Private Dicks, dames and double-crosses: the crime fiction thread

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Mr Shankly

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Reckon there's a whole genre that could be defined as dirt poor southern white trash meth noir.
Indeed. The writer Daniel Woodrell termed it 'country noir'. The film, Winter's Bone, was based on his book. An excellent read, and I've got his Bayou Trilogy next up on my digital shelf. I'll track down this Frank Bill collection on your recommendation.

Just finished this wonderfully depraved debut novel by Jake Hinkson (gonna search out and devour everything he's written) which contains one of the more memorable characters of recent reads, Brother Geoffrey Webb. A con man who sees the church as a sham, and himself as a natural fit for the environment. He's appointed youth minister in a small Arkansas Baptist church and the mayhem begins. Read it in a single sitting, highly recommended for those that like their crime real hard boiled
I love the cover of the Hinkson book, and that's one hell of a quote invoking two all-timers in Thompson and Willeford. Another one to track down.

Earlier in this thread you recommended David Goodis, and I finally got around to reading Street Of No Return. Good book. Down There is next. I've also picked up some books by W.R. Burnett, George V. Higgins, and Dorothy B. Hughes because the films that have been adapted from their novels - High Sierra, The Asphalt Jungle, The Friends of Eddie Coyle, In A Lonely Place - are some of my favourite films noir.
 

CLUBMEDhurst

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Aaah yeah, just remembered Jim Thompson is also pretty damned good.
Pretty damned good!!!

THE best!!!

Indeed. The writer Daniel Woodrell termed it 'country noir'. The film, Winter's Bone, was based on his book. An excellent read, and I've got his Bayou Trilogy next up on my digital shelf. I'll track down this Frank Bill collection on your recommendation..
Yeah, Woodrell is the master of the genre (Winter's Bone was his best in my opinion and J-Law's performance in the movie was oscar worthy). The Bayou Trilogy is a definite must read, including one of my favourite characters, John X. Shade. If you've enjoyed huis other work, you're in for a real treat.




I love the cover of the Hinkson book, and that's one hell of a quote invoking two all-timers in Thompson and Willeford. Another one to track down.
From a publisher New Pulp Press, which looks like they have some interesting talent on their roster

http://www.newpulppress.com/



Earlier in this thread you recommended David Goodis, and I finally got around to reading Street Of No Return. Good book. Down There is next. I've also picked up some books by W.R. Burnett, George V. Higgins, and Dorothy B. Hughes because the films that have been adapted from their novels - High Sierra, The Asphalt Jungle, The Friends of Eddie Coyle, In A Lonely Place - are some of my favourite films noir.
Are you sure we weren't separated at birth? Those are some of my favourite movies (In A Lonely Place is my favourite Bogart movie, the smokin' hot Gloria Grahame the cream on top). I've only read Little Caesar from Burnett (many years ago now) but I might check out some more of his stuff.

The Friends of Eddie Coyle's in my top 5 reads of all time, and is one of the few film adaptations that could match the novel (a tour de force from the king of noir, Bob Mitchum and Peter Boyle in his best role as the duplicitous Dillon). Have you read any Higgins? Very dialogue heavy, however that's the strength of his writing, setting up plot through conversation (and his dialogue's amazing, apparently nailing the difficult Boston dialect). Cogan's Trade (filmed as Killing Them Softly) is also a top read
 
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Mr Shankly

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Are you sure we weren't separated at birth? Those are some of my favourite movies (In A Lonely Place is my favourite Bogart movie, the smokin' hot Gloria Grahame the cream on top).
Haha, starting to seem like it. In A Lonely Place is stunning, isn't it? It's probably Bogart's best performance, and his chemistry with Grahame burns up the screen. Incidentally it's one of several excellent noirs directed by Nicholas Ray (Grahame's husband at the time), the other notables being They Live By Night and On Dangerous Ground. They're definitely worth seeing if you haven't already.

The Friends of Eddie Coyle's in my top 5 reads of all time, and is one of the few film adaptations that could match the novel (a tour de force from the king of noir, Bob Mitchum and Peter Boyle in his best role as the duplicitous Dillon). Have you read any Higgins?
I've not read any Higgins, but I'm looking forward to it. The film adaptation of The Friends of Eddie Coyle is one of those great gritty, low key 70s neo-noirs. If the book is anywhere near as good - and judging by your opinion and its reputation, it will be - then I'm in for a real treat.
 

sydney eagle

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have read Michael Connelly, All the Agatha Christies, . Heard good recommendations for Geoffrey Deaver books, so am looking out for them , Ruth Rendell, Ngaio Marsh ( probably for the ladies ). Wasn't real keen on Kerry Greenwood .
Have you tried the McDonalds ? Both John D's "Travis Magee" novels and Ross' "Archer" are worth a look.
 

GreyCrow

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Have read most of those already mentioned

Connelly - very good
Coben - Myron Bolitar
Rankin - really good

Etc

I have dipped in and out of Michael Robotham - an Aussie living in the UK
2 recent books have had me searching once more for others

One is part of the Joe O'Loughlin series ''Say You're Sorry'' and another is ''Good Girl , Bad Girl''

Good Girl Bad Girl is well done and makes me want more and hope its a series

Say You're Sorry affected me like no other book in recent times. Dreams/nightmares/night wake ups. Then the last few chapters were as powerful and intense that I have read. The last chapter I shed a tear

Thats a sign of powerful writing when that happens
 

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