Kalgoorlie Racism (government endorsed)

Herne Hill Hammer

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He didn't just chase him down. Apparently he took the day off work, went and waited at an area where the cops apparently told him bikes were 'dumped' and then sped after Elijah. The perpetrator said he tried to force him into the scrub. Elijah stayed on the track and was hit by the 4WD.

It's hard to see how he got such a lenient sentence, but his clean record was presumably major. You can understand the anger, though, considering the cops role in directing him down there (allegedly) and not respecting the crime scene - even though they knew before getting there what had happened. They drove over the tracks, so it became solely about his story matching the only evidence: CCTV footage of him going past at 67KM/H, and the crushed bike and body.
You obviously saw all of it, after all, you've, 'been to Kalgoorlie.

Whatever that means.
 

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You obviously saw all of it, after all, you've, 'been to Kalgoorlie.

Whatever that means.
Good to see one small bit of real life info can reduce this thread to a snobby backpacker declaring 'Have you really traveled, man? No, bro, like a decade in one country, like me, barely scratches the surface, man'.
 

Herne Hill Hammer

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Good to see one small bit of real life info can reduce this thread to a snobby backpacker declaring 'Have you really traveled, man? No, bro, like a decade in one country, like me, barely scratches the surface, man'.
So I guess that means you're talking out of your arse. Again.

Did your plane get diverted once because of storms and you had to fly over Kal or did you do the Nullabor on the Indian Pacific and it stopped in Kal for an hour and you got out on the platform and stretched your legs and had a coffee?

I have been to Kalgoorlie. As with most place that are called 'dangerous', the actual chances of running into something dangerous remain very low. There are exceptions to that rule, but Kalgoorlie isn't one of them.

This sentence is what I was asking about.

What is your experience with Kal apart from, 'I have been to Kalgoorlie.' All I asked for was a bit of context in your Kal experience or experiences. On what experience do you base your claim that, 'the actual chances of running into something dangerous remain very low.'
 
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So I guess that means you're talking out of your arse. Again.

Did your plane get diverted once because of storms and you had to fly over Kal or did you do the Nullabor on the Indian Pacific and it stopped in Kal for an hour and you got out on the platform and stretched your legs and had a coffee?

I have been to Kalgoorlie. As with most place that are called 'dangerous', the actual chances of running into something dangerous remain very low. There are exceptions to that rule, but Kalgoorlie isn't one of them.

This sentence is what I was asking about.

What is your experience with Kal apart from, 'I have been to Kalgoorlie.' All I asked for was a bit of context in your Kal experience or experiences. On what experience do you base your claim that, 'the actual chances of running into something dangerous remain very low.'
Odd that you think this is a quote worth highlighting, but then you didn't quote it. Let me do it for you:
I'm not sure if you have been to Kalgoorlie but this is spot on, as I said earlier in many ways I like the place but it is genuinely dangerous especially after sun down.
I have been to Kalgoorlie. As with most place that are called 'dangerous', the actual chances of running into something dangerous remain very low. There are exceptions to that rule, but Kalgoorlie isn't one of them. The comment on hyperbole was because a story about a woman having her purse and car stolen was caused by kids. FBF mentioned "young people" not feeling safe. That's a very wide term and not reflected in that story, hence why I thought it was an emotionally-orientated appeal. A different way of saying "won't somebody think of the children!!!".
Easy.
Answer the question Ratts of Tobruk.
If you're that bored with your lunchtime, feel free to help quotemokc look up Primary sources for Elijah's case. Unless you found them, quotemokc?
 
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That guy didn't answer the question
Which one? :)
Did you live there? If so, which part did you live in?
Were you just visiting? Visiting friends or for work purposes?
Did you fly in or drive in?
Did you stay in a private residence or a hotel? What part of Kal was the private residence in? Which hotel if it was a hotel?
How long were you there for?
What part/s did you live stay in?.
What did you do while you were there if just visiting?
If you were there for work purposes, did you do anything in your downtime?
How long in total do you think you've spent in Kal? What was the longest you've spent there in any one stint?
But as I said before, it is funny to see this thread reduced to creepy questions simple by the introduction of one fact which slightly went against the narrative.
 

Herne Hill Hammer

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Full of more shit than a Werribee duck.

I'm disappointed you didn't at least go to the effort of googling some witty little anecdotes and pass them off as your own.

You're the epitome of a keyboard warrior. Clacking away on your keyboard from the safety of your dimly lit study.
 

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Sinjin Smith

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It isn't funny, and you aren't clever.

You said you've been to Kal and won't give any details other than that. That's it.
Reminds me of a mate who had been to Chicago who claimed "the city was ******* awesome", when pressed on where he stayed and for how long it turns out it was O'Hare International and a couple of hours during a lay over.
 

Scotland

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Reminds me of a mate who had been to Chicago who claimed "the city was ******* awesome", when pressed on where he stayed and for how long it turns out it was O'Hare International and a couple of hours during a lay over.
Reminds me of my trip to Belgium. When I say to Belgium I mean through Belgium on a train between Amsterdam and Paris, but I feel I am a qualified expert on all things Belgian now.
 
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Is it too late to mention I've been to Kalgoorlie too?
It's all a bit 'doth protest too much', isn't it? Almost like they haven't been to Kalgoorlie, or Chicago, or Belgium, and actually believe the crap alt-right sites might spin about them. It reminds me of Xsess not understanding that Roma he saw in Paris weren't the 'Muslims taking over Europe' he'd heard so much about, let alone the terrorists he was keen to label them as.

Now, given there are plenty of West Aussies on BF, I think we can back that a number have been to Kalgoorlie. But also, given the professed shock at people sleeping in parks, I'm thinking not many of them are chipping in above. All the scenarios they're imagining about me might be about their own insecurity?
 
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Did spend time at Agricola college. Was told to never leave clothes on the line once the sun went down. Have seen plenty of interesting intruders walk into the premises and be stopped and escorted to the exit as they were about to enter the buildings.
 

Egga

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I've just finished a week living and working within an indigenous community in remote NT. My time was focused purely on understanding indigenous culture by talking to local indigenous people whitefellas closely connected with the community as well as magistrates, NGOs, community leaders, social workers, rangers, retailers and others.

I went in with an open mind and am still processing my experience. I came to this thread hoping to find some discussion to help me make sense of my time in the community.

I am no tree hugging hippie and while my experience was immersive, it was also brief. Nevertheless, a couple of observations I would like to contribute to the discussion are:

First, no-one should be satisfied with the state of indigenous quality of life, which includes, on average, poorer health, education, life expectancy, crime and addiction outcomes. Also, any person who has experienced robbery, assault, offensive drunkenness, etc. has every right to be angry at the perpetrator and I understand people's frustration that, despite the investments made in indigenous people, they continue to be over indexed in criminal metrics. I would also add that the vast majority of indigenous people go through their life without being arrested or addicted and that violence, addiction and apathy are not the behaviours you expect to find amongst happy people. No-one is less happy, more angry or more frustrated with the circumstances of indigenous people than the people themselves.

Second, there are some incredibly capable people (and some less capable people too) doing amazing work within indigenous communities.

I understand why some people lament their hard earned tax dollars being pumped into indigenous welfare - not because the cause is unworthy, but because the results are often poor. While some of these dollars fund some fantastic people and programs, I found it amazing how much investment was wasted (despite good intentions) in programs, engagement and timeframes that simply would not work in the communities they were designed for.

Many welfare and community programs that might work for other parts of the community are ineffective in indigenous communities due to different fundamental values and expectations around work, relationships, property, time, family, etc. For example, in the community I visited, some well intentioned family welfare programs had quite destructive side effects.

My limited experience led me to believe that, at least in the community I visited, more understanding of indigenous cultures and more engagement in program design is far more important than more money. Unfortunately, the short term pressures of electoral cycles sometimes leads to rushed programs that don't engage the community and therefore don't achieve the results intended.

The difference between indigenous and White Aussie cultures is enormous. Apportioning blame between genocidal Europeans and recalcitrant indigenous people misses the point. Right now, Indigenous Australians are struggling to flourish in a European system because in many ways it conflicts rather than complements their culture.

NOT supporting indigenous Aussies is not going to make things better. We have to do a better job at understanding each other so the investments we make generate better results. For example, anyone who ever wished for a world that was a little less materialistic and less rushed where people cared more for each other and the environment might find that indigenous cultures have a lot to add to this country.

I would appreciate anyone who can direct me to a good source on the subject and would gratefully PM with anyone interested in thoughtful discussion - especially anyone with indigenous heritage who might have time and patience to help me understand more about indigenous cultures.
 
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I've just finished a week living and working within an indigenous community in remote NT. My time was focused purely on understanding indigenous culture by talking to local indigenous people whitefellas closely connected with the community as well as magistrates, NGOs, community leaders, social workers, rangers, retailers and others.

I went in with an open mind and am still processing my experience. I came to this thread hoping to find some discussion to help me make sense of my time in the community.

I am no tree hugging hippie and while my experience was immersive, it was also brief. Nevertheless, a couple of observations I would like to contribute to the discussion are:

First, no-one should be satisfied with the state of indigenous quality of life, which includes, on average, poorer health, education, life expectancy, crime and addiction outcomes. Also, any person who has experienced robbery, assault, offensive drunkenness, etc. has every right to be angry at the perpetrator and I understand people's frustration that, despite the investments made in indigenous people, they continue to be over indexed in criminal metrics. I would also add that the vast majority of indigenous people go through their life without being arrested or addicted and that violence, addiction and apathy are not the behaviours you expect to find amongst happy people. No-one is less happy, more angry or more frustrated with the circumstances of indigenous people than the people themselves.

Second, there are some incredibly capable people (and some less capable people too) doing amazing work within indigenous communities.

I understand why some people lament their hard earned tax dollars being pumped into indigenous welfare - not because the cause is unworthy, but because the results are often poor. While some of these dollars fund some fantastic people and programs, I found it amazing how much investment was wasted (despite good intentions) in programs, engagement and timeframes that simply would not work in the communities they were designed for.

Many welfare and community programs that might work for other parts of the community are ineffective in indigenous communities due to different fundamental values and expectations around work, relationships, property, time, family, etc. For example, in the community I visited, some well intentioned family welfare programs had quite destructive side effects.

My limited experience led me to believe that, at least in the community I visited, more understanding of indigenous cultures and more engagement in program design is far more important than more money. Unfortunately, the short term pressures of electoral cycles sometimes leads to rushed programs that don't engage the community and therefore don't achieve the results intended.

The difference between indigenous and White Aussie cultures is enormous. Apportioning blame between genocidal Europeans and recalcitrant indigenous people misses the point. Right now, Indigenous Australians are struggling to flourish in a European system because in many ways it conflicts rather than complements their culture.

NOT supporting indigenous Aussies is not going to make things better. We have to do a better job at understanding each other so the investments we make generate better results. For example, anyone who ever wished for a world that was a little less materialistic and less rushed where people cared more for each other and the environment might find that indigenous cultures have a lot to add to this country.

I would appreciate anyone who can direct me to a good source on the subject and would gratefully PM with anyone interested in thoughtful discussion - especially anyone with indigenous heritage who might have time and patience to help me understand more about indigenous cultures.
Thanks for the comment. I don't think this is the best place to get that sort of input or even "thoughtful discussion". A lot of SRP is regularly hijacked by people with political axes to grind and little desire to research.

There is a lot of hit-and-miss with NGOs and advocates, so perhaps asking the capable people you met about who they might recommend would be a good idea? Having seen their work first hand, giving them that positive feedback, and then amplifying their influence by taking on board who they recommend - all of it helps to create a better future where the more effective programmes and NGOs get recognised and preferenced.

If it's a matter of you wanting to be more locally-focussed, rather than NT-focussed, then maybe let us know where you are normally located (or PM it, if you'd prefer).
 

Bomberboyokay

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Thread starter #299
Not Kalgoorlie but something caught my attention in the news just now:

O’Donnell says: “Hindsight’s a very good thing. I believe that closing it helped to stop horrific offences against children. It probably also assisted in the slowing down of domestic violence against women.

“However, could we as a government and could we as a community have done more? Possibly.”

https://www.theguardian.com/austral...a-of-a-1926-massacre-echoes-through-the-years
Seems like a needless, racist shot. Then I remembered he's a WA Liberal so of course he said it. Was anyone charged for horrific offences against children and domestic violence in Oombulgurri?
 
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