Mankad: Fair game or poor form?

Mankad

  • Within the spirit - with a warning

    Votes: 61 62.9%
  • Within the spirit - without a warning

    Votes: 26 26.8%
  • Not in the spirit in any case

    Votes: 10 10.3%

  • Total voters
    97

(Log in to remove this ad.)

akkaps

Hall of Famer
Joined
Mar 20, 2012
Posts
38,072
Likes
23,551
AFL Club
Carlton
To avoid the mankad I start walking in from behind the umpire. That way I am already in stride when the bowl reaches the crease, and we pass the crease at the same time.
 
Joined
Nov 18, 2008
Posts
32,553
Likes
22,709
Location
Perth
AFL Club
West Coast
To avoid the mankad I start walking in from behind the umpire. That way I am already in stride when the bowl reaches the crease, and we pass the crease at the same time.
I just lean on my bat - if a run needs to be that quick that i have to be backing up - it isn't worth it ;)
 

hcd199

Club Legend
Joined
Apr 29, 2009
Posts
2,006
Likes
1,088
Location
Hobart
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
Waterford GAA, Glenorchy, Hob (BBL)
It's also ridiculous for the umpire to check with Matthews whether he wants to withdraw the appeal. Either we do that for every wicket or we do it for none. If a captain wants to withdraw an appeal, then he can approach the umpire himself to call the batsman back, it's not the umpire's role to check with him.
This is something I found concerning as well - it's very leading of the umpires to raise the topic of withdrawing an appeal at all, they need to remain impartial adjudicators of the laws and spirit of the game, and not, as this seems like, attempt to subdue any potential controversy. If the batsman is out under the laws, then dismiss him; if the captain withdraws the appeal before it is too late to do so, recall the batsmen: no further action is required.
 

thecatattack

Brownlow Medallist
Joined
Feb 2, 2011
Posts
11,869
Likes
7,995
Location
Hell
AFL Club
Geelong
Other Teams
Indiana Pacers, Celta Vigo, LA Rams
To avoid the mankad I start walking in from behind the umpire. That way I am already in stride when the bowl reaches the crease, and we pass the crease at the same time.
I don't understand why a player gets mankaded at an international level. You learn how to back up properly from the very start of juniors and over time it's really not hard to watch the bowler start his run up and then time your back up on that.

It really just shows the non-strikers lack of awareness when they don't back up properly.
 

SterlingArcher

Brownlow Medallist
Joined
May 16, 2014
Posts
12,058
Likes
15,434
AFL Club
Carlton
I'm all for players giving a warning. I'm not going to whinge if a bowler does it without warning, but I think it's better to do so.

If the batsman still tries to steal an extra meter or 2 advantage after the warning, then **** him, knock those bails into next year.
 

PhatBoy

Brownlow Medallist
Joined
May 5, 2016
Posts
16,174
Likes
16,680
AFL Club
Geelong
I think there’s a couple of kind of mankads - there’s the obvious one where the batsman is poaching a metre or two and that’s what prompts the dismissal, or the ‘well I can’t think of another way to get them out’ kind. Although there was a prelude to last night’s dismissal built around the former, I think it triggered in Ashwin the idea for the latter
 

(Log in to remove this ad.)

Father Jack

Brownlow Medallist
Joined
Mar 23, 2006
Posts
17,579
Likes
10,213
Location
between hope and reality
AFL Club
West Coast
Other Teams
Tottenham Hotspur FC
The only thing I haven't found a definitive answer for was whether it should have been given out or not. I heard something about when the ball should have been bowled, which makes sense, but I haven't heard anything further. If the above is legal, then you could pretty much get any batsman out that way whenever you chose.
 

Wallaby

Norm Smith Medallist
Joined
May 8, 2007
Posts
8,299
Likes
8,739
Location
vic
AFL Club
Richmond
If the above is legal, then you could pretty much get any batsman out that way whenever you chose.
I don't think so. The batsman could watch the bowler until he releases the ball - and then leave his crease. Pretty simple.

It's funny how we castigate batsmen for 'turning blind' - ie, setting off for a run without checking whether the fielder has gathered, released or fumbled the ball. But we let them off for guessing when or if the bowler releases the ball - while bowling.

I wouldn't object to seeing one or two mankads in a series. Keep the batsmen on their toes. The ball is live from the moment the bowler begins his runup.
 

Zach Package

Kyle Langfourd
Joined
Sep 21, 2012
Posts
23,603
Likes
31,806
Location
Parish, Francis
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Piggy Smith, SFG, Heat, Raiders
Not sure exactly how it’s been worded but it’s something about Buttler having reasonable expectations that the ball would be bowled, which he absolutely would have given Ashwin stopped, looked at him and watched him take a stride after the time he normally would have let it go.

Buttler wasn’t trying to take ground
 

SterlingArcher

Brownlow Medallist
Joined
May 16, 2014
Posts
12,058
Likes
15,434
AFL Club
Carlton
FFS.

It's within the rules. This one was only arguably in the rules but still. If it's so “against the spirit of the game”, ******* ban it. In competitive elite sport I say there are no `moral` areas. It's either legal or illegal.

From Doping, to racism, multiple beamers, chucking etc. All illegal.

Mankad, legal.

Distinct difference. (The 3rd ump ruled this one as legal which is the decision I`m going with).
 

Woody15

Club Legend
Joined
Apr 22, 2010
Posts
2,779
Likes
3,292
Location
Somewhere
AFL Club
Collingwood
Obviously the rule is to prevent non-strikers from running down the wicket and getting a head start which Buttler was certainly not doing. Had Ashwin actually landed his front foot on the bowling crease and delivered the ball instead of stopping and waiting for Buttler to wander a foot outside his crease, Buttler would still have had his bat grounded. He wasn't trying to get a head start or a great advantage, merely walking down with the bowler.

Poor IMO. In the rules yes, but appears to be a desperate attempt to get a batsman out who was playing really well.

If Australia dont win the World Cup, my next hope is England v India final, and the same thing happens to either Kohli or Ashwin. That would be incredibly, incredibly satisfying.
 

Woody15

Club Legend
Joined
Apr 22, 2010
Posts
2,779
Likes
3,292
Location
Somewhere
AFL Club
Collingwood
It's not poor if it's in the rules.

Runners in baseball test the pitchers and vice versa often.
Im saying I dont like the rule/interpretation of the rule. Just like I dont like the below the knees rule, the 50m rule interpretation in its current state in the AFL etc.

Depends on who you ask with regards to the rule and whether it was actually the correct decision. “the instant when the bowler would normally have been expected to release the ball” - I think you could mount a strong argument that Buttler was doing this.

Obviously there has to be some rule regarding backing up, but do we really want to see mankads becoming a regular way to dismiss a batsman? Do we really want to see play held up all the time because mankads are now widely practiced?

Runners in baseball are tested frequently due to the regular stolen bases. Lets not pretend you see players trying to steal runs all the time. If you know they are going to try steal a single towards the end of an innings, you could maybe mount an argument. But as far as I'm concerned, its a cheap way to get a batsman out. He wasnt trying to gain a significant advantage.
 

eddiesmith

Hall of Famer
Joined
Jul 12, 2004
Posts
46,453
Likes
4,565
Location
Junktion Oval
AFL Club
Collingwood
Other Teams
England Cronulla
I thought the rule centred around the delivery stride, that they can't mankad them once they've entered their delivery stride? In Krams picture above, Ashwin clearly has

But given the IPL is a nothing tournament, who really cares?
 

Richard Pryor

Norm Smith Medallist
Joined
Feb 6, 2013
Posts
7,103
Likes
8,955
AFL Club
Hawthorn
I don't understand why a player gets mankaded at an international level. You learn how to back up properly from the very start of juniors and over time it's really not hard to watch the bowler start his run up and then time your back up on that.

It really just shows the non-strikers lack of awareness when they don't back up properly.
It's worth a shot in international cricket because chances are the bowler isn't going to want to deal with the media circus of actually mankading the batsman (also Buttler funnily enough) so they can do whatever they want. (See that SL v ENG game where the batsman was warned multiple times and then mankaded and Cook still brought up "Spirit of the Game" BS in his press conference).
 
Last edited:

frankrizzo

Norm Smith Medallist
Joined
Jan 6, 2004
Posts
7,955
Likes
5,240
Location
jfgjgfj
The mankad dismissal being a dirty way of getting somebody out was from a past era when batsmen rarely looked for such an obvious advantage but as i see it now batsman who leave the crease every second ball looking for a quick single or easier two are the unsporting ones and it ridiculous that punishing them is seen as the unforgivable act, 20/20 has changed the sport and how batsmen approach running so mankad should be a normal part of the game or at least in the white ball versions.
 

Richard Pryor

Norm Smith Medallist
Joined
Feb 6, 2013
Posts
7,103
Likes
8,955
AFL Club
Hawthorn
Obviously there has to be some rule regarding backing up, but do we really want to see mankads becoming a regular way to dismiss a batsman? Do we really want to see play held up all the time because mankads are now widely practiced?
Disagree play would be held up, at least in the long run. Remove the stigma and batsmen will stop trying to pinch runs quick smart.

Although an argument against it would be that it would make spinners overpowered, as batsmen would be really ginger about taking singles thereby keeping the striker at the bowlers mercy for longer.
 

akkaps

Hall of Famer
Joined
Mar 20, 2012
Posts
38,072
Likes
23,551
AFL Club
Carlton
Obviously the rule is to prevent non-strikers from running down the wicket and getting a head start which Buttler was certainly not doing. Had Ashwin actually landed his front foot on the bowling crease and delivered the ball instead of stopping and waiting for Buttler to wander a foot outside his crease, Buttler would still have had his bat grounded. He wasn't trying to get a head start or a great advantage, merely walking down with the bowler.

Poor IMO. In the rules yes, but appears to be a desperate attempt to get a batsman out who was playing really well.

If Australia dont win the World Cup, my next hope is England v India final, and the same thing happens to either Kohli or Ashwin. That would be incredibly, incredibly satisfying.
Any movement past the popping crease before the bowler has bowled is a head start. It's making the distance from non-striker to the batting crease shorter, intent or not. What's to stop the non-striker starting half way down the pitch then?
If you want to walk in with the bowler, start with the ump, and make sure you cross the popping creasing as the bowler moves is arm over.
 
Top Bottom