Analysis Random NORTH thoughts not worthy of a thread

Sopwiths North

Canadia Roo
Feb 22, 2018
743
3,370
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Hey SN, I could be wrong but I’m guessing that there might be the odd fishing line being cast in your direction on the more radical solution to the cat issue side of things. If you hang around long enough, somebody will probably recommend Leonardo DiCaprio’s ultimate answer in “Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood” being inflicted on our feline population. Let’s face it, there would be a fair few of us running for cover if the “non-native” argument was carried through fully...


On iPhone using BigFooty.com mobile app
Haven't seen that film yet, but it's near the top of my list.

Nah, my initial lolz was at the Master of Science - who rakes environmentalists over the coals on here on an almost daily basis for having any emotional investment in their work to save the planet - posting hyperbolic outbursts like "I'll shoot them on sight", "kill on sight" about little animals. Also, despite continually demanding to see "the science" from other posters, he has provided none to show that we are living in something akin to The Island of Dr. Moreau, or even an Irwin Allen film for that matter, and that eliminating these species will save the environment. By his own definition, he's pulled a Thunberg. Except that the polar ice caps really ARE melting, and climate change is the real threat to our habitats.

Was just holding up the mirror is all. But like ferbs has already said, there's another thread for this discussion.
 

(Log in to remove this ad.)

ferball

Premium Platinum
Jul 24, 2015
14,132
26,161
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Haven't seen that film yet, but it's near the top of my list.

Nah, my initial lolz was at the Master of Science - who rakes environmentalists over the coals on here on an almost daily basis for having any emotional investment in their work to save the planet - posting hyperbolic outbursts like "I'll shoot them on sight", "kill on sight" about little animals. Also, despite continually demanding to see "the science" from other posters, he has provided none to show that we are living in something akin to The Island of Dr. Moreau, or even an Irwin Allen film for that matter, and that eliminating these species will save the environment. By his own definition, he's pulled a Thunberg. Except that the polar ice caps really ARE melting, and climate change is the real threat to our habitats.

Was just holding up the mirror is all. But like ferbs has already said, there's another thread for this discussion.
FWIW there is a heap of scientific evidence that feral cats, foxes, pigs, camels and cane toads are destroying much of Australia's unique wildlife. In the same way that invasive weeds and excessive land clearing are wiping out their habitat.

But those feral animals and weeds are no worse for the place than whitefellas.

Toads and cats appear to be evolving, well changing and beginning the process anyway. It's fascinating cos toads evolution could be a dead end but it might not. They are adapting to move fast across the landscape but it takes a toll on their bodies. Feral cats are growing. As they get bigger the range of potential prey they can take down increases.

If you think calling for the feral cats to be shot is bad now wait till the outcry after they take their first human kid. Feral cats are getting bigger. 15 years ago someone shot one in Gippsland. It looked like a Panther and measured between 5 and 6 feet from tip to tail.
 

JeanLucGoddard

Brownlow Medallist
Aug 21, 2018
11,031
26,343
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Bit of Kanga-Lotto on Scamper! I love that he's cool with the tail. And glad he's on the mend from his big adventures.

But let's not "kill on sight" any of his brethren. It's not their fault us humans introduced them to where they are. Also, giant eye roll at the poster who continually claims it's all hyperbole and hysteria with respect to climate change ( a much bigger threat to our planet) but damn those pigeons and foxes if I see one they're dead! Kill on sight!!

Good grief.

I would say that if I see the people who introduced those species I'll kill them on sight, but ... never mind.
Nah, feral cats should be killed on sight. They kill more native animals than climate change right now.
 

Sopwiths North

Canadia Roo
Feb 22, 2018
743
3,370
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Nah, feral cats should be killed on sight. They kill more native animals than climate change right now.
I won't argue against what is probably a greater knowledge of your own country's specific situation. But the point of my original post was to have a chuckle at the hypocrisy of a poster who spews vitriol on an almost daily basis on here about climate change activists being - in his opinion - acting on nothing except emotion, going on to post a series of hyperbolic outbursts designed to - I don't know what - make him look tough? - with no scientific evidence (the thing he constantly demands of everyone else on this forum whose opinion differs from his) given to support his fairly extreme statements. I mean, shoot on sight? What if it's actually someone's pet that just got lost?

Anyways, that was my original point, which seems to have gotten altogether lost in the desire to take up arms against what is only one small piece of the puzzle.

But I have been thinking about why the problem is so different in scope and severity down your way, compared to what it is here in Canada. We have a ton of ferals here, but they haven't grown to the physical sizes reported down there, nor are they much of a threat to anything - they exist primarily in urban areas, and eat garbage mostly. Scrounging out of alleyway dumpster bins and whatnot. In port cities like Vancouver, we do feel they help keep the rodent populations down. There's a great deal of trap/neuter/return done here, and many managed colonies - essentially all neutered, shelters built, and volunteers who provide food every day. In the district where I live, we've managed to nearly eradicate the problem. We started about 20 years ago with TNR and the numbers we dealt with were in the hundreds each year. Now we barely ever even get any kittens reported, much less adults. So I do think there is truth to the theory that TNR works, as a more humane method of control, in some areas. The one I live in, for instance.

I think the difference, from the sounds of what I've read, is that your guys's ferals are able to thrive and survive in non-urban, remote, vast areas. Which makes TNR not really feasible. In Canada, they don't survive in wilderness like they do in your part of the world. Why? Is it because of the extreme cold here? Maybe. But then you guys get extreme heat. So it doesn't make sense. I suppose it's possible that we just have bigger predators. Coyotes are everywhere. Raccoons. Cougars. Coyotes' and cougars' number one urban prey is cats. So that may be part of it. It sounds like they are able to exist as an apex predator down there, while up here there is no way.

Anyways, probably the most long-winded non-North thought in the Random North Thoughts thread ever. My apologies for that. Hopefully someone comes up with a Random North Thought soon.
 

JeanLucGoddard

Brownlow Medallist
Aug 21, 2018
11,031
26,343
AFL Club
North Melbourne
I suppose it's possible that we just have bigger predators. Coyotes are everywhere. Raccoons. Cougars. Coyotes' and cougars' number one urban prey is cats. So that may be part of it. It sounds like they are able to exist as an apex predator down there, while up here there is no way.
It is pretty much this and an ecosystem that largely developed with no mammalian predators (until the arrival of dingoes maybe 5000 years ago) and certainly not felines.

The native marsupials just aren't evolved to deal with a predator equipped like the feline.
 

King Corey

Moderator
Jun 9, 2001
23,523
63,880
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
St Johnstone
It is pretty much this and an ecosystem that largely developed with no mammalian predators (until the arrival of dingoes maybe 5000 years ago) and certainly not felines.

The native marsupials just aren't evolved to deal with a predator equipped like the feline.
There will be a time in the near future when kangaroos will routinely disembowel cats.

Rest assured.
 

Kimbo

Brownlow Medallist
Dec 14, 2002
18,836
27,338
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
Sturt, Liverpool
I won't argue against what is probably a greater knowledge of your own country's specific situation. But the point of my original post was to have a chuckle at the hypocrisy of a poster who spews vitriol on an almost daily basis on here about climate change activists being - in his opinion - acting on nothing except emotion, going on to post a series of hyperbolic outbursts designed to - I don't know what - make him look tough? - with no scientific evidence (the thing he constantly demands of everyone else on this forum whose opinion differs from his) given to support his fairly extreme statements. I mean, shoot on sight? What if it's actually someone's pet that just got lost?

Anyways, that was my original point, which seems to have gotten altogether lost in the desire to take up arms against what is only one small piece of the puzzle.

But I have been thinking about why the problem is so different in scope and severity down your way, compared to what it is here in Canada. We have a ton of ferals here, but they haven't grown to the physical sizes reported down there, nor are they much of a threat to anything - they exist primarily in urban areas, and eat garbage mostly. Scrounging out of alleyway dumpster bins and whatnot. In port cities like Vancouver, we do feel they help keep the rodent populations down. There's a great deal of trap/neuter/return done here, and many managed colonies - essentially all neutered, shelters built, and volunteers who provide food every day. In the district where I live, we've managed to nearly eradicate the problem. We started about 20 years ago with TNR and the numbers we dealt with were in the hundreds each year. Now we barely ever even get any kittens reported, much less adults. So I do think there is truth to the theory that TNR works, as a more humane method of control, in some areas. The one I live in, for instance.

I think the difference, from the sounds of what I've read, is that your guys's ferals are able to thrive and survive in non-urban, remote, vast areas. Which makes TNR not really feasible. In Canada, they don't survive in wilderness like they do in your part of the world. Why? Is it because of the extreme cold here? Maybe. But then you guys get extreme heat. So it doesn't make sense. I suppose it's possible that we just have bigger predators. Coyotes are everywhere. Raccoons. Cougars. Coyotes' and cougars' number one urban prey is cats. So that may be part of it. It sounds like they are able to exist as an apex predator down there, while up here there is no way.

Anyways, probably the most long-winded non-North thought in the Random North Thoughts thread ever. My apologies for that. Hopefully someone comes up with a Random North Thought soon.
Completely different environments Sops. In urban areas they are more ‘strays’. Ferals tend to live in the bush and destroy millions upon millions of native fauna (birds, reptiles and small marsupials.) Like wild pigs (that become boars) they grow in size too; generally not mistaken for ‘blackie’ the family cat. (That said, cats should be under curfew imho.)

Australian native fauna hasn’t had to deal with predators, except perhaps raptors, so they are easy prey. 😢

I facilitated a workshop earlier in the year on the feral cat situation. It’s a far bigger problem than most Australians would be aware of. I think the millions figure related to daily catch!! Partly due to the very high numbers of feral cats, partly due to the high number of prey per cat each day.

So, when the issue is the preservation of native species - they are already ‘credited’ with contributing to (bird) species extinction - it’s a no-brainer. They have to be eradicated, although they aren’t easy to catch or kill with various methods being trialled. The best long-term solution is community education, vet education and support (for de-sexing). Government support is very limited.
 

Sopwiths North

Canadia Roo
Feb 22, 2018
743
3,370
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Completely different environments Sops. In urban areas they are more ‘strays’. Ferals tend to live in the bush and destroy millions upon millions of native fauna (birds, reptiles and small marsupials.) Like wild pigs (that become boars) they grow in size too; generally not mistaken for ‘blackie’ the family cat. (That said, cats should be under curfew imho.)

Australian native fauna hasn’t had to deal with predators, except perhaps raptors, so they are easy prey. 😢

I facilitated a workshop earlier in the year on the feral cat situation. It’s a far bigger problem than most Australians would be aware of. I think the millions figure related to daily catch!! Partly due to the very high numbers of feral cats, partly due to the high number of prey per cat each day.

So, when the issue is the preservation of native species - they are already ‘credited’ with contributing to (bird) species extinction - it’s a no-brainer. They have to be eradicated, although they aren’t easy to catch or kill with various methods being trialled. The best long-term solution is community education, vet education and support (for de-sexing). Government support is very limited.
Yep, it's a lot of tough graft here too, but still far more do-able than your guys's situation. There's no government support at all, and the official mandates of all our animal control agencies (including our SPCA) is to trap and kill. TNR is done by all volunteers, including covering expenses.

The reason I brought up the "it might be somebody's pet" is because you will very rarely ever see a feral cat out and about here. They're very shy and reclusive around people. So if there's a cat here that you could "shoot on sight", it's very likely someone's pet.
 

Ryz

.
Aug 26, 2002
14,614
13,982
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
MMA
Completely different environments Sops. In urban areas they are more ‘strays’. Ferals tend to live in the bush and destroy millions upon millions of native fauna (birds, reptiles and small marsupials.) Like wild pigs (that become boars) they grow in size too; generally not mistaken for ‘blackie’ the family cat. (That said, cats should be under curfew imho.)

Australian native fauna hasn’t had to deal with predators, except perhaps raptors, so they are easy prey. 😢

I facilitated a workshop earlier in the year on the feral cat situation. It’s a far bigger problem than most Australians would be aware of. I think the millions figure related to daily catch!! Partly due to the very high numbers of feral cats, partly due to the high number of prey per cat each day.

So, when the issue is the preservation of native species - they are already ‘credited’ with contributing to (bird) species extinction - it’s a no-brainer. They have to be eradicated, although they aren’t easy to catch or kill with various methods being trialled. The best long-term solution is community education, vet education and support (for de-sexing). Government support is very limited.
Thanks for the extra insight, while I haven't necessarily agreed with everything in the thread, I take a lot of what you've said on board.

Great post.
 

(Log in to remove this ad.)

Snake_Baker

L'enfant terrible
Apr 24, 2013
53,817
102,633
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
The Unicornia Reactants
Yep, it's a lot of tough graft here too, but still far more do-able than your guys's situation. There's no government support at all, and the official mandates of all our animal control agencies (including our SPCA) is to trap and kill. TNR is done by all volunteers, including covering expenses.

The reason I brought up the "it might be somebody's pet" is because you will very rarely ever see a feral cat out and about here. They're very shy and reclusive around people. So if there's a cat here that you could "shoot on sight", it's very likely someone's pet.
They devastate the native wildlife populations. Kill on sight.

1577343999701.png





 

blackshadow

Premium Gold
Sep 24, 2007
23,791
31,625
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
Team WADA
Nah, feral cats should be killed on sight. They kill more native animals than climate change right now.
I remember a fine day before the Howard gun controls when I sat up with an automatic shotgun and destroyed 13 feral cats with 5 shots. Good times!


It took a few days to set up in a farm shed enticing the buggers with a bowl of milk and then setting them up for the carnage.
 

SMaturin

Premiership Player
Oct 27, 2010
4,690
18,197
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
Atalanta BC
I remember a fine day before the Howard gun controls when I sat up with an automatic shotgun and destroyed 13 feral cats with 5 shots. Good times!


It took a few days to set up in a farm shed enticing the buggers with a bowl of milk and then setting them up for the carnage.
We had a biiiig mama set up shop and have a litter under our house when I was a wee lad.

Pa and I took care of them.
 

Top Bottom