Certified Legendary Thread Sympathy for *essendon II - the streak continues as * lose '21 EF to WBD - over 6200 days since EFC won a final / RIP D2D and T_S

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amaz199

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Apr 5, 2015
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I’m learning about PED use in sport in uni Rn. It must be so embarrassing being the #1 example lmfao
The *Essendon supplements saga also got heaps of attention in Yr 12 when students chose their oral presentations.

It was such a hot topic with so many angles it was easily a guaranteed high mark assignment.

But I think it was only allowed if it was hot news. So the kids back then would've been insanely lucky.
 

LuvtheKangas

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The *Essendon supplements saga also got heaps of attention in Yr 12 when students chose their oral presentations.

It was such a hot topic with so many angles it was easily a guaranteed high mark assignment.

But I think it was only allowed if it was hot news. So the kids back then would've been insanely lucky.
Except for the ones drafted by *, of course.
 

giantroo

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Essendon documentary: Jobe Watson and Tim Watson on the 2012 Brownlow Medal as Bombers lift lid on supplements saga

A defiant Jobe Watson says he never should have been stripped of the 2012 Brownlow Medal in a new Essendon documentary that lifts the lid on the club’s darkest days.

Jay Clark and Michael Warner

4 min read

September 17, 2021 - 5:00AM

News Corp Australia Sports Newsroom

Jobe Watson believes he is still the 2012 Brownlow medallist, despite the AFL’s decision to strip him of the award in the wake of the Essendon supplements saga. Picture: Getty Images

Essendon great Jobe Watson says he is the rightful owner of the 2012 Brownlow Medal amid fresh calls for footy’s highest individual honour to be returned to him.

Opening up on the toll of the devastating supplements saga, Watson declared: “If I felt I had cheated, then I wouldn’t have accepted the medal in the first place”.

Asked whether he still feels he is the deserved winner of the 2012 medal later awarded to runners-up Trent Cotchin of Richmond and Hawthorn’s Sam Mitchell, Watson replied: “I feel like I am.”

“Whether or not someone else has it, or whether or not someone else views it that I wasn’t the deserved winner then that is fine.

“But it doesn’t change how I felt or how I feel about it.”

Jobe Watson with his 2012 Brownlow Medal, the day after the ceremony. Picture: Getty Images

It is 10 years this month since the ill-fated supplements program began that would trigger the greatest scandal in Australian sports history.

Watson’s father, club great Tim Watson, said the “injustice” of the decision to strip his son of the Brownlow because of a doping ban was “like the final crushing thing about that whole episode”.

He said he “worried” about how his 36-year-old son would cope with the aftershocks of the saga “for the rest of his life” considering Jobe became “the face” of the scandal.


“I found that (handing back the Brownlow Medal) the most difficult thing, that you could have that taken away from you without there being any … I don’t believe real justification,” Tim Watson said.

“It has been a tough journey for him and, as a parent, it has been difficult at times to observe it close hand. Injustice is a very difficult thing for people to get over.”

The record books show Sam Mitchell and Trent Cotchin are the 2012 Brownlow medallists.

Asked how he reflects on the experience, Jobe was adamant he had “forgiven” and “moved on” but said his overall emotion was “sadness”.

“It has been really challenging,” Jobe Watson said.

“I look back on it and wonder how I was able to get through it.

“It was such a drawn-out process and moved so much from one extreme to another and emotionally — it was just exhausting.”

Former Essendon chairman Paul Little, who likened the drugs saga to “a war”, said he hoped the 2012 Brownlow would eventually be returned to its rightful owner.

“I’m hopeful one day it will be reinstated,” Little said.

The AFL’s decision to strip Jobe of the 2012 Brownlow Medal does not sit well with the Watsons.

In an eight-part documentary series titled ‘The Bombers: Stories of a great club’, to be aired on Fox Footy and Kayo from October 19, former Bombers president David Evans speaks for the first time about the drugs scandal and admits mistakes were made in dealing with the saga.

“Some things in hindsight that you would have done differently, but there was no playbook for it,” Evans said.

“This was something that we were thrust into that there was no precedents.”

Evans led the fateful decision at the start of the saga that saw the Bombers “self-report” to the AFL and Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority, triggering a five-year storm.

Coach James Hird said “what happened to Jobe was horrific”.

“I don’t believe anything they took (was) illegal,” Hird said.

“I certainly don’t believe that Jobe got any unfair advantage during that year and should definitely still have his Brownlow.”

Jobe Watson, flanked by teammates when the supplements saga first emerged. Picture: Getty Images

Watson in 2013 opened up on the supplements program, saying “having that many injections was something I had not experienced in AFL football before”.

The late legendary club doctor Bruce Reid, who wrote a letter of complaint to club chiefs about the injections program, said Watson should not have been stripped of the medal.

“Jobe Watson should still have his Brownlow,” Reid said.

Essendon champion Matthew Lloyd said Watson had masked the pain.

“I’m sure that eats up at him, as much as he doesn't show it,” Lloyd said.

Former coach John Worsfold said: “He was the one, even after the suspension happened, who was still trying to be (the) strongest and hold that group together, and be that leader.

“He was probably the one we felt was the most vulnerable to the big let-down.”

Jobe Watson during his playing days at Essendon. Picture: Wayne Ludbey

After a break from the game, Watson, a two-time All-Australian and three-time best and fairest winner, has returned to football in a special comments role with Channel 7.

Essendon chief executive Xavier Campbell said the whole drugs affair was “heartbreaking” and particularly unfair on Hird, who was a “really good person”, and Watson.

“He (Watson) was put in a really difficult position. That was unfair on him, it should never have happened. And that shouldn’t, and won’t, define Jobe Watson,” Campbell said.

Campbell said the club had sought closure on the saga.

“The Essendon network didn’t fracture,” he said.

“It could have (fractured) at so many different moments.”
 

see see

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Essendon documentary: Jobe Watson and Tim Watson on the 2012 Brownlow Medal as Bombers lift lid on supplements saga

A defiant Jobe Watson says he never should have been stripped of the 2012 Brownlow Medal in a new Essendon documentary that lifts the lid on the club’s darkest days.

Jay Clark and Michael Warner

4 min read

September 17, 2021 - 5:00AM

News Corp Australia Sports Newsroom

Jobe Watson believes he is still the 2012 Brownlow medallist, despite the AFL’s decision to strip him of the award in the wake of the Essendon supplements saga. Picture: Getty Images

Essendon great Jobe Watson says he is the rightful owner of the 2012 Brownlow Medal amid fresh calls for footy’s highest individual honour to be returned to him.

Opening up on the toll of the devastating supplements saga, Watson declared: “If I felt I had cheated, then I wouldn’t have accepted the medal in the first place”.

Asked whether he still feels he is the deserved winner of the 2012 medal later awarded to runners-up Trent Cotchin of Richmond and Hawthorn’s Sam Mitchell, Watson replied: “I feel like I am.”

“Whether or not someone else has it, or whether or not someone else views it that I wasn’t the deserved winner then that is fine.

“But it doesn’t change how I felt or how I feel about it.”

Jobe Watson with his 2012 Brownlow Medal, the day after the ceremony. Picture: Getty Images

It is 10 years this month since the ill-fated supplements program began that would trigger the greatest scandal in Australian sports history.

Watson’s father, club great Tim Watson, said the “injustice” of the decision to strip his son of the Brownlow because of a doping ban was “like the final crushing thing about that whole episode”.

He said he “worried” about how his 36-year-old son would cope with the aftershocks of the saga “for the rest of his life” considering Jobe became “the face” of the scandal.


“I found that (handing back the Brownlow Medal) the most difficult thing, that you could have that taken away from you without there being any … I don’t believe real justification,” Tim Watson said.

“It has been a tough journey for him and, as a parent, it has been difficult at times to observe it close hand. Injustice is a very difficult thing for people to get over.”

The record books show Sam Mitchell and Trent Cotchin are the 2012 Brownlow medallists.

Asked how he reflects on the experience, Jobe was adamant he had “forgiven” and “moved on” but said his overall emotion was “sadness”.

“It has been really challenging,” Jobe Watson said.

“I look back on it and wonder how I was able to get through it.

“It was such a drawn-out process and moved so much from one extreme to another and emotionally — it was just exhausting.”

Former Essendon chairman Paul Little, who likened the drugs saga to “a war”, said he hoped the 2012 Brownlow would eventually be returned to its rightful owner.

“I’m hopeful one day it will be reinstated,” Little said.

The AFL’s decision to strip Jobe of the 2012 Brownlow Medal does not sit well with the Watsons.

In an eight-part documentary series titled ‘The Bombers: Stories of a great club’, to be aired on Fox Footy and Kayo from October 19, former Bombers president David Evans speaks for the first time about the drugs scandal and admits mistakes were made in dealing with the saga.

“Some things in hindsight that you would have done differently, but there was no playbook for it,” Evans said.

“This was something that we were thrust into that there was no precedents.”

Evans led the fateful decision at the start of the saga that saw the Bombers “self-report” to the AFL and Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority, triggering a five-year storm.

Coach James Hird said “what happened to Jobe was horrific”.

“I don’t believe anything they took (was) illegal,” Hird said.

“I certainly don’t believe that Jobe got any unfair advantage during that year and should definitely still have his Brownlow.”

Jobe Watson, flanked by teammates when the supplements saga first emerged. Picture: Getty Images

Watson in 2013 opened up on the supplements program, saying “having that many injections was something I had not experienced in AFL football before”.

The late legendary club doctor Bruce Reid, who wrote a letter of complaint to club chiefs about the injections program, said Watson should not have been stripped of the medal.

“Jobe Watson should still have his Brownlow,” Reid said.

Essendon champion Matthew Lloyd said Watson had masked the pain.

“I’m sure that eats up at him, as much as he doesn't show it,” Lloyd said.

Former coach John Worsfold said: “He was the one, even after the suspension happened, who was still trying to be (the) strongest and hold that group together, and be that leader.

“He was probably the one we felt was the most vulnerable to the big let-down.”

Jobe Watson during his playing days at Essendon. Picture: Wayne Ludbey

After a break from the game, Watson, a two-time All-Australian and three-time best and fairest winner, has returned to football in a special comments role with Channel 7.

Essendon chief executive Xavier Campbell said the whole drugs affair was “heartbreaking” and particularly unfair on Hird, who was a “really good person”, and Watson.

“He (Watson) was put in a really difficult position. That was unfair on him, it should never have happened. And that shouldn’t, and won’t, define Jobe Watson,” Campbell said.

Campbell said the club had sought closure on the saga.

“The Essendon network didn’t fracture,” he said.

“It could have (fractured) at so many different moments.”
Cliff Notes: still a bunch of extremely delusional campaigners.
 

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SpiderBurton22

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Essendon documentary: Jobe Watson and Tim Watson on the 2012 Brownlow Medal as Bombers lift lid on supplements saga

A defiant Jobe Watson says he never should have been stripped of the 2012 Brownlow Medal in a new Essendon documentary that lifts the lid on the club’s darkest days.

Jay Clark and Michael Warner

4 min read

September 17, 2021 - 5:00AM

News Corp Australia Sports Newsroom

Jobe Watson believes he is still the 2012 Brownlow medallist, despite the AFL’s decision to strip him of the award in the wake of the Essendon supplements saga. Picture: Getty Images

Essendon great Jobe Watson says he is the rightful owner of the 2012 Brownlow Medal amid fresh calls for footy’s highest individual honour to be returned to him.

Opening up on the toll of the devastating supplements saga, Watson declared: “If I felt I had cheated, then I wouldn’t have accepted the medal in the first place”.

Asked whether he still feels he is the deserved winner of the 2012 medal later awarded to runners-up Trent Cotchin of Richmond and Hawthorn’s Sam Mitchell, Watson replied: “I feel like I am.”

“Whether or not someone else has it, or whether or not someone else views it that I wasn’t the deserved winner then that is fine.

“But it doesn’t change how I felt or how I feel about it.”

Jobe Watson with his 2012 Brownlow Medal, the day after the ceremony. Picture: Getty Images

It is 10 years this month since the ill-fated supplements program began that would trigger the greatest scandal in Australian sports history.

Watson’s father, club great Tim Watson, said the “injustice” of the decision to strip his son of the Brownlow because of a doping ban was “like the final crushing thing about that whole episode”.

He said he “worried” about how his 36-year-old son would cope with the aftershocks of the saga “for the rest of his life” considering Jobe became “the face” of the scandal.


“I found that (handing back the Brownlow Medal) the most difficult thing, that you could have that taken away from you without there being any … I don’t believe real justification,” Tim Watson said.

“It has been a tough journey for him and, as a parent, it has been difficult at times to observe it close hand. Injustice is a very difficult thing for people to get over.”

The record books show Sam Mitchell and Trent Cotchin are the 2012 Brownlow medallists.

Asked how he reflects on the experience, Jobe was adamant he had “forgiven” and “moved on” but said his overall emotion was “sadness”.

“It has been really challenging,” Jobe Watson said.

“I look back on it and wonder how I was able to get through it.

“It was such a drawn-out process and moved so much from one extreme to another and emotionally — it was just exhausting.”

Former Essendon chairman Paul Little, who likened the drugs saga to “a war”, said he hoped the 2012 Brownlow would eventually be returned to its rightful owner.

“I’m hopeful one day it will be reinstated,” Little said.

The AFL’s decision to strip Jobe of the 2012 Brownlow Medal does not sit well with the Watsons.

In an eight-part documentary series titled ‘The Bombers: Stories of a great club’, to be aired on Fox Footy and Kayo from October 19, former Bombers president David Evans speaks for the first time about the drugs scandal and admits mistakes were made in dealing with the saga.

“Some things in hindsight that you would have done differently, but there was no playbook for it,” Evans said.

“This was something that we were thrust into that there was no precedents.”

Evans led the fateful decision at the start of the saga that saw the Bombers “self-report” to the AFL and Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority, triggering a five-year storm.

Coach James Hird said “what happened to Jobe was horrific”.

“I don’t believe anything they took (was) illegal,” Hird said.

“I certainly don’t believe that Jobe got any unfair advantage during that year and should definitely still have his Brownlow.”

Jobe Watson, flanked by teammates when the supplements saga first emerged. Picture: Getty Images

Watson in 2013 opened up on the supplements program, saying “having that many injections was something I had not experienced in AFL football before”.

The late legendary club doctor Bruce Reid, who wrote a letter of complaint to club chiefs about the injections program, said Watson should not have been stripped of the medal.

“Jobe Watson should still have his Brownlow,” Reid said.

Essendon champion Matthew Lloyd said Watson had masked the pain.

“I’m sure that eats up at him, as much as he doesn't show it,” Lloyd said.

Former coach John Worsfold said: “He was the one, even after the suspension happened, who was still trying to be (the) strongest and hold that group together, and be that leader.

“He was probably the one we felt was the most vulnerable to the big let-down.”

Jobe Watson during his playing days at Essendon. Picture: Wayne Ludbey

After a break from the game, Watson, a two-time All-Australian and three-time best and fairest winner, has returned to football in a special comments role with Channel 7.

Essendon chief executive Xavier Campbell said the whole drugs affair was “heartbreaking” and particularly unfair on Hird, who was a “really good person”, and Watson.

“He (Watson) was put in a really difficult position. That was unfair on him, it should never have happened. And that shouldn’t, and won’t, define Jobe Watson,” Campbell said.

Campbell said the club had sought closure on the saga.

“The Essendon network didn’t fracture,” he said.

“It could have (fractured) at so many different moments.”
Thanks GR.

As usual these * creeps are still trying to absolve themselves of all personal responsibilities.
 

Hearts to hearts

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Essendon documentary: Jobe Watson and Tim Watson on the 2012 Brownlow Medal as Bombers lift lid on supplements saga

A defiant Jobe Watson says he never should have been stripped of the 2012 Brownlow Medal in a new Essendon documentary that lifts the lid on the club’s darkest days.

Jay Clark and Michael Warner

4 min read

September 17, 2021 - 5:00AM

News Corp Australia Sports Newsroom

Jobe Watson believes he is still the 2012 Brownlow medallist, despite the AFL’s decision to strip him of the award in the wake of the Essendon supplements saga. Picture: Getty Images

Essendon great Jobe Watson says he is the rightful owner of the 2012 Brownlow Medal amid fresh calls for footy’s highest individual honour to be returned to him.

Opening up on the toll of the devastating supplements saga, Watson declared: “If I felt I had cheated, then I wouldn’t have accepted the medal in the first place”.

Asked whether he still feels he is the deserved winner of the 2012 medal later awarded to runners-up Trent Cotchin of Richmond and Hawthorn’s Sam Mitchell, Watson replied: “I feel like I am.”

“Whether or not someone else has it, or whether or not someone else views it that I wasn’t the deserved winner then that is fine.

“But it doesn’t change how I felt or how I feel about it.”

Jobe Watson with his 2012 Brownlow Medal, the day after the ceremony. Picture: Getty Images

It is 10 years this month since the ill-fated supplements program began that would trigger the greatest scandal in Australian sports history.

Watson’s father, club great Tim Watson, said the “injustice” of the decision to strip his son of the Brownlow because of a doping ban was “like the final crushing thing about that whole episode”.

He said he “worried” about how his 36-year-old son would cope with the aftershocks of the saga “for the rest of his life” considering Jobe became “the face” of the scandal.


“I found that (handing back the Brownlow Medal) the most difficult thing, that you could have that taken away from you without there being any … I don’t believe real justification,” Tim Watson said.

“It has been a tough journey for him and, as a parent, it has been difficult at times to observe it close hand. Injustice is a very difficult thing for people to get over.”

The record books show Sam Mitchell and Trent Cotchin are the 2012 Brownlow medallists.

Asked how he reflects on the experience, Jobe was adamant he had “forgiven” and “moved on” but said his overall emotion was “sadness”.

“It has been really challenging,” Jobe Watson said.

“I look back on it and wonder how I was able to get through it.

“It was such a drawn-out process and moved so much from one extreme to another and emotionally — it was just exhausting.”

Former Essendon chairman Paul Little, who likened the drugs saga to “a war”, said he hoped the 2012 Brownlow would eventually be returned to its rightful owner.

“I’m hopeful one day it will be reinstated,” Little said.

The AFL’s decision to strip Jobe of the 2012 Brownlow Medal does not sit well with the Watsons.

In an eight-part documentary series titled ‘The Bombers: Stories of a great club’, to be aired on Fox Footy and Kayo from October 19, former Bombers president David Evans speaks for the first time about the drugs scandal and admits mistakes were made in dealing with the saga.

“Some things in hindsight that you would have done differently, but there was no playbook for it,” Evans said.

“This was something that we were thrust into that there was no precedents.”

Evans led the fateful decision at the start of the saga that saw the Bombers “self-report” to the AFL and Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority, triggering a five-year storm.

Coach James Hird said “what happened to Jobe was horrific”.

“I don’t believe anything they took (was) illegal,” Hird said.

“I certainly don’t believe that Jobe got any unfair advantage during that year and should definitely still have his Brownlow.”

Jobe Watson, flanked by teammates when the supplements saga first emerged. Picture: Getty Images

Watson in 2013 opened up on the supplements program, saying “having that many injections was something I had not experienced in AFL football before”.

The late legendary club doctor Bruce Reid, who wrote a letter of complaint to club chiefs about the injections program, said Watson should not have been stripped of the medal.

“Jobe Watson should still have his Brownlow,” Reid said.

Essendon champion Matthew Lloyd said Watson had masked the pain.

“I’m sure that eats up at him, as much as he doesn't show it,” Lloyd said.

Former coach John Worsfold said: “He was the one, even after the suspension happened, who was still trying to be (the) strongest and hold that group together, and be that leader.

“He was probably the one we felt was the most vulnerable to the big let-down.”

Jobe Watson during his playing days at Essendon. Picture: Wayne Ludbey

After a break from the game, Watson, a two-time All-Australian and three-time best and fairest winner, has returned to football in a special comments role with Channel 7.

Essendon chief executive Xavier Campbell said the whole drugs affair was “heartbreaking” and particularly unfair on Hird, who was a “really good person”, and Watson.

“He (Watson) was put in a really difficult position. That was unfair on him, it should never have happened. And that shouldn’t, and won’t, define Jobe Watson,” Campbell said.

Campbell said the club had sought closure on the saga.

“The Essendon network didn’t fracture,” he said.

“It could have (fractured) at so many different moments.”
A doco called “Essendon - stories of a great (sic) club” is certainly going to delve for the truth. WTAF. “Amid calls” for the medal to be reinstated just means five club people think he was hard done by. Mate, you led a club that done for drug cheating and now have a cushy job in footy media anyway - take it and run.
 

shinboner magic

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Essendon documentary: Jobe Watson and Tim Watson on the 2012 Brownlow Medal as Bombers lift lid on supplements saga

A defiant Jobe Watson says he never should have been stripped of the 2012 Brownlow Medal in a new Essendon documentary that lifts the lid on the club’s darkest days.

Jay Clark and Michael Warner

4 min read

September 17, 2021 - 5:00AM

News Corp Australia Sports Newsroom

Jobe Watson believes he is still the 2012 Brownlow medallist, despite the AFL’s decision to strip him of the award in the wake of the Essendon supplements saga. Picture: Getty Images

Essendon great Jobe Watson says he is the rightful owner of the 2012 Brownlow Medal amid fresh calls for footy’s highest individual honour to be returned to him.

Opening up on the toll of the devastating supplements saga, Watson declared: “If I felt I had cheated, then I wouldn’t have accepted the medal in the first place”.

Asked whether he still feels he is the deserved winner of the 2012 medal later awarded to runners-up Trent Cotchin of Richmond and Hawthorn’s Sam Mitchell, Watson replied: “I feel like I am.”

“Whether or not someone else has it, or whether or not someone else views it that I wasn’t the deserved winner then that is fine.

“But it doesn’t change how I felt or how I feel about it.”

Jobe Watson with his 2012 Brownlow Medal, the day after the ceremony. Picture: Getty Images

It is 10 years this month since the ill-fated supplements program began that would trigger the greatest scandal in Australian sports history.

Watson’s father, club great Tim Watson, said the “injustice” of the decision to strip his son of the Brownlow because of a doping ban was “like the final crushing thing about that whole episode”.

He said he “worried” about how his 36-year-old son would cope with the aftershocks of the saga “for the rest of his life” considering Jobe became “the face” of the scandal.


“I found that (handing back the Brownlow Medal) the most difficult thing, that you could have that taken away from you without there being any … I don’t believe real justification,” Tim Watson said.

“It has been a tough journey for him and, as a parent, it has been difficult at times to observe it close hand. Injustice is a very difficult thing for people to get over.”

The record books show Sam Mitchell and Trent Cotchin are the 2012 Brownlow medallists.

Asked how he reflects on the experience, Jobe was adamant he had “forgiven” and “moved on” but said his overall emotion was “sadness”.

“It has been really challenging,” Jobe Watson said.

“I look back on it and wonder how I was able to get through it.

“It was such a drawn-out process and moved so much from one extreme to another and emotionally — it was just exhausting.”

Former Essendon chairman Paul Little, who likened the drugs saga to “a war”, said he hoped the 2012 Brownlow would eventually be returned to its rightful owner.

“I’m hopeful one day it will be reinstated,” Little said.

The AFL’s decision to strip Jobe of the 2012 Brownlow Medal does not sit well with the Watsons.

In an eight-part documentary series titled ‘The Bombers: Stories of a great club’, to be aired on Fox Footy and Kayo from October 19, former Bombers president David Evans speaks for the first time about the drugs scandal and admits mistakes were made in dealing with the saga.

“Some things in hindsight that you would have done differently, but there was no playbook for it,” Evans said.

“This was something that we were thrust into that there was no precedents.”

Evans led the fateful decision at the start of the saga that saw the Bombers “self-report” to the AFL and Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority, triggering a five-year storm.

Coach James Hird said “what happened to Jobe was horrific”.

“I don’t believe anything they took (was) illegal,” Hird said.

“I certainly don’t believe that Jobe got any unfair advantage during that year and should definitely still have his Brownlow.”

Jobe Watson, flanked by teammates when the supplements saga first emerged. Picture: Getty Images

Watson in 2013 opened up on the supplements program, saying “having that many injections was something I had not experienced in AFL football before”.

The late legendary club doctor Bruce Reid, who wrote a letter of complaint to club chiefs about the injections program, said Watson should not have been stripped of the medal.

“Jobe Watson should still have his Brownlow,” Reid said.

Essendon champion Matthew Lloyd said Watson had masked the pain.

“I’m sure that eats up at him, as much as he doesn't show it,” Lloyd said.

Former coach John Worsfold said: “He was the one, even after the suspension happened, who was still trying to be (the) strongest and hold that group together, and be that leader.

“He was probably the one we felt was the most vulnerable to the big let-down.”

Jobe Watson during his playing days at Essendon. Picture: Wayne Ludbey

After a break from the game, Watson, a two-time All-Australian and three-time best and fairest winner, has returned to football in a special comments role with Channel 7.

Essendon chief executive Xavier Campbell said the whole drugs affair was “heartbreaking” and particularly unfair on Hird, who was a “really good person”, and Watson.

“He (Watson) was put in a really difficult position. That was unfair on him, it should never have happened. And that shouldn’t, and won’t, define Jobe Watson,” Campbell said.

Campbell said the club had sought closure on the saga.

“The Essendon network didn’t fracture,” he said.

“It could have (fractured) at so many different moments.”
Just when you think you haven’t had enough lols out of one story they start again.
Death by a thousand needles 😛
 

LB2Snake

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Essendon documentary: Jobe Watson and Tim Watson on the 2012 Brownlow Medal as Bombers lift lid on supplements saga

A defiant Jobe Watson says he never should have been stripped of the 2012 Brownlow Medal in a new Essendon documentary that lifts the lid on the club’s darkest days.

Jay Clark and Michael Warner

4 min read

September 17, 2021 - 5:00AM

News Corp Australia Sports Newsroom

Jobe Watson believes he is still the 2012 Brownlow medallist, despite the AFL’s decision to strip him of the award in the wake of the Essendon supplements saga. Picture: Getty Images

Essendon great Jobe Watson says he is the rightful owner of the 2012 Brownlow Medal amid fresh calls for footy’s highest individual honour to be returned to him.

Opening up on the toll of the devastating supplements saga, Watson declared: “If I felt I had cheated, then I wouldn’t have accepted the medal in the first place”.

Asked whether he still feels he is the deserved winner of the 2012 medal later awarded to runners-up Trent Cotchin of Richmond and Hawthorn’s Sam Mitchell, Watson replied: “I feel like I am.”

“Whether or not someone else has it, or whether or not someone else views it that I wasn’t the deserved winner then that is fine.

“But it doesn’t change how I felt or how I feel about it.”

Jobe Watson with his 2012 Brownlow Medal, the day after the ceremony. Picture: Getty Images

It is 10 years this month since the ill-fated supplements program began that would trigger the greatest scandal in Australian sports history.

Watson’s father, club great Tim Watson, said the “injustice” of the decision to strip his son of the Brownlow because of a doping ban was “like the final crushing thing about that whole episode”.

He said he “worried” about how his 36-year-old son would cope with the aftershocks of the saga “for the rest of his life” considering Jobe became “the face” of the scandal.


“I found that (handing back the Brownlow Medal) the most difficult thing, that you could have that taken away from you without there being any … I don’t believe real justification,” Tim Watson said.

“It has been a tough journey for him and, as a parent, it has been difficult at times to observe it close hand. Injustice is a very difficult thing for people to get over.”

The record books show Sam Mitchell and Trent Cotchin are the 2012 Brownlow medallists.

Asked how he reflects on the experience, Jobe was adamant he had “forgiven” and “moved on” but said his overall emotion was “sadness”.

“It has been really challenging,” Jobe Watson said.

“I look back on it and wonder how I was able to get through it.

“It was such a drawn-out process and moved so much from one extreme to another and emotionally — it was just exhausting.”

Former Essendon chairman Paul Little, who likened the drugs saga to “a war”, said he hoped the 2012 Brownlow would eventually be returned to its rightful owner.

“I’m hopeful one day it will be reinstated,” Little said.

The AFL’s decision to strip Jobe of the 2012 Brownlow Medal does not sit well with the Watsons.

In an eight-part documentary series titled ‘The Bombers: Stories of a great club’, to be aired on Fox Footy and Kayo from October 19, former Bombers president David Evans speaks for the first time about the drugs scandal and admits mistakes were made in dealing with the saga.

“Some things in hindsight that you would have done differently, but there was no playbook for it,” Evans said.

“This was something that we were thrust into that there was no precedents.”

Evans led the fateful decision at the start of the saga that saw the Bombers “self-report” to the AFL and Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority, triggering a five-year storm.

Coach James Hird said “what happened to Jobe was horrific”.

“I don’t believe anything they took (was) illegal,” Hird said.

“I certainly don’t believe that Jobe got any unfair advantage during that year and should definitely still have his Brownlow.”

Jobe Watson, flanked by teammates when the supplements saga first emerged. Picture: Getty Images

Watson in 2013 opened up on the supplements program, saying “having that many injections was something I had not experienced in AFL football before”.

The late legendary club doctor Bruce Reid, who wrote a letter of complaint to club chiefs about the injections program, said Watson should not have been stripped of the medal.

“Jobe Watson should still have his Brownlow,” Reid said.

Essendon champion Matthew Lloyd said Watson had masked the pain.

“I’m sure that eats up at him, as much as he doesn't show it,” Lloyd said.

Former coach John Worsfold said: “He was the one, even after the suspension happened, who was still trying to be (the) strongest and hold that group together, and be that leader.

“He was probably the one we felt was the most vulnerable to the big let-down.”

Jobe Watson during his playing days at Essendon. Picture: Wayne Ludbey

After a break from the game, Watson, a two-time All-Australian and three-time best and fairest winner, has returned to football in a special comments role with Channel 7.

Essendon chief executive Xavier Campbell said the whole drugs affair was “heartbreaking” and particularly unfair on Hird, who was a “really good person”, and Watson.

“He (Watson) was put in a really difficult position. That was unfair on him, it should never have happened. And that shouldn’t, and won’t, define Jobe Watson,” Campbell said.

Campbell said the club had sought closure on the saga.

“The Essendon network didn’t fracture,” he said.

“It could have (fractured) at so many different moments.”
Does a slab of Koolaid arrive on your doorstep if you add this to your “watch” list?
 

blackshadow

Brownlow Medallist
Sep 24, 2007
25,552
37,510
Melbourne
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
Team WADA
Essendon documentary: Jobe Watson and Tim Watson on the 2012 Brownlow Medal as Bombers lift lid on supplements saga

A defiant Jobe Watson says he never should have been stripped of the 2012 Brownlow Medal in a new Essendon documentary that lifts the lid on the club’s darkest days.

Jay Clark and Michael Warner

4 min read

September 17, 2021 - 5:00AM

News Corp Australia Sports Newsroom

Jobe Watson believes he is still the 2012 Brownlow medallist, despite the AFL’s decision to strip him of the award in the wake of the Essendon supplements saga. Picture: Getty Images

Essendon great Jobe Watson says he is the rightful owner of the 2012 Brownlow Medal amid fresh calls for footy’s highest individual honour to be returned to him.

Opening up on the toll of the devastating supplements saga, Watson declared: “If I felt I had cheated, then I wouldn’t have accepted the medal in the first place”.

Asked whether he still feels he is the deserved winner of the 2012 medal later awarded to runners-up Trent Cotchin of Richmond and Hawthorn’s Sam Mitchell, Watson replied: “I feel like I am.”

“Whether or not someone else has it, or whether or not someone else views it that I wasn’t the deserved winner then that is fine.

“But it doesn’t change how I felt or how I feel about it.”

Jobe Watson with his 2012 Brownlow Medal, the day after the ceremony. Picture: Getty Images

It is 10 years this month since the ill-fated supplements program began that would trigger the greatest scandal in Australian sports history.

Watson’s father, club great Tim Watson, said the “injustice” of the decision to strip his son of the Brownlow because of a doping ban was “like the final crushing thing about that whole episode”.

He said he “worried” about how his 36-year-old son would cope with the aftershocks of the saga “for the rest of his life” considering Jobe became “the face” of the scandal.


“I found that (handing back the Brownlow Medal) the most difficult thing, that you could have that taken away from you without there being any … I don’t believe real justification,” Tim Watson said.

“It has been a tough journey for him and, as a parent, it has been difficult at times to observe it close hand. Injustice is a very difficult thing for people to get over.”

The record books show Sam Mitchell and Trent Cotchin are the 2012 Brownlow medallists.

Asked how he reflects on the experience, Jobe was adamant he had “forgiven” and “moved on” but said his overall emotion was “sadness”.

“It has been really challenging,” Jobe Watson said.

“I look back on it and wonder how I was able to get through it.

“It was such a drawn-out process and moved so much from one extreme to another and emotionally — it was just exhausting.”

Former Essendon chairman Paul Little, who likened the drugs saga to “a war”, said he hoped the 2012 Brownlow would eventually be returned to its rightful owner.

“I’m hopeful one day it will be reinstated,” Little said.

The AFL’s decision to strip Jobe of the 2012 Brownlow Medal does not sit well with the Watsons.

In an eight-part documentary series titled ‘The Bombers: Stories of a great club’, to be aired on Fox Footy and Kayo from October 19, former Bombers president David Evans speaks for the first time about the drugs scandal and admits mistakes were made in dealing with the saga.

“Some things in hindsight that you would have done differently, but there was no playbook for it,” Evans said.

“This was something that we were thrust into that there was no precedents.”

Evans led the fateful decision at the start of the saga that saw the Bombers “self-report” to the AFL and Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority, triggering a five-year storm.

Coach James Hird said “what happened to Jobe was horrific”.

“I don’t believe anything they took (was) illegal,” Hird said.

“I certainly don’t believe that Jobe got any unfair advantage during that year and should definitely still have his Brownlow.”

Jobe Watson, flanked by teammates when the supplements saga first emerged. Picture: Getty Images

Watson in 2013 opened up on the supplements program, saying “having that many injections was something I had not experienced in AFL football before”.

The late legendary club doctor Bruce Reid, who wrote a letter of complaint to club chiefs about the injections program, said Watson should not have been stripped of the medal.

“Jobe Watson should still have his Brownlow,” Reid said.

Essendon champion Matthew Lloyd said Watson had masked the pain.

“I’m sure that eats up at him, as much as he doesn't show it,” Lloyd said.

Former coach John Worsfold said: “He was the one, even after the suspension happened, who was still trying to be (the) strongest and hold that group together, and be that leader.

“He was probably the one we felt was the most vulnerable to the big let-down.”

Jobe Watson during his playing days at Essendon. Picture: Wayne Ludbey

After a break from the game, Watson, a two-time All-Australian and three-time best and fairest winner, has returned to football in a special comments role with Channel 7.

Essendon chief executive Xavier Campbell said the whole drugs affair was “heartbreaking” and particularly unfair on Hird, who was a “really good person”, and Watson.

“He (Watson) was put in a really difficult position. That was unfair on him, it should never have happened. And that shouldn’t, and won’t, define Jobe Watson,” Campbell said.

Campbell said the club had sought closure on the saga.

“The Essendon network didn’t fracture,” he said.

“It could have (fractured) at so many different moments.”
Is this floggard's movie?
 

see see

And don't forget the joker...
May 30, 2007
10,560
37,817
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
Deportivo Wanka
This whole Jobe Brownlow thing could be cleared up quickly if they simply produce the scientific information of what was taken and the effects, that any robust legal scientific programme programme would have produced.

oh wait.. Black Ops the dog ate it
But they did. It's all a massive conspiracy to stop them being the most awesome footy club in the world.
3aa01c4d7093421d7211da879316a326.jpeg
 

KiwiRoo

Premiership Player
Mar 7, 2007
3,097
5,352
New Zealand
AFL Club
North Melbourne
But they did. It's all a massive conspiracy to stop them being the most awesome footy club in the world.
View attachment 1237815

Bill Gates sticking a microchip in your arm under the guise of a vaccine is more believable !

But seriously if you were planning something that was sailing that close to the wind, but you believed was legal, you would make sure you had all your i's dotted and T's crossed for the moment it came under scrutiny. That's just common sense.
They got away with an extremely light punishment in my view. They should thank their lucky stars they still have a football club, move on and not relitigate this, because frankly they don't have a leg to stand on.
 

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