Society/Culture Life after Covid-19

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Evolved1

Norm Smith Medallist
Jun 14, 2013
9,759
12,363
The lockdown state
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Phil Ivey
But its piss easy to work when you've got a cold. Nobody should need a day off for a cold. So no biggie if that spreads. Flu might knock you around a bit, so probably better to stay at home in that case.
Do you have any medical qualification to make that claim? When you go down with a virus, it's rare to be tested as to whether it's influenza or a cold anyway.

If a qualified medical professional tells you to take time off from work, you should heed their advice.

Your manager isn't qualified to provide opinions about your health.
 

Evolved1

Norm Smith Medallist
Jun 14, 2013
9,759
12,363
The lockdown state
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Essendon
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Phil Ivey
I for one hate having a cold, but no biggie
Sure, but stay home so you don't needlessly spread it to others at your place of work.

Those who choose to tough it out by coughing and sneezing their germs everywhere at work will carry my workload while I recover at home watching netflix, then complain for having to do my work.
 

Deliverance

Brownlow Medallist
Jun 19, 2011
15,659
24,994
MCG
AFL Club
Hawthorn
Do you have any medical qualification to make that claim? When you go down with a virus, it's rare to be tested as to whether it's influenza or a cold anyway.

If a qualified medical professional tells you to take time off from work, you should heed their advice.

Your manager isn't qualified to provide opinions about your health.
I don't need a medical qualification to know if I've got a cold or the flu. I'll just use the same symptom list that a GP would. As you said, they're not testing for it.

 

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Dogs_R_Us

Space Traveller
May 3, 2001
18,880
20,679
Sirius - the Dogstar
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
Sure, but stay home so you don't needlessly spread it to others at your place of work.

Those who choose to tough it out by coughing and sneezing their germs everywhere at work will carry my workload while I recover at home watching netflix, then complain for having to do my work.
That’s exactly what I’ve been saying.
 

sorted

Brownlow Medallist
Aug 21, 2016
11,903
14,406
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Geelong
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Australia’s former deputy chief medical officer, Dr Nick Coatsworth says we can't eradicate COVID-19 forever. We have to prepare for the next phase of the pandemic: open international borders and the return of the virus in the community.

Dr Coatsworth, in his speech on Thursday night, said Australians had to come to terms with the fact that Australia cannot ride out the COVID-19 pandemic “in an eliminationist bunker”.​
“It is clear we will not have our borders closed indefinitely. We will not have quarantine stations in perpetuity whilst we aim for the false idol of eradication,” said Dr Coatsworth, speaking in a personal capacity.​
“At a point in the future when a significant majority of our community is vaccinated, there will be pressure to open our borders. We must not resist that. In fact, when the time is right, we should be leading the calls for it.”​
The federal government has indicated international borders could be opened in the first half of 2022 when its projections suggest the majority of the population will be fully vaccinated.​

If the vaccines are as effective as we've been told, what is the argument for not going back to normal as soon as we have vaccinated our most vulnerable? Anyone who is over 50, or has a serious medical condition, or works in a high-risk industry should have had their first dose by now and their second by July. At that point we should start treating it like other seasonal respiratory viruses.
 

swingdog

Norm Smith Medallist
Aug 3, 2007
7,732
9,103
Melbourne
AFL Club
West Coast
Australia’s former deputy chief medical officer, Dr Nick Coatsworth says we can't eradicate COVID-19 forever. We have to prepare for the next phase of the pandemic: open international borders and the return of the virus in the community.

Dr Coatsworth, in his speech on Thursday night, said Australians had to come to terms with the fact that Australia cannot ride out the COVID-19 pandemic “in an eliminationist bunker”.​
“It is clear we will not have our borders closed indefinitely. We will not have quarantine stations in perpetuity whilst we aim for the false idol of eradication,” said Dr Coatsworth, speaking in a personal capacity.​
“At a point in the future when a significant majority of our community is vaccinated, there will be pressure to open our borders. We must not resist that. In fact, when the time is right, we should be leading the calls for it.”​
The federal government has indicated international borders could be opened in the first half of 2022 when its projections suggest the majority of the population will be fully vaccinated.​

If the vaccines are as effective as we've been told, what is the argument for not going back to normal as soon as we have vaccinated our most vulnerable? Anyone who is over 50, or has a serious medical condition, or works in a high-risk industry should have had their first dose by now and their second by July. At that point we should start treating it like other seasonal respiratory viruses.
Variants.
 

RobbieGray17

Brownlow Medallist
Sep 19, 2007
12,659
6,853
adelaide
AFL Club
Port Adelaide
But are any of them seriously sick or hospitalised? Or are the symptoms reduced and they are no sicker than they would be with a bad cold? Or have they simply tested positive?
My understanding early was that the vaccines were going to prevent transmission, but now learning that is not the case.
 

sorted

Brownlow Medallist
Aug 21, 2016
11,903
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Geelong
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Oldham, West Ham
My understanding early was that the vaccines were going to prevent transmission, but now learning that is not the case.
The Phase III clinical trial for the Janssen COVID-19 vaccine found efficacy against symptomatic, laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 was 66.3%. Which is not great. However vaccine efficacy for the prevention of COVID-19–associated hospitalization was high: estimated efficacy = 93.1%. There were no COVID-19–associated deaths in the vaccine group and seven in the placebo recipients. There was some weaker evidence that the vaccine inhibits transmission.


It's my understanding that seven New York Yankees staffers, plus one player tested positive - all but one of them asymptomatic and none with severe symptoms. It's a good example of how the vaccines are meant to work.

So what is the plan for how and when Australia can go back to normal?
 

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Dogs_R_Us

Space Traveller
May 3, 2001
18,880
20,679
Sirius - the Dogstar
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
My understanding early was that the vaccines were going to prevent transmission, but now learning that is not the case.
No, in one of the earliest pressers the CHO said the vac would not stop you getting covid or passing it on, it would only reduce the severity and keep you out of hospital. Hotel quarantine would continue and borders would remain closed. All of this has come to pass.
 

SaintsSeptember

Hall of Famer
Mar 19, 2008
47,961
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Narre Warren North
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.
Do you have any medical qualification to make that claim? When you go down with a virus, it's rare to be tested as to whether it's influenza or a cold anyway.

If a qualified medical professional tells you to take time off from work, you should heed their advice.

Your manager isn't qualified to provide opinions about your health.
Usually they tell you you "can take time off work "
Then there are the ones who will write you a sick certificate if you tell them you'd like to go fishing.
Doctors know whats going on and so do managers.
 

Evolved1

Norm Smith Medallist
Jun 14, 2013
9,759
12,363
The lockdown state
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Phil Ivey
Usually they tell you you "can take time off work "
Then there are the ones who will write you a sick certificate if you tell them you'd like to go fishing.
Doctors know whats going on and so do managers.
Nobody really knows what's going on in another persons life, including doctors and managers. I have no issue with people taking a day off work fishing if its good for their mental health. Happy and healthy workers are productive workers.

The sick leave system is open to abuse, but I'd rather err on the side of caution.
 

Dogs_R_Us

Space Traveller
May 3, 2001
18,880
20,679
Sirius - the Dogstar
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
Nobody really knows what's going on in another persons life, including doctors and managers. I have no issue with people taking a day off work fishing if its good for their mental health. Happy and healthy workers are productive workers.

The sick leave system is open to abuse, but I'd rather err on the side of caution.
How do you know if they are taking time off for “mental health”, or if they’re just a slacker?
 

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