Perth Stadium (Optus Stadium)

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As a thought experiment, if Perth was to host the AFL grand final, you could probably do a sneaky and increase the capacity by about a further 3,000 seats with minimal effort.

The bump in seats for rectangle sports could be used on the outer wing and at one goals end.

It would reduce the field size to about 155m long by 120m wide, which is still the same length as the SCG, and still wider than Kadinia Park.

If the normal capacity is 61,266, it would increase the stadium capacity to about 64,000... it would be cool if that was to be employed one day.
 

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Patrons on the Mandurah Line south of Murdoch Station will have direct access to Optus Stadium when the Thornlie-Cockburn Rail-link is built and opened. It means they will no longer have to transfer at Perth, but will instead get Event Special Services like there is on the Joondalup and Fremantle Lines.


The works at Stadium Station will comprise of:

• extending the existing Platform 5 at the southern (Victoria Park) end, to create the terminating platform for the Thornlie-Cockburn Link
• installing platform cover and safety fencing
• providing additional stowing capacity for trains
• installing associated services, including electrical, operations technology, security, signage and wayfinding.
 
Since Optus got built, I’ve been intrigued as to how it is meant to be expanded from 60,000 to 70,000 in AFL format.

I’ve seen images that show the extra seats are meant to come from adding rows to the back of level 5 within the existing facade.

But how easy can that be done? How does that structurally work?

Here is a panorama from the third last row on level 5 next to the video screen. A photo from the last two rows result in the skyline being blocked by the horizontal beam.

8A7582FF-14C9-40F6-B669-A0CF5B869CB4.jpeg

You can see there is a bit of vertical distance between the last row and the roof, from this photo from the wing.

02EFE9A1-2C0A-49A9-83B0-DB6D98ED256A.jpeg

So this is my guess. The red line is a bad attempt at drawing a straight line, which shows how those half high posts that don’t connect to the roof, line up with the staircases between the blocks.

The green lines show steel beams that would connect from the existing rows of seats up to those half high posts, essentially forming triangles.

The purple lines are what I would presume become the new rows of seating, with access only possible from the staircase in the centre of the triangle.

And the yellow squiggles are where there would be open gaps, because any seats in those areas would beview restricted by the roof trusses.

932B2738-0DB7-47A7-80B1-22048B0C6FBC.jpeg

Anyway, I would love to know how it is really meant to happen.
 
Since Optus got built, I’ve been intrigued as to how it is meant to be expanded from 60,000 to 70,000 in AFL format.

I’ve seen images that show the extra seats are meant to come from adding rows to the back of level 5 within the existing facade.

But how easy can that be done? How does that structurally work?

Here is a panorama from the third last row on level 5 next to the video screen. A photo from the last two rows result in the skyline being blocked by the horizontal beam.

View attachment 1153269

You can see there is a bit of vertical distance between the last row and the roof, from this photo from the wing.

View attachment 1153270

So this is my guess. The red line is a bad attempt at drawing a straight line, which shows how those half high posts that don’t connect to the roof, line up with the staircases between the blocks.

The green lines show steel beams that would connect from the existing rows of seats up to those half high posts, essentially forming triangles.

The purple lines are what I would presume become the new rows of seating, with access only possible from the staircase in the centre of the triangle.

And the yellow squiggles are where there would be open gaps, because any seats in those areas would beview restricted by the roof trusses.

View attachment 1153289

Anyway, I would love to know how it is really meant to happen.
Should’ve been 80-100,000 from the beginning but like the freeway it’ll forever be a money pit that we keep pouring our taxes into yet never even gets up to date let alone finished.
 
Is it just me or is there only one beer available now at AFL matches? We used to get two but last game I went to I wondered around and it was all the same (the crappiest of the two mid strengths - Alby?). I can go to the captain's club but it's a hike...
 

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Should’ve been 80-100,000 from the beginning but like the freeway it’ll forever be a money pit that we keep pouring our taxes into yet never even gets up to date let alone finished.
For our population the capacity is fine.

Just be thankful we aren't like the Eastern States with road tolls which can be pretty hefty. Our roads are a great standard and none are privately funded...yet, thank ****. The Tonkin Hwy upgrades have been brilliant and it's basically another freeway now.
 
For our population the capacity is fine.
It’s fine now but in ten to twenty years time? By the time they get around to deciding on it will be too late and by the time they actually get to working on it will be another decade too late.

It’s only assumption of course but our governments have a fairly solid track record of missing the boat when moving forward on things like this.
 
Is it just me or is there only one beer available now at AFL matches? We used to get two but last game I went to I wondered around and it was all the same (the crappiest of the two mid strengths - Alby?). I can go to the captain's club but it's a hike...
I can only speak for the Camfield side wing, level 1 and level 5. The small bars and small bars/food stands typically only have one beer on tap. It used to be either Alby or Single Fin, but there has been Coastal Lager this year. The Alby Bar near Gate D on level 1 has at least four beers; Atomic Pale Ale, Coastal Lager, the XPA and Single Fin (from memory). Same for the big bar on level 5 - at least 4 beers on tap, but the small bars either side only have one beer.
 
It’s fine now but in ten to twenty years time? By the time they get around to deciding on it will be too late and by the time they actually get to working on it will be another decade too late.

It’s only assumption of course but our governments have a fairly solid track record of missing the boat when moving forward on things like this.
You want to pay for the extra maintenance of large parts of a stadium that would almost never be used for another 20 years? That would further ruin the feel of the venue for smaller crowds?

60k is fine for a long time.
 
It’s fine now but in ten to twenty years time? By the time they get around to deciding on it will be too late and by the time they actually get to working on it will be another decade too late.

It’s only assumption of course but our governments have a fairly solid track record of missing the boat when moving forward on things like this.
Fremantle only average ~40k. Scorchers stopped pulling a crowd when they stopped winning. International cricket will only get 60k for day 1 of the Ashes. None of this is going to change in the medium term. To build a bigger stadium for one tenant is ludicrous.
 
Since Optus got built, I’ve been intrigued as to how it is meant to be expanded from 60,000 to 70,000 in AFL format.

I’ve seen images that show the extra seats are meant to come from adding rows to the back of level 5 within the existing facade.

But how easy can that be done? How does that structurally work?

Here is a panorama from the third last row on level 5 next to the video screen. A photo from the last two rows result in the skyline being blocked by the horizontal beam.

View attachment 1153269

You can see there is a bit of vertical distance between the last row and the roof, from this photo from the wing.

View attachment 1153270

So this is my guess. The red line is a bad attempt at drawing a straight line, which shows how those half high posts that don’t connect to the roof, line up with the staircases between the blocks.

The green lines show steel beams that would connect from the existing rows of seats up to those half high posts, essentially forming triangles.

The purple lines are what I would presume become the new rows of seating, with access only possible from the staircase in the centre of the triangle.

And the yellow squiggles are where there would be open gaps, because any seats in those areas would beview restricted by the roof trusses.

View attachment 1153289

Anyway, I would love to know how it is really meant to happen.

The roof goes up .All the handles get wound at the same time and it rises and the next level of seating goes in.OR ! cranes are used to lift the roof in sections that are disconected from each other and the next level of seating goes in and the roof goes back on.
20210530_192712.jpg
 
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We have the third biggest stadium in the country for the fourth biggest city. Perth isn't the third biggest sporting market although is that debatable now? We've shown up the bigger cities by pulling bigger rugby crowds than Brisbane and Melbourne for both Bledisloe(61,241) and SOO(59,721). Optus was only about 5K less than what Sydney had for their last non restricted crowd for the Bledisloe Cup in 2018.

In rectangular format remember Optus has the capacity for 65K so 75K with the expansion.
 
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Football Park (AAMI Stadium) was originally meant to hold over 70k but they stopped with just the members stand. Always talked about extending it but just did little bits at a time. Now its gone and one day everything else will be too. Time stops for no stadia.

On SM-G925I using BigFooty.com mobile app
 
We have the third biggest stadium in the country for the fourth biggest city. Perth isn't the third biggest sporting market although is that debatable now? We've shown up the bigger cities by pulling bigger rugby crowds than Brisbane and Melbourne for both Bledisloe(61,241) and SOO(59,721).

Perth is good at event crowds. Usually the conditions are good and the stadium is good.
People are forever forgetting that event crowds are just that - one offs.
Talk of "live sporting market" makes no practical sense.
Bring one elite team to Perth and that will bring a response, but repeat it too soon afterwards and the opposite will occur.
 
Perth is good at event crowds. Usually the conditions are good and the stadium is good.
People are forever forgetting that event crowds are just that - one offs.
Talk of "live sporting market" makes no practical sense.
Bring one elite team to Perth and that will bring a response, but repeat it too soon afterwards and the opposite will occur.

Theatre goers used to be the term - Origin, Bledisloe, Boxing day, ANZAC Day, the Grand Finals (AFL & NRL), Socceroos games..its about the event and the atmosphere, not so much the sport.
 
Theatre goers used to be the term - Origin, Bledisloe, Boxing day, ANZAC Day, the Grand Finals (AFL & NRL), Socceroos games..its about the event and the atmosphere, not so much the sport.

The "dreamtime" at Optus was promoted as an event not just an AFL game and not restricted to an AFL game.
I'm sure an NFL game would be successful too but there's no way Perth could support an NFL team
but that doesn't prevent people from reading too much into these events.
 

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