Public vs Private Schools

quotemokc

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Lets say primary school teachers, keep in mind this is from 2013 so the numbers currently would be higher.


The Australian Education Union has a great document outlining what different state governments pay their teachers. Queensland’s 2013 public school graduate teachers started at $58,437, and its most experienced senior teachers will this year earn $85,557. In NSW, graduates are on $59,706, while top teachers earn $89,050. The Northern Territory offers $62,017 to graduates and $114,737 to specialist teachers (top standard classroom teachers earn a maximum of $88,941). The ACT pays $58,041 to its grads and $86,881 to its top teachers. South Australian teachers start on $59,629 and earn up to $85,999, although additional training can bump that up to $89,201. Down in Tasmania, graduates earn $57,565, with the highest paid teachers on $84,184. In Victoria, graduates this year started on $60,220, and top “leading teachers” earn $94,408. The latest Victorian pay agreement will result in teachers earning an extra 16.1% to 20.5% over three years.
 

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South of the Yarra

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Lets say primary school teachers, keep in mind this is from 2013 so the numbers currently would be higher.


The Australian Education Union has a great document outlining what different state governments pay their teachers. Queensland’s 2013 public school graduate teachers started at $58,437, and its most experienced senior teachers will this year earn $85,557. In NSW, graduates are on $59,706, while top teachers earn $89,050. The Northern Territory offers $62,017 to graduates and $114,737 to specialist teachers (top standard classroom teachers earn a maximum of $88,941). The ACT pays $58,041 to its grads and $86,881 to its top teachers. South Australian teachers start on $59,629 and earn up to $85,999, although additional training can bump that up to $89,201. Down in Tasmania, graduates earn $57,565, with the highest paid teachers on $84,184. In Victoria, graduates this year started on $60,220, and top “leading teachers” earn $94,408. The latest Victorian pay agreement will result in teachers earning an extra 16.1% to 20.5% over three years.
Appalling in comparison to Private schools.
 

Maylandsman

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If you think that everyone gets a scholarship or you can just go to these private schools on a whim you are having a laugh. I’m a good footballer...welcome to elitism.
 

NetworkNerd

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AFL Member so all clubs I guess.
Lets say primary school teachers, keep in mind this is from 2013 so the numbers currently would be higher.


The Australian Education Union has a great document outlining what different state governments pay their teachers. Queensland’s 2013 public school graduate teachers started at $58,437, and its most experienced senior teachers will this year earn $85,557. In NSW, graduates are on $59,706, while top teachers earn $89,050. The Northern Territory offers $62,017 to graduates and $114,737 to specialist teachers (top standard classroom teachers earn a maximum of $88,941). The ACT pays $58,041 to its grads and $86,881 to its top teachers. South Australian teachers start on $59,629 and earn up to $85,999, although additional training can bump that up to $89,201. Down in Tasmania, graduates earn $57,565, with the highest paid teachers on $84,184. In Victoria, graduates this year started on $60,220, and top “leading teachers” earn $94,408. The latest Victorian pay agreement will result in teachers earning an extra 16.1% to 20.5% over three years.
That really isn't much compared to say a tram/train driver or the construction worker that holds a stop sign.

Average wage in Australia is 86K so the top performing teachers are barely above average earners.
 

AuntyBlindEye

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I went to both at various points in my schooling.

I can't speak for all public or all private, but in my experience (not just regarding footy) the teacher at public schools seemed to care more about teaching the kids, but I found the curriculum at private schools to be more comprehensive. When I went from a private school to a public one, I found certain subjects appeared to be teaching things I had learnt the year or two before, but they seemed more committed to try and teach despite some fairly disrespectful students.

I think if you want to learn, then either will work you have to put in the effort.

In regards to footy though, I don't think I've ever heard of a public school handing out footy scholarships.
 

deltablues

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Good private schools are pre screeners of cultural capital. With the extra resources they pay for better edu resources. Endless cycle. Fortunately for the bedraggled there is either religion like the predominant Jewish sect in Oz, or dependence on substances, or daydreaming on the surface of life, or escapism into personal satiation, or in the rarest instance, the train driver becomes font head of wisdom and crushes, however temporarily, the cultural capitalists. It is this outlier that makes it all worthwhile.
Indeed. A last bastion against the zeitgeist and its war on Western Christian culture, with consequential deracinated anomie and nihilism.

We rowers always understood this ;)
 

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South of the Yarra

Norm Smith Medallist
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Compared to doctors, lawyers, vets, scientists, engineers, accountants, etc. Yes.

The grades and requirements are very low. Teaching is not taxing on the mind. Its taxing on the ability to not punch whiny little smart arses in the chops.
4 years training is a fair amount I would imagine and I would suggest teaching is incredibly mentally taxing especially at Primary level.
 

Taylor

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Judging, key word, by the contents of my facebook feed there is not a requirement that someone be literate to be a primary school teacher.

I don't think teaching is mentally taxing. I do think it would be stressful.

Mostly because the cause of your greatest issues will be picking up the phone to give you a spray because you dared impose a boundary on their child during the course of teaching the alphabet.

There isn't much taught at primary school that is important that isn't taught at home, and if it's not, your fault.
 

Mister M

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Compared to doctors, lawyers, vets, scientists, engineers, accountants, etc. Yes.

The grades and requirements are very low. Teaching is not taxing on the mind. Its taxing on the ability to not punch whiny little smart arses in the chops.
Graduate accounts only require 3 years of study; much of which is now group work at university level and you can get through subjects without even a full grasp of the English language.

Where as Graduate teachers require 4 years of study AND to pass LANTITE (literacy & numeracy standard) Tests.
 

quotemokc

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That really isn't much compared to say a tram/train driver or the construction worker that holds a stop sign.

Average wage in Australia is 86K so the top performing teachers are barely above average earners.
It is plenty considering they get more holidays, their job is pretty secure with a low risk of being fired and not overly reliant on the economy or current projects to find work and it is low risk work with practically 0 chance of dying on the job.

Soldiers and cops make less than teachers, thats just how it is.

Teachers make the decision to enter that profession knowing full well what their salary is likely to be.
 

HavUEvaSeenTheRain

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Starting salaries for relatively untrained work are very high. The problem is there are no significant salary bumps for ability and effort and the best money comes when you move in to administration and become a principal.
Depends. It seems the very best secondary teachers are often head hunted by private schools on much better wages.
 

Hoops

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It is plenty considering they get more holidays, their job is pretty secure with a low risk of being fired and not overly reliant on the economy or current projects to find work and it is low risk work with practically 0 chance of dying on the job.

Soldiers and cops make less than teachers, thats just how it is.

Teachers make the decision to enter that profession knowing full well what their salary is likely to be.
Obviously have no idea. most teachers are on short term contracts and have to keep reapplying for their jobs. They get slightly more holidays a year than police and on average less money
 

Occidental

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Lets say primary school teachers, keep in mind this is from 2013 so the numbers currently would be higher.


The Australian Education Union has a great document outlining what different state governments pay their teachers. Queensland’s 2013 public school graduate teachers started at $58,437, and its most experienced senior teachers will this year earn $85,557. In NSW, graduates are on $59,706, while top teachers earn $89,050. The Northern Territory offers $62,017 to graduates and $114,737 to specialist teachers (top standard classroom teachers earn a maximum of $88,941). The ACT pays $58,041 to its grads and $86,881 to its top teachers. South Australian teachers start on $59,629 and earn up to $85,999, although additional training can bump that up to $89,201. Down in Tasmania, graduates earn $57,565, with the highest paid teachers on $84,184. In Victoria, graduates this year started on $60,220, and top “leading teachers” earn $94,408. The latest Victorian pay agreement will result in teachers earning an extra 16.1% to 20.5% over three years.
In Victoria 2019, the current entry Graduate Teacher salary at Level 1.1 is $69,772.
It rises in roughly $3,000 annual increments for 10 years up to $106,146.
Seek promotion and the numbers are related to size of the school. Lowest level Assistant Principal (small school) gets $125K, highest (at a huge school) is on $178K.
Get to Principal and lowest is $141K and highest $215K. Again based on enrolment numbers.
 

master bate

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In Victoria 2019, the current entry Graduate Teacher salary at Level 1.1 is $69,772.
It rises in roughly $3,000 annual increments for 10 years up to $106,146.
Seek promotion and the numbers are related to size of the school. Lowest level Assistant Principal (small school) gets $125K, highest (at a huge school) is on $178K.
Get to Principal and lowest is $141K and highest $215K. Again based on enrolment numbers.
That would be excellent money if.........

Just a decent house in a respectable suburb didn't cost well over 1 Million and private/catholic education at a half decent school wasn't at least 10k pa per child. Or you can move in to a top secondary school area if you can afford to live there - get a 2mil house in the Camberwell/Balwyn/McKinnon/Mount Waverly catchment. Add in the cost of basic necessities if you have kids like childcare, the dentist, clothing, food etc and people are going to push for more money.

The reality is we've cooked our society to the stage where private education and private health (and private tutors and private tennis lessons and private gold clubs and private etc etc) are the way to go and everyone's chasing the cash to make it work.

I don't mean to be disrespectful to tradies because they deserve it but they are pulling ahead of teachers and nurses even if they are giving up plenty for the chance to do it (fly in fly out, weekends, major projects etc).

All because everyone is chasing the money available in business and competing with those who have money from inheritance, overseas cash etc. So many jobs in finance and pencil pushing executives in big businesses that contribute nothing of value to society.
 

master bate

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As for public v private for AFL draft picks.

I coached an under 16 side with a future AFL player and a number of other decent footballers at that age. It was a fairly even mix of elite private school, quality catholic school and a good local secondary school.

There were a couple of rat bag kids who, unsurprisingly had ratbag parents. Otherwise the private school kids weren't any smarter, better at footy or any better behaved but they sure took coaching and direction better. When it was time to shut up and actively listen they did. When it was time to explain a more technical concept - even as simple as a 15 man kick out zone - they grasped it better.

Elite junior footballers and private schools will find each other because the investment in football education is coming through schools.

Gun footballers used to be taught at the school or hard knocks in rough high school lunch times. Now those days are over the kids are getting taught football techniques and athletic development from the schools that can afford it.
 

AjsGuns

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Compared to doctors, lawyers, vets, scientists, engineers, accountants, etc. Yes.

The grades and requirements are very low. Teaching is not taxing on the mind. Its taxing on the ability to not punch whiny little smart arses in the chops.
Interesting point, I spent two years at a GO8 studying Law (was an above avg student, top 30% or so) then realised I wanted to pursue teaching and switched. There is a misconception all teachers had no other option but to teach and had low grades. Agree that maybe 50% of teachers are doing it due to having limited options or as a supplementary income to their other half, but there are 30-40% of teachers who could have been doing something else but love the gig. Pay is good when you first start as a grad, but the ceiling is low unless you go into administration - which is were most of the talented teachers end up unfortunately. Realistically teachers/nurses should be on an extra 10k p/a. Many good primary teachers are in at 8 and leave at 5-6, while doing more work at home. Essentially upaid for 2-4 hours a day. That's before camps/excursions/weekly PD meetings/parent teacher meetings etc.

As for taxing on the mind, depends on the year level and cohort. I've found upper primary and lower secondary pretty cruisy. Grade 4-6 have little behavioral issues and the content is easy, year 7-8 still easy content but behavioural management becomes challenging. Still cruisy though, although many teachers hate teaching year 8, but I found it fine. Just need clear expectations and consequences with engaging/interactive classes, the teachers who complain are the ones who read a powerpoint for 15 minutes then tell them to continue with their work online. Year 10-12 is certainly taxing though with the expectations and I'd imagine grade prep-2 would also be taxing dealing with constant meltdowns and crying (never taught it).

Due to the oversaturation of the degree, most shit teachers are doing CRT or don't get contracts renewed. Also, only about 30% of the uni cohort actually finish the degree so not that many people make it through who shouldn't (there are more than a few...).
 
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