Sexual Misconduct in Hollywood (+ now Australia!) - All individuals combined

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BlakeyNoFlakey

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The Casting Couch has been a part of Hollywood for many years, and while I agree that Weinstein is a sick man, he has been supported by a community of people turning a blind eye, keeping silent, and enabling him. You can even say this about the women he has forced himself on too. So while we're pointing the finger at Weinstein, let's not forget to do so for the many people who knew this was happening but said/did nothing (apart from the Italian actress/model who went to the police).
 

JackOutback

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The Casting Couch has been a part of Hollywood for many years, and while I agree that Weinstein is a sick man, he has been supported by a community of people turning a blind eye, keeping silent, and enabling him. You can even say this about the women he has forced himself on too. So while we're pointing the finger at Weinstein, let's not forget to do so for the many people who knew this was happening but said/did nothing (apart from the Italian actress/model who went to the police).
No, it's not the victims' fault; in many cases, it appears they were bullied, threatened and paid to ensure their silence. Other women had their careers ruined because they spoke up. It's all well and good to say women should sabotage their career and life in the vain hope he won't do it again but that's neither fair nor likely.

There is definitely blame to go around to those that helped him, and those with power and influence who did nothing.

This was apparently an open secret for years
Why is everyone coming out en masse now?
Because someone with power and influence was able to expose it (the NY Times). This enabled women to come forward without the risk of their careers being destroyed.
 

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blackcat

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Open season on Harvey Weinstein.

Makes you wonder why anyone would want to be an actress. Paid less than men, fewer roles than men, career over at 40, and there's the Hollywood casting couch.
they sublimated any agency to have the voice they now decry when W made them into people with profile, a modern #Zeno's_paradox innit,

I would bet my life on it that numerous who have now slaughtered him and slandered him, slept with him knowing they would have a chance at the part in the next Tarantino flick, and they never asked themself(selves) if they are gonna whore themselves out to the fat man, that means the other starlet who chooses not, misses the part. I think the concern is for the other woman who missed the part cos she did not put out, or, more pointedly, putting out is is the raison d'etre of hollywood, you put out, you get paid. They now whinge that they need to put out, but they got the role, the dough, the profile, the oscars, aint that the compact? And now I am supposed to cry into my chardy for them? cry me a river...

I think the worst is the wife, she ran straight to the crisis management agency and filed the divorce papers, when was that in her compact? She willingly forgo autonomy (now THAT is indeed a paradox), now she runs...

They will take Harvey for more than half his capital which is significant, (I am accounting for the divorce settlement), but he wont be on his @rse, still have more than 100USmill to recruit some new floozy.

How many of the oscar award winners minge did he have his way with? I reckon you would be looking close to double figures. Does this say more about him, or about them? They are free to fuck who they wish, good luck to them, but where is the analytical rigour in this LA tragedy. It seems that Clementine Ford scripted this for her blog. evo please get your girlfriend under control.
 

Bomberboyokay

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Harvey Weinstein Is Gone. But Hollywood Still Has a Problem.


By MANOHLA DARGIS OCT. 11, 2017


When I read the recent allegations that Harvey Weinstein had sexually harassed women for decades, I thought — well, of course. Mr. Weinstein was a famously swaggering bully, and while I hadn’t heard about the specific charges of sexual abuse by women working for him, such behavior fits the movie industry’s pervasive, unrepentant exploitation of women. And then on Tuesday, The New Yorker revealed that three women, including the Italian actress-turned-director Asia Argento, said that “Weinstein raped them.”

The revelations in the New York Times investigation into Mr. Weinstein repelled me, but The New Yorker’s article made me weep. Since then, I have been thinking a lot about all the women I know who have been assaulted and harassed, and I’ve thought about my own experiences, some ugly, others absurd — like the time in New York when a director lurched at me while I was interviewing him. I jumped out of the way and calmly kept talking. I chalked the episode up to male sexist business as usual. In the moment, I didn’t see his behavior as characteristic of the movie industry; he was just another man trying to wield power over a woman. It wasn’t traumatic — it was ordinary.

It is the perverse, insistent, matter-of-factness of male sexual predation and assault — of men’s power over women — that haunts the revelations about Mr. Weinstein. This banality of abuse also haunts the American movie industry. Women helped build the industry, but it has long been a male-dominated enterprise that systematically treats women — as a class — as inferior to men. It is an industry with a history of sexually exploiting younger female performers and stamping expiration dates on older ones. It is an industry that consistently denies female directors employment and contemptuously treats the female audience as a niche, a problem, an afterthought.

It’s greatly encouraging that women like Gwyneth Paltrow have gone public about Mr. Weinstein. But he is not an aberration. He is an ordinary, malignant symptom of systemic sexism, as is everyone who facilitated him, shrugs it off now or offensively asks why women didn’t say something sooner. What largely separates Mr. Weinstein from other predators, within and without the entertainment world, is that he was once powerful, he got caught and a number of gutsy women are on the record. Together, their voices are creating a forceful rejoinder to an industry that runs on fear and in which silence is at once a defense and a weapon as well as a condition of employment.

The industry’s silence has historically shielded the men who make movies, including the old studio bosses like Louis B. Mayer to whom Mr. Weinstein has often been nostalgically compared. In histories, these old-studio chiefs are genteelly referred to as womanizers, a polite metaphor for conduct that ranges from time on the casting couch, another odious euphemism, to what sounds a lot like prostitution. According to the historian Scott Eyman, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer — the studio that bore Mayer’s name and boasted that it had more stars than there are in heaven — had a supply “of what were known as ‘six-month-option girls’ to be passed around the executive offices.”

If this seems, well, normal it is because this tawdry glimpse into the industry — with its powerful men and passed-around girls — is deeply embedded in its history, its lore and its very identity. It’s the old yet evergreen story of the dewy young woman who comes to Hollywood, does a screen test and maybe signs a contract. The company dyes her hair blonde, feeds her pills and puts her on a diet or under a plastic surgeon’s knife. The lucky ones become Marilyn Monroe (or the It Girl du jour); the luckier ones get out alive. Others remain passed-around girls. The old studio system is gone, but the attitude that exploitation is part of the price for being in the business — hey, it’s Hollywood — endures.

One paradox of Mr. Weinstein’s career is that while he emerged in the independent film world in the 1980s — positioning his earlier company, Miramax Films, as the David to the mainstream’s Goliath — he helped build a media giant that came to resemble an old-fashioned Hollywood studio. In an age of drab bean counters, Miramax had moxie and mystique. Importantly, it had a stable of publicity-ready female stars like Ms. Paltrow and rock-star male auteurs, most notably a favorite of critics, Quentin Tarantino. Sure, Mr. Weinstein might sometimes swing at someone, literally, but in Harveywood misdeeds were soon overshadowed by box-office tallies and savvy public relations.

Peter Biskind, a former editor at the film magazine Premiere, tried to investigate Mr. Weinstein back in 1991, but writes that Miramax threatened to pull its advertising, adding, “the next thing I knew, Harvey was writing columns for Premiere and I was his editor.” Over the years, Mr. Weinstein’s grip on soft-bellied entertainment news media remained firm partly because it was mutually advantageous. And, as he rose, he supported women who supported him. In 2007, he presented a Crystal Award — given by Women in Film — to Renée Zellweger, a star of Miramax titles like “Chicago.”

Given the revelations about Mr. Weinstein, it may seem surprising that his companies also offered actual opportunities for women, including directors like Jane Campion (“The Piano”) and older actresses like Judi Dench (“Shakespeare in Love”). This wasn’t progressive; it was evidence of a shrewd embrace of old-studio-style product diversification. In some ways, it is because Mr. Weinstein and his brother, Bob Weinstein, released different kinds of movies and didn’t pour all their resources only into formulas — and male-driven superhero movies — that they gave women opportunities.

Jenni Konner, the co-showrunner for the HBO series “Girls,” has said that the revelations about Mr. Weinstein are a tipping point: “This is the moment we look back on and say, ‘That’s when it all started to change.’” I hope she’s right. One problem is that the entertainment industry is extraordinarily forgiving of those who have made it a lot of money, as Mel Gibson can tell you. It might glance at the fallen comrade on the floor, but only so it can step over the body en route to the next meeting. And if that comrade somehow gets on his feet again, the industry will ask if he has a new project. This forgiveness is often ascribed to the familiar line that the only thing the business cares about is money.

Money often serves as a rationale for some of the industry’s noxiousness, including its sexism and racism: We can’t hire women, blacks, etc., because they don’t sell. Outsiders tend to see the industry as liberal, and while insiders do promote progressive causes, the business hews to a fundamental conservatism. This conservatism shapes its story recycling, its exploitation of women (and men) and its preservation of a male-dominated, racially homogeneous system. Despite pressure, including from the likes of Ava DuVernay and Lena Dunham, the industry resists change. Those in power don’t see an upside in ceding it.

Although the allegations against Mr. Weinstein may not prove to be the necessary tipping point, they are part of growing feminist pressure to change the industry. Activists inside and outside the entertainment bubble are calling out its biases — and showing how those biases affect employment, which in turn affects representations and audiences. (According to The Los Angeles Times, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission — spurred to action by the American Civil Liberties Union — began contacting female film and TV directors in 2015 to see what issues they’re facing.)

I hope real change comes soon, especially for the women working in the industry who each day are forced to fight sexism just so that they can do their jobs. I hope change comes because the movies need new and different voices and visions, something other than deadening, damaging stereotypes and storybook clichés. And I hope change comes for those of us who love movies. I’ve spent a lifetime navigating the contradictions of that love, grappling with the pleasures movies offer with the misogyny that too often has informed what happened behind the camera and what is onscreen. The movies can break your heart, but this isn’t the time only for tears. It is also the time for rage.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/11/movies/harvey-weinstein-hollywood.html?rref=collection/sectioncollection/movies&action=click&contentCollection=movies&region=rank&module=package&version=highlights&contentPlacement=5&pgtype=sectionfront
 

Bomberboyokay

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But Weinstein isn’t the only powerful man in Hollywood whose patterns of predatory sexual behavior have been an open secret for years. They’re all over the place and Hollywood’s silence and willingness to tolerate heinous behavior from powerful men empowers them to keep finding victims. This week’s Douchebag Decree goes to all who enable predatory men in Hollywood, with a reminder of what some of them have actually done.

Harvey Weinstein, producer
Heinous Habits:

“In 2014, Mr. Weinstein invited Emily Nestor, who had worked just one day as a temporary employee, to the same hotel and made another offer: If she accepted his sexual advances, he would boost her career.” —Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, Decades of Sexual Harassment Accusations Against Harvey Weinstein

Movies he has tainted: Carol, Silver Linings Playbook, The King’s Speech, Ella Enchanted, The Lord of the Rings trilogy, Chocolat, Shakespeare in Love, Good Will Hunting (and lots more)

Casey Affleck, actor and director
Heinous Habits:

“During the middle of the night, Plaintiff awoke to find Affleck lying in the bed next to her. Unbeknownst to Plaintiff, Affleck had entered her bedroom while she was asleep and crawled into the bed. When she woke up, Affleck was curled up next to her in the bed wearing only his underwear and a t-shirt. He had his arm around her, was caressing her back, his face was within inches of hers and his breath reeked of alcohol. Plaintiff was shocked and repulsed because she did not know where he had touched her while she was sleeping or how long he had been there before she woke up.” —Gorka v. Affleck (2010)

Movies he has tainted: Manchester by the Sea, Ocean’s Eleven, American Pie 2, and Good Will Hunting (with Weinstein)

Woody Allen, director
Heinous Habits:

“When I was seven years old, Woody Allen took me by the hand and led me into a dim, closet-like attic on the second floor of our house. He told me to lay on my stomach and play with my brother’s electric train set. Then he sexually assaulted me. He talked to me while he did it, whispering that I was a good girl, that this was our secret, promising that we’d go to Paris and I’d be a star in his movies.” —An Open Letter from Dylan Farrow

Movies he has tainted: Annie Hall (and every movie he’s ever made)

James Woods, actor
Heinous Habits:

“At one point you suggested we should all go to Las Vegas together. ‘It’s such a great place, have you ever been?’ You tried to make it sound innocent. This is something predatory men like to do, I’ve noticed. Make it sound innocent. Just a dollop of insinuation. Just a hair of persuasion. Just a pinch of suggestion. ‘It will be so much fun, I promise you. Nothing has to happen, we will just have a good time together.’ I told you my age, kindly and with no judgment or aggression. I told you my age because I thought you would be immediately horrified and take back your offer. You laughed and said, ‘Even better. We’ll have so much fun, I promise.’” —An Open Letter from Amber Tamblyn

Movies he has tainted: The Virgin Suicides, Videodrome

Bernardo Bertolucci, director
Heinous Habits:

“The sequence of the butter is an idea that I had with Marlon in the morning before shooting it. But in a way, I’ve been horrible to Maria because I didn’t tell her what was going on. Because I wanted her reaction as a girl, not as an actress. I wanted her to react when she felt humiliated. And I think that she hated me and also Marlon because we didn’t tell her.” —Bernardo Bertolucci

Movies he has tainted: Last Tango in Paris

Bill Cosby, comedian
Heinous Habits:

“So I took the pill and washed it down with some red wine. And then he reached across and put another pill in my mouth and gave her one. Just after I took the second pill, my face was, like, face-in-plate syndrome, and I just said, ‘I wanna go home.’ He said he would drive us home. We went up this elevator. I sat down, and lay my head back, just fighting nausea. I looked around and he was sitting next to my roommate on the love seat with this very predatory look on his face. She was completely unconscious. I could hear the words in my head, but I couldn’t form words with my mouth, because I was so drugged out. He got up and came over, and he sat down and unzipped his fly. He had me give him oral sex, and then he stood me up, turned me over, did me doggy style, and walked out. Just as he got to the door, I said, ‘How do we get out of here, how do we get home?’ And he said, ‘Call a cab.’” —Victoria Valentino, ‘I’m No Longer Afraid’: 35 Women Tell Their Stories About Being Assaulted by Bill Cosby, and the Culture That Wouldn’t Listen

Movies he has tainted: every screen he’s appeared on

Roman Polanski, director
Heinous Habits:

“He sat down beside me and asked me if I was okay. I said, ‘No.’ He goes, ‘Well, you’ll be better.’ And I go, ‘No, I won’t. I have to go home.’ He reached over and he kissed me. And I was telling him, ‘No,’ you know, ‘keep away.’ But I was kind of afraid of him because there was no one else there.” —The People of the State of California v. Polanski (1977)

Movies he has tainted: Rosemary’s Baby, Chinatown

Donald Trump, reality personality
Heinous Habits:

“I did try and fu** her. She was married. I moved on her like a bitch, but I couldn’t get there. And she was married. Then all of a sudden I see her, she’s now got the big phony tits and everything. She’s totally changed her look. I’ve gotta use some Tic Tacs, just in case I start kissing her. You know I’m automatically attracted to beautiful—I just start kissing them. It’s like a magnet. Just kiss. I don’t even wait. And when you’re a star they let you do it. You can do anything… Grab them by the pussy. You can do anything.” —Donald Trump

Movies he has tainted: Zoolander, Home Alone 2, Horrorween (also, you know, the entire world)

https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/weinstein-hollywood-open-secret
 

blackcat

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but all of those cadres we have feted, and we fete them knowing the truth. and at times, suppressing disbelief, we enable.

the psychologists call it a cognitive dissonance, it is pure human behaviour, now we pile on as critics, but, those that played the game of harvey act in symbiosis to his womanising, now they kick up and complain when they played this game. sour milk guys. sour milk.

#LouisPasteur medusala French milk chemistry innit
 

psychobrown

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Indeed, it seems the days of the sleazy producer and the casting couch are drawing to a close, in the studio system anyway. Harvey has passed his expiration date to someone and he's been thrown to the wolves now, given that it's open season on him from people whose careers he manufactured, he's seriously pi**ed the powerbrokers off. His Oscar-bait model is out of date now and Dimension is running on empty, so he was slipping off the pole and the time is right I guess, Spielberg must be laughing his ass off. I shudder for when it becomes time for Schwarzenegger to have his dirty laundry dragged up in this climate, there will be much worse if it comes to it, though we'll get more classic one-liners ontop of the existing ones (e.g. "eating is not cheating", "I like the way my dick looks in your tiny hands", etc).
 

JackNah_8

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This was apparently an open secret for years
Why is everyone coming out en masse now?
Seth MacFarlane made some joke about this at the Oscars. I believe Ashley Judd and Rose McGowan spoke about Weinstein's behaviour awhile ago but no one really listened, not sure what happened there.

As sexual harassment and assault claims against Weinstein continue mounting, several news outlets unearthed a clip of MacFarlane’s zinger after he and actress Emma Stone revealed the Best Supporting Actress nominations that year in a ceremony leading up to the awards show. “Congratulations, you five ladies no longer have to pretend to be attracted to Harvey Weinstein,” the Oscars host snapped.


MacFarlane, an actor and filmmaker who created “Ted,” explained that his quip stemmed from “Ted” actress Jessica Barth telling him privately a few years earlier that she had been victimized by Weinstein. Her account of the producer demanding a naked massage became public in a New Yorker story on Tuesday.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/entry/seth-macfarlane-harvey-weinstein-oscars_us_59df3449e4b00abf36466ea1
 

JackNah_8

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Have Scarlett Johansson or Jessica Biel been in any of his movies..??
Not sure about them. Another big star who has been in his movies is Jennifer Lawrence:

"I was deeply disturbed to hear the news about Harvey Weinstein's behavior. I worked with Harvey five years ago and I did not experience any form of harassment personally, nor did I know about any of these allegations. This kind of abuse is inexcusable and absolutely upsetting," Lawrence told E! News in a statement."

http://www.eonline.com/news/885949/jennifer-lawrence-deeply-disturbed-to-hear-about-harvey-weinstein-s-behavior

Meanwhile, Weinstein has been expelled from Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science.

HARVEY Weinstein has effectively been kicked out of Hollywood.

The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences - the organisers of the Oscars - announced that they had expelled the disgraced producer after a meeting.

A statement from the 54-member board revealed it had voted “well in excess of the required two-thirds majority to immediately expel him from the Academy”.

“We do so not simply to separate ourselves from someone who does not merit the respect of his colleagues but also to send a message that the era of willful ignorance and shameful complicity in sexually predatory behavior and workplace harassment in our industry is over.

What’s at issue here is a deeply troubling problem that has no place in our society. The Board continues to work to establish ethical standards of conduct that all Academy members will be expected to exemplify.”

The Producers Guild of America was also to meet to “consider disciplinary proceedings and the status of his membership,” a source close to the union told AFP.

The move - the final nail in the coffin of Weinstein’s Hollywood career - comes after his own brother unloaded on him in a new interview.
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/entertainment/celebrity/bob-weinstein-says-brother-harvey-has-shown-no-remorse-for-sexual-harassment-against-dozens-of-women/news-story/256a09e3b46a68f8a37eb3a86e139c25
 
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BlakeyNoFlakey

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No, it's not the victims' fault; in many cases, it appears they were bullied,
I agree, and I hope you weren't thinking I was blaming them, but if people are sexually harassed and they don't do anything about it (even if they fear their careers etc) then they're also contributing to the problem as well, and setting the way for the next victim to be assaulted.
 
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