly been funneled out overseas…
Australia has been rapped … gold, iron ore, oil, gas, agriculture etc etc … and we are a Trillion in debt … we should be the richest country on the planet…

And when someone actually exposes the corruption we get twits playing down their influence… its too funny … it’s too sad.

Australians are next level stupid… just bend over and take it.

What we need is more journalist doing journalism for the good of the people..

Michael west
Jordan Shanks
Shane Dowling
 

nut

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Yer yer the peripheral …. Lol

NFI





And then his house gets fire bombed …
But yer … let’s play down the influence of his journalism.
 

Not Important

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NSW Labor is like the Vic Libs (Matthew who?). Who is the opposition leader in NSW? I have NFI and presumably neither do most NSWers.
the n.s.w peeps know full well who the labor leader is . the person 2 whom you r the spiritual advisor is on a paper thin margin. he's a gonna come the election.
 

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NSW Labor should win (much to the disgust of the white collar Twitterati who despise FJ).

And a reminder of why his video on blue ticks was recieved with a lot of support.
Fi6sCVKaUAAY6fM.jpeg
 

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