Movie Movies based on true events v the actual true story

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Shell

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Jul 2, 2005
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And I think this is another factor in why it doesn't work on any level for a blockbuster film. It's a complex issue with nuance, which I don't think King was really interested in exploring instead using it just for shock value in the original book, which seems more geared towards titillation narratively which is something which will primarily appeal to perverts. I wouldn't be in favor of the government censoring a film which did do that on principle but I would be very surprised if it would do any good.

To bring it back on topic! Has anyone seen Great Balls of Fire starring Dennis Quaid as Jerry Lee Lewis? Such a weird film which I can't believe exists. Depicts the story of Lewis marrying his THIRTEEN year old cousin with a surprisingly sympathetic tone which mythologizes Lewis as a rock god and rebel. Very awkward to watch and I'm surprised it wasn't more controversial (wasn't around when it came out but haven't really heard about it causing any waves reading up on it).
This was this great bio on SBS... dramatization- about.. "Coals Miners Daughter" my dad just jogged my memory.

She was underage.. and was raped as her first time by Tommy Lee Jones.


Was disgusting.. i wasnt watching, i was in the kitchen eating a snack, my mum and dad were watching it
 

Shell

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Jul 2, 2005
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In 1945, 13-year-old Loretta Webb is one of eight children of Ted Webb, a Van Lear coal miner raising a family with his wife in the midst of grinding poverty in Butcher Hollow, Kentucky (pronounced by locals as "Butcher Holler").

In 1948, at the age of 15, Loretta marries 22-year-old Oliver "Mooney" (aka Doo, short for Doolittle) Lynn, becoming a mother of four by the time she is 19. The family moves to northern Washington State, where Doo works in the forest industry and Loretta sings occasionally at local honky-tonks on weekends. After some time, Loretta makes an occasional appearance on local radio.

By the time Loretta turns 25, Norm Burley, the owner of Zero Records, a small Canadian record label, hears Loretta sing during one of her early radio appearances. Burley gives the couple the money needed to travel to Los Angeles to cut a demo tape from which her first single, "I'm a Honky Tonk Girl," is made. After returning home from the sessions, Doo suggests he and Loretta go on a promotional tour to push the record. Doo shoots his own publicity photo for Loretta, and spends many late nights writing letters to show promoters and to radio disc jockeys all over the South. After Loretta receives an emergency phone call from her mother telling her that her father had died, she and Doo hit the road with records, photos, and their children. The two embark on an extensive promotional tour of radio stations across the South.




So weird. No mention of the rape. Or the underage marriage. Like it says her age and thats it.
 

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