Society/Culture Progressives, what is the most conservative belief you hold? And vice-versa for conservatives?

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Jul 5, 2011
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I'll start by acknowledging that progressive vs conservative and left v right are over-simplifications and not everyone will even agree on what those terms mean.

Having said that, if you are someone who generally backs one side of politics (which seems to be the vast majority of posters here), what is one issue that you find yourself actually agreeing with the other side on?

An example would be nuclear power, which was briefly discussed in the Trump thread earlier. A colleague of mine (who identifies as left wing) stated last week that they support nuclear power and denied that it was a partisan issue. They were surprised when I pointed out that the Greens parties of several countries are completely against the idea.

On the other hand, a RW uncle of mine was passionate about allowing same sex marriage in Australia. He couldn't get his head around the idea that anyone would oppose such a thing. He also believes that we should a better safety net in terms of welfare here, despite broadly being against improving the rights of workers vs employers.

An American acquaintance of mine votes Greens or Democrat but admits that they agree with Republicans in terms of the 2nd Amendment and gun laws.

Do you have any individual beliefs that run counter to the "side" or political party that you generally support? With broken clocks being right twice a day, are there any policies from the other side that you are partial to?
 
Once upon a time, the preservation of democratic (political and judicial) institutions would have been seen as a conservative viewpoint. Whether it still is, it is a viewpoint I believe in.
Economic prosperity allows society to function well.
We need a strong, effective military in Australia.
'The market' does actually provide solutions to many problems policy makers can't or won't solve.
 

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We need a strong, effective military in Australia.
'The market' does actually provide solutions to many problems policy makers can't or won't solve.

These are my two as well.

There also are not enough services for men (legal aid in Family Court, support services, family violence services and so forth). I feel we would wind up with much better outcomes for families, women and for men, if blokes were given more support in those areas.

And that's not from a MRA activist position either. I've seen first-hand what timely advice around restraining orders and the Family Court can do for blokes, and it leads to better outcomes for all parties (including the wife, and especially the kids).

Finally, sentencing for murder is a bit of a joke in this country. I'm talking willful murder (as opposed to manslaughter, or 'heat of the moment' type stuff). AFAIAC, if you deliberately plan to kill someone, go to their house, and neck them, your sentence should start at a whole life order (and then you get to argue parole, or walk it back).
 
Finally, sentencing for murder is a bit of a joke in this country. I'm talking willful murder (as opposed to manslaughter, or 'heat of the moment' type stuff). AFAIAC, if you deliberately plan to kill someone, go to their house, and neck them, your sentence should start at a whole life order (and then you get to argue parole, or walk it back).
Agree with this. Know a few murder cases that involved people I know (neither victim nor murderer but related to one or the other) where the murderer basically got away with it.
 
[centre-left]

The use of non-binary pronouns, such as "they/them," aims to promote inclusivity, but it might unintentionally contribute to the persistence of gender roles and stereotypes in our evolving society. Transgender individuals often identify with their transitioning biological gender, which suggests that a more streamlined approach to gender pronouns could be beneficial for everyone. By focusing on each person's unique qualities and experiences, rather than solely on their gender pronouns, we can foster a more inclusive and equal society that respects and values everyone's identity.

I'm of course ignorant to this subject as a straight male, but it doesn't make sense to me that Darcy Vescio can play in the AFLW when they don't identify as a woman. And another thing - had it not been for their pronoun reveal would they be on the cover of AFL23?
 
I believe Australia should have a strong independent military with as little reliance on international supply chains as possible. We also need our own nuclear deterrent to maintain our independent course.

I agree with this, I'm probably closer to conservative than you it seems. But of course, I mean you need to give a direct deterrent to nefarious types which would be a strong defence capability.
 

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As a British citizen I have a problem with the national anthem being about a fictional sky ghost saving the head of a family that has inherited rights to be head of state. A national anthem should be about the country and the people not the monarch.
 
I think the union movement was a necessary evil in a modern industrial society and its destruction has in part led to much of the social degeneracy conservatives gripe over in the culture war. Modern day unions are a sad joke.
 
As much as it's always struck me as weird that conservatives have claimed the family as one of their core values, it's one I share. The difference probably being that they see the primacy of a biological family, I equate what Maupin calls your logical family which are the people you chose to have close to you as equal.
 
As much as it's always struck me as weird that conservatives have claimed the family as one of their core values, it's one I share. The difference probably being that they see the primacy of a biological family, I equate what Maupin calls your logical family which are the people you chose to have close to you as equal.
The latter is not a real family.
 
As much as it's always struck me as weird that conservatives have claimed the family as one of their core values, it's one I share. The difference probably being that they see the primacy of a biological family, I equate what Maupin calls your logical family which are the people you chose to have close to you as equal.
I agree that it is ideal to be part of a loving and supportive family, whether they are biologically family or not.

In the US republicans will criticise the amount of fatherless homes in the black community, yet support measures that make these stats worse (eg disproportionately locking up black men for non-violent drug crimes).
Isn't this thread just a reflection that political beliefs are on a spectrum and largely differ from subject to subject?

If people stopped 'supporting' their favourite political party and addressed each topic on its merits we'd probably all be better off
I fully agree and was hoping that this thread could prove that most of us are not as different from one another or as "divided" as we thought we were on many issues.
 
I have balanced views in some areas but I guess the Left/progressive thing I struggle with the most is identity politics / critical theory. I find it dehumanising and actually kind of in opposition to the notions of "all in it together / greater good".
I get that it's complicated, and understand the concept of structural privilege, but these days the way it's being "sold" leaves a bad taste in my mouth.
 

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