Society/Culture Should a trade apprenticeship be valued as highly as a university degree ?

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Carringbush2010

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What I find perplexing is absolutely necessary roles like paramedics, nurses, firies, police etc. are paid so poorly compared to trade work.

For example my cousin is a senior constable in the Victorian police force, I work in a warehouse on a gold mine. It's clear between both of us I am paid much more highly - yet the job of a senior constable is much more necessary (to society) and much more dangerous.

Sure warehousing in town is near base level wages and is the norm, my work requires a trade certificate among other certificates / licences like national high risk, crane and dogging etc. etc.(yes folks, stores people are tradies - according to the government). It is a lucrative gig, but that doesn't excuse those more needed getting less money.

Seeing how these required roles are public servant roles, I wouldn't one bit begrudge any of them making more than I do and my tax dollars going toward achieving an appropriate salary / wage for these heroes.
 

Nuggs Bunny

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What I find perplexing is absolutely necessary roles like paramedics, nurses, firies, police etc. are paid so poorly compared to trade work.

For example my cousin is a senior constable in the Victorian police force, I work in a warehouse on a gold mine. It's clear between both of us I am paid much more highly - yet the job of a senior constable is much more necessary (to society) and much more dangerous.

Sure warehousing in town is near base level wages and is the norm, my work requires a trade certificate among other certificates / licences like national high risk, crane and dogging etc. etc.(yes folks, stores people are tradies - according to the government). It is a lucrative gig, but that doesn't excuse those more needed getting less money.

Seeing how these required roles are public servant roles, I wouldn't one bit begrudge any of them making more than I do and my tax dollars going toward achieving an appropriate salary / wage for these heroes.
There's no shortage of people who want to be paramedics or nurses or firefighters or police or teachers though, if so many people want to do the job then why do they need to be paid more? Obviously the career is attractive enough that some people just want to do it irrespective of the remuneration, and I know with police and teachers the leave arrangements are pretty attractive and there are plenty of other perks as well.

Meanwhile there are exceedingly few people who are prepared to complete an apprenticeship and then work FIFO on a 4:1 roster on an oil rig, and that's why some boilermakers get paid $300,000 per year. Trades in general are not attractive jobs to a lot of people; the hours are long, the work is hard (manual labour is far, far tougher on the body than any office environment), the job site changes frequently and ongoing work isn't always guaranteed. The only upside to convince new apprentices to take up trades is the pay.

Besides, if we were going to start pointing fingers at professions who do not deserve their salary, the obvious place to start is the real estate industry.
 

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Carringbush2010

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There's no shortage of people who want to be paramedics or nurses or firefighters or police or teachers though, if so many people want to do the job then why do they need to be paid more? Obviously the career is attractive enough that some people just want to do it irrespective of the remuneration, and I know with police and teachers the leave arrangements are pretty attractive and there are plenty of other perks as well.

Meanwhile there are exceedingly few people who are prepared to complete an apprenticeship and then work FIFO on a 4:1 roster on an oil rig, and that's why some boilermakers get paid $300,000 per year. Trades in general are not attractive jobs to a lot of people; the hours are long, the work is hard (manual labour is far, far tougher on the body than any office environment), the job site changes frequently and ongoing work isn't always guaranteed. The only upside to convince new apprentices to take up trades is the pay.

Besides, if we were going to start pointing fingers at professions who do not deserve their salary, the obvious place to start is the real estate industry.
Completely agree with your first paragraph, as an example my cousin does it for job satisfaction over remuneration - one could argue that these wonderful people do their roles more so coz they want to help people. They're noble indeed. I do agree that supply and demand is part of reason for below par wages / salaries for these people.

One could say the same for 'trades' - money is not always the only attraction, builders like building things, sparkies are fascinated by spark. Boilies like fabricating stuff, mechanics like cars etc. etc.

Also FIFO is not just hard manual labour in the dessert or off shore in ridiculous rosters like 4 and 1, in fact those rosters are rare, they're more on equal work / life balance now - the biggest reason personally I do FIFO. Not to mention many jobs in remote resource roles include anything from admin, to machine operation to maintenance to human resources to medical personnel to catering for the workforce. A lot of remote resource workplaces are nigh on completely self sufficient.

In saying that, it seems on face value that the majority of the workforce are not completely satisfied in their work, like the young person working in hospitality to get through that uni course. Or the old person perpetually stuck in menial roles that no one dreams of when they're a young 5 yo.

This is the reason people go to uni or take up an apprenticeship, if they're going to be unhappy in their job may as well get a comfortable wage / salary and then there are those that have aspired to their chosen profession since they were that 5 yo.
 

RAPPA

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Be the best you can be, whether with a trade qual, diploma, certificate or a uni degree. Fk the stereotypes, stigmas or connotations that are attached to professions. At the end of the day, in any industry you get both ends of the spectrum - competence and incompetence. I would say society is trending against perceiving having a degree as “prestigious” and instead viewing a trade as more lucrative. Plus, there are a plethora of universities and the market is saturated with easy opportunities to get a degree and so every second person has a bloody degree.
 

medusala

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Happens anywhere the ruling class don’t want there bullshit called out by people who have even a fraction of a clue.
Lol. Its the academic's BS that generally needs to be called out. Look at THEIR unhinged nonsense re supposed "science" with respect to Covid and the "climate crisis".

The issue is that politicians (and even worse journalists who generally are as thick as mince and as lazy as toads) swallow the utter nonsense of absurd "models" parading as "science".

Even worse is the area of economics where these so called intellectuals still insist that Keynesian economics works whilst everyone in the real world knows its a steaming pile of nonsense dreamt up by an anti semitic pervert.
 

swingdog

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On graduate jobs and salaries, she said: "University graduates earn up to $1 million more over their lifetimes on average and are 2.5 times less likely to be unemployed than those without a higher qualification.

 

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Kwality

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Do any job really give you job satisfaction though? They all become repetitive and monotonous to a degree. The degree varies but there ain’t any fun jobs. Happiness is outside work.
You dont do 36 hours straight on a salary unless you enjoy the challenge.
 

kickazz

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Careful what you wish for - not sure tradies would appreciate huge HECS debts.

I'd say short term, a trade may be more valuable when you consider the income/debt equation.

Long term, as in looking at people say over 50 years of age, those with a degree are probably faring better. Some trades are really tough on the body.

For some people the sweet spot is concentrating on a trade when you are young, then perhaps doing some Tertiary Qual in business or similar so that you can continue to make money as you get older and less physically capable.
 

Power Raid

TheBrownDog
Oct 15, 2004
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Hi guys interested in your thoughts as I find it puzzling that society still doesn't place the same prestigious value on a trade qualification that they do on a degree.

To me they are different but equal.

Thoughts ?
Different but equal

By that I mean an arts degree has a different value to an engineering or accounting degree

But a valued trade should be valued in the same light as a valued degree
 

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