Unsolved Taman Shud Case - The Somerton Man

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Another claimant to solving the code



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Then the claimants proof....



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NATIONAL DNA PROGRAM FOR UNIDENTIFIED AND MISSING PERSONS

In July 2020, the Australian Federal Police’s (AFP) National Missing Persons Coordination Centre (NMPCC) launched the National DNA Program for Unidentified and Missing Persons.

The aim of this multidisciplinary Program is to apply contemporary forensic techniques to current unidentified human remains (UHR) cases to assist Australian law enforcement to:

establish their identity

solve long-term missing persons cases, and

provide answers to families with missing relatives.

The success of this nationally-coordinated Program will centre on working collaboratively with police, coronial and forensic agencies across Australia to resolve these cold cases, and importantly, families of missing loved ones who are integral to a DNA-led identification effort such as this.


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Family Participation

The Australian Federal Police (AFP) is seeking expressions of interest from relatives of long-term missing persons (missing for three months or more) who are willing to participate in the National DNA Program for Unidentified and Missing Persons (National DNA Program). The National DNA Program gives families the opportunity to provide the investigating police and forensic scientists with vital information, records and samples that may assist to identify their missing loved one.
If you would like to register your interest in being involved in the National DNA Program please the below details to DNAProgram@afp.gov.au:

First Name

Last Name

Phone Number

Name of missing person

If previously reported missing:

State or Territory the person was reported missing in

Year reported missing

The National DNA Program will contact you in early 2022 with further information regarding your involvement.
In preparation, the below list outlines the types of information, records and samples of interest to the National DNA Program:
The collection of this information, and these types of records and samples, will be used by the National DNA Program to scientifically link unidentified human remains with long-term missing persons.

Reference DNA samples from multiple close biological relatives of the missing person

Personal items, biological samples or stored medical samples of the missing person from which the missing person’s DNA may be recovered (e.g. toothbrushes, razor, stored baby/wisdom teeth, lock of hair, newborn screening card, blood/biopsy sample)

Contact details of the dentist(s) and doctor(s) used by the missing person

Dental and medical records of the missing person (e.g. treatment records, specialist reports, x-rays, CT scans)

Circumstantial, biographical and physical information about the missing person (e.g. date/location last seen, clothing/shoes/jewellery last seen wearing, sex, age, ancestry, eye/hair colour, height, tattoos, birthplace)

Photographs of the missing person, including facial portraits and smiling photographs which display the teeth



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Anyone want to stump up 50 bucks USD to see what this says?


Description

In this OKCIR Research Report, hermeneutic sociologist, Khayyami scholar, and founding director of Omar Khayyam Center for Integrative Research (OKCIR), Mohammad H. Tamdgidi, Ph.D., reports having at last solved the mystery of the code associated with the so-called “Somerton Man” or “Tamám Shud” case.
The mysterious code appearing on the back page of a first edition copy of Edward FitzGerald’s The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam—found months following the death of The Somerton Man (TSM) in South Adelaide, Australia, on Dec. 1, 1948—was a suicide contemplation and planning note he was poetically drafting for himself in the form of a quatrain on the back of his copy of The Rubaiyat, giving a gist of why and how he planned to carry out a deliberately mystery-laden suicide as his last dance for a lasting life. The code was the creative DNA of his suicide plot.
It was written in the ‘Tamám Shud’ transliteration style—in this case not from Persian, but from Arabic with which he must have been familiar, either natively due to coming ancestrally from the ethnically diverse and widely multilingual Russian Caucasus and/or by training and education. In other words, the ‘Tamám Shud’ torn-out piece found in TSM’s fob pocket not only served as a bread crumb lead to his suicide note, it also offered the key to the code’s deciphering.
DNA is a self-replicating matter that reproduces the basic structure of a substance. TSM’s ‘code’ offers the DNA of his last dance performance in public hoping for a lasting life, one that was sketched amid his medical suffering. He was reflecting on his life, terminal illness, and expected imminent death, while reading the meanings conveyed about life and death in FitzGerald’s translation of Omar Khayyam’s Rubaiyat—a work of art that offered TSM a practical and proven example of how one can physically die but endure in human memory and spirit forever.
This report mainly focuses on deciphering TSM’s code, but the findings are also used to shed brief new light on one and/or another alternative wider story of what took place in Adelaide in 1948, in the years leading to it, and in the decades thereafter. The report invites readers to rethink the relevance of Omar Khayyam’s poetry to the case, and also asks a pertinent question about another fold of the mystery, that is, why did it take so long to decipher a code that could have actually been decoded much earlier?
The Somerton Man or Tamám Shud case has important lessons for us beyond the confines of the personal troubles of a man and those he knew, inviting us to use our sociological imaginations to explore such troubles in relation to the public issues that concern us all beyond the shores of Australia, and beyond the national and disciplinary walls fragmenting our lives, universities, and scientific methods in favor of transcultural and transdisciplinary modes of inquiry.
The report ends with a dancing celebration for deciphering the code as a new window to learning the true story and possible identity of the Somerton Man.

Tamám Shud: How the Somerton Man’s Last Dance for a Lasting Life Was Decoded — Omar Khayyam Center Research Report

Published by: Okcir Press (an imprint of Ahead Publishing House) • Belmont, Massachusetts • First Edition: October 1, 2021
100 pages • 6×9 inches • Includes references
Library of Congress Control Number (LCCN): 2021919688
ISBN-13: 9781640980228 (hard cover with dust jacket: alk. paper)
ISBN-13: 9781640980235 (soft cover: alk. paper)
ISBN-13: 9781640980242 (ePub ebook)
ISBN-13: 9781640980259 (PDF ebook)
CITATION: Tamdgidi, Mohammad H. 2021. Tamám Shud: How the Somerton Man’s Last Dance for a Lasting Life Was Decoded—Omar Khayyam Center Research Report. (Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge, Monograph series). Belmont, MA: Okcir Press.
LINK: https://www.okcir.com/product/tamam...s-decoded-omar-khayyam-center-research-report
Where to Purchase this Book: The various editions of this volume can be ordered from the Okcir Store and all major online bookstores worldwide (such as Amazon, Barnes&Noble, Google Play, and others).

Table of Contents

Tamám Shud: How the Somerton Man’s Last Dance for a Lasting Life Was Decoded — Omar Khayyam Center Research Report

About OKCIR—i

About the Author—ii
About this Book—iv
Preface—1
1. Introduction: The Somerton Man Case—3
2. The Code: Preliminary Observations—6
3. Preliminary Interpretive Considerations—11
4. Using Online Resources to Illustrate the Decoding—12
5. ‘Tamám Shud’ Is Also the Decoding Key—13
6. The Language Environment of the Code—17
7. Strategies for Making the Code Difficult to Decipher—20
8. Starting with the Last Main Line of the Code—23
9. The Third Main Line of the Code—29
10. The Second Main Line of the Code—38
11. The Crossed-Out Line of the Code—45
12. The First Main Line of the Code—47
13. Interpreting the Code as a Whole—50
14. The Relevance of Omar Khayyam’s ‘Rubaiyat’—58
15. The Wider Story—62
16. An Alternative and/or Additional Wider Story?—68
17. Why Did It Take So Long to Solve the Puzzle?—71
18. Conclusion: The DNA of A Last Dance for A Lasting Life—78
19. A Dancing Celebration—82
Endnotes (Reference Links)—83



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Kurve

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The skeleton mysteries: 21 cases of unidentified human remains and the hunt for answers
Their identities have been a mystery for decades, but a remarkable SA Police operation examining 21 cases of unidentified human remains is making progress.
Nigel Hunt
November 26, 2021 - 2:02PM
A police operation to formally identify 21 individuals whose remains or partial skeletons have been found across South Australia over the past 73 years is on the verge of breakthroughs in several of the cases.
Advanced forensic techniques and fresh investigations by Operation Persevere officers have resulted in successful advances in cases that have been dormant for decades.
The oldest of the 21 cases – the Somerton Man – dates back to 1948, while the most recent case was opened last month when skeletal remains were found in sand hills at Nora Creina in the state’s South-East.
Operation Persevere has used the same techniques to identify the long-term unknown remains as those to successfully determine the identities of the skeletal remains found in two recent cases – Jarrod Mueller near Port Lincoln in 2019 and Jesse Corigliano-Quealey at Maslin Beach this year.
Major Crime Investigation Branch Operations Inspector Brett Featherby said painstaking work by both Forensic Science South Australia scientists and police on the ground was paying dividends.
“Operation Persevere is progressing well and there will be results in coming months,’’ he said.
“We have reason for optimism in several other cases that have been progressing in conjunction with Forensic Science SA.’’
Investigators believe there is fresh hope in solving a 70-year-old South Australian cold case after exhumed remains of what is believed to be the Somerton man have been revealed to be in good shape.
Inspector Featherby said the individual remains or bones found, except for a newborn baby discovered in a toilet at Adelaide TAFE in 2007, were adolescents through to adults.
They had been found by members of the public who had “been out jogging, bushwalking or clearing land’’.
“The majority of such discoveries are quickly linked to a missing person, typically through dental or DNA comparisons,” Inspector Featherby said.
“People tend to focus on the DNA but dental identification is really good and is the preferred option as it delivers results quickly.
“Other features such as heart replacement components and other surgical implants are numbered, so realistically the advances in medical technology creates other ways of identification.’’
Inspector Featherby said other features such as tattoos had also proved valuable but they were only used “as a piece of the puzzle’’ and combined with other supportive evidence gathered.
“Most of the ones we are working on we are hopeful that in the future we will be able to develop a circumstantial brief of evidence for the Coroner where he will be left with an inescapable conclusion that the remains belong to a particular person,’’ he said.
In some of the 21 cases the remains have been buried, while others are stored appropriately at Forensic Science SA as investigations into their origins continue.
In each of the unidentified remains cases there are no visible signs of violence or other evidence to indicate foul play.
Of the 21 cases, 15 are male, three are female and the gender of the other three is unknown.
“Although there is nothing apparently suspicious, there are no visible signs of violence on any of the remains, the cause of death in the majority of the cases remains unknown,’’ Inspector Featherby said.
“We cannot exclude the possibility some may be a murder.’’
Operation Persevere, which is run within the Missing Persons Section, started in 2018 and has run in tandem with Operation Persist, which has been successful in solving more than a dozen unsolved cold case homicides since 2015.
Inspector Featherby said two recent cases in which human bones were found and rapidly identified indicated the success of the operation’s methods.
“Even before the latest national project started in August last year, SA Police had been proactively working to identify all unidentified remains,’’ he said.
“It has been a structured, consistent approach to the management and investigation of all long-term missing and unidentified human remains.’’
The Missing Persons Section comprises four officers who are overseen by a senior Major Crime detective. They also have access to intelligence officers within Major Crime.
Investigations in each case involve an intensive, ongoing relationship with Forensic Science South Australia, the forensic odontology unit at Adelaide University, the Coroner’s office, the National Missing Persons Coordination Centre and the National DNA and Unidentified Human Remains Project, which started last year.
All of the SA cases – including evidence such as DNA, tattoos or dental work – are uploaded on to the National Missing Persons database, which is run by the National Missing Persons Coordination Centre and the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission.
There are 145 long-term missing people in SA dating back to 1956. Of those, 111 are male and 34 are females. The youngest is aged just 11 months and the oldest is 83 years old.
There are 17 children aged 17 years or younger.
Of the total number of long-term missing persons cases, 55 of them have been declared a major crime and 42 have been lost at sea through misadventure.
The majority of those are fishermen who have fallen overboard while working.
South Australian police exhume the Somerton Man at West Terrace Cemetery. Picture: NCA NewsWire / Kelly Barnes
All missing persons case files are reviewed at intervals of one day, four days, 10 days and 30 days, after which the Missing Persons Section assumes responsibility for the investigation.
“Major Crime has oversight of each case from the outset and if it is deemed high risk it is escalated and lots of resources thrown at it straight away,’’ Operation Persevere co-ordinator Detective Senior Constable Trevor Schnieder said.
“Over time I think this has helped with the increased location rates we have seen. The process is pretty tight now.’’
Police have so far recovered a DNA profile in 72 per cent of the long-term cases and this has been uploaded on to local and national databases.
That figure is steadily increasing through an ongoing DNA back capture operation.
Forensic Science SA assistant director Anne Coxon said the examination of each case was contingent on its “individual circumstances’’, including the age of the remains, how and where they had been buried, the location and the climate.
“Depending on the remains we may be able to use odontology … it can be a lot quicker than DNA if there are dental records available,’’ Ms Coxon said.
“If DNA is required we need to take a sample and can do this from teeth or bone and that will need to be extracted. Occasionally we will attempt to extract the DNA here.
“If it is a particularly degraded DNA profile we can use the Australian Centre For Ancient DNA here in Adelaide as they have more specialised techniques for extracting DNA.’’
Once a profile is obtained, it is uploaded on to local and national databases and if there is a profile from a suspected relative it is compared with that reference sample.
Ms Coxon said each individual who worked on the cases – which included a pathologist, anthropologist, DNA specialists and other technical staff – were “passionate and dedicated’’ in the work they do.
She says they are “driven to find answers in whatever case they are working on’’ to identify the individual and help bring closure for their families.
“When a missing person or long-term missing person is identified and the identification is accepted by the Coroner, certainly being able to assist in that process is satisfying,’’ she said.
https://www.adelaidenow.com.au/.../508589feccd40edb2fedaa...
 

fortunatecrow

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Oct 17, 2015
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Anyone want to stump up 50 bucks USD to see what this says?


Description

In this OKCIR Research Report, hermeneutic sociologist, Khayyami scholar, and founding director of Omar Khayyam Center for Integrative Research (OKCIR), Mohammad H. Tamdgidi, Ph.D., reports having at last solved the mystery of the code associated with the so-called “Somerton Man” or “Tamám Shud” case.
The mysterious code appearing on the back page of a first edition copy of Edward FitzGerald’s The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam—found months following the death of The Somerton Man (TSM) in South Adelaide, Australia, on Dec. 1, 1948—was a suicide contemplation and planning note he was poetically drafting for himself in the form of a quatrain on the back of his copy of The Rubaiyat, giving a gist of why and how he planned to carry out a deliberately mystery-laden suicide as his last dance for a lasting life. The code was the creative DNA of his suicide plot.
It was written in the ‘Tamám Shud’ transliteration style—in this case not from Persian, but from Arabic with which he must have been familiar, either natively due to coming ancestrally from the ethnically diverse and widely multilingual Russian Caucasus and/or by training and education. In other words, the ‘Tamám Shud’ torn-out piece found in TSM’s fob pocket not only served as a bread crumb lead to his suicide note, it also offered the key to the code’s deciphering.
DNA is a self-replicating matter that reproduces the basic structure of a substance. TSM’s ‘code’ offers the DNA of his last dance performance in public hoping for a lasting life, one that was sketched amid his medical suffering. He was reflecting on his life, terminal illness, and expected imminent death, while reading the meanings conveyed about life and death in FitzGerald’s translation of Omar Khayyam’s Rubaiyat—a work of art that offered TSM a practical and proven example of how one can physically die but endure in human memory and spirit forever.
This report mainly focuses on deciphering TSM’s code, but the findings are also used to shed brief new light on one and/or another alternative wider story of what took place in Adelaide in 1948, in the years leading to it, and in the decades thereafter. The report invites readers to rethink the relevance of Omar Khayyam’s poetry to the case, and also asks a pertinent question about another fold of the mystery, that is, why did it take so long to decipher a code that could have actually been decoded much earlier?
The Somerton Man or Tamám Shud case has important lessons for us beyond the confines of the personal troubles of a man and those he knew, inviting us to use our sociological imaginations to explore such troubles in relation to the public issues that concern us all beyond the shores of Australia, and beyond the national and disciplinary walls fragmenting our lives, universities, and scientific methods in favor of transcultural and transdisciplinary modes of inquiry.
The report ends with a dancing celebration for deciphering the code as a new window to learning the true story and possible identity of the Somerton Man.

Tamám Shud: How the Somerton Man’s Last Dance for a Lasting Life Was Decoded — Omar Khayyam Center Research Report

Published by: Okcir Press (an imprint of Ahead Publishing House) • Belmont, Massachusetts • First Edition: October 1, 2021
100 pages • 6×9 inches • Includes references
Library of Congress Control Number (LCCN): 2021919688
ISBN-13: 9781640980228 (hard cover with dust jacket: alk. paper)
ISBN-13: 9781640980235 (soft cover: alk. paper)
ISBN-13: 9781640980242 (ePub ebook)
ISBN-13: 9781640980259 (PDF ebook)
CITATION: Tamdgidi, Mohammad H. 2021. Tamám Shud: How the Somerton Man’s Last Dance for a Lasting Life Was Decoded—Omar Khayyam Center Research Report. (Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge, Monograph series). Belmont, MA: Okcir Press.
LINK: https://www.okcir.com/product/tamam...s-decoded-omar-khayyam-center-research-report
Where to Purchase this Book: The various editions of this volume can be ordered from the Okcir Store and all major online bookstores worldwide (such as Amazon, Barnes&Noble, Google Play, and others).

Table of Contents

Tamám Shud: How the Somerton Man’s Last Dance for a Lasting Life Was Decoded — Omar Khayyam Center Research Report

About OKCIR—i

About the Author—ii
About this Book—iv
Preface—1
1. Introduction: The Somerton Man Case—3
2. The Code: Preliminary Observations—6
3. Preliminary Interpretive Considerations—11
4. Using Online Resources to Illustrate the Decoding—12
5. ‘Tamám Shud’ Is Also the Decoding Key—13
6. The Language Environment of the Code—17
7. Strategies for Making the Code Difficult to Decipher—20
8. Starting with the Last Main Line of the Code—23
9. The Third Main Line of the Code—29
10. The Second Main Line of the Code—38
11. The Crossed-Out Line of the Code—45
12. The First Main Line of the Code—47
13. Interpreting the Code as a Whole—50
14. The Relevance of Omar Khayyam’s ‘Rubaiyat’—58
15. The Wider Story—62
16. An Alternative and/or Additional Wider Story?—68
17. Why Did It Take So Long to Solve the Puzzle?—71
18. Conclusion: The DNA of A Last Dance for A Lasting Life—78
19. A Dancing Celebration—82
Endnotes (Reference Links)—83

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You would think that a media outlet could find the $50!

So while the author may have decoded the note, I reckon if it provided any information about the identify of the Somerton Man or how/why he died we would have already read about it...
 

Redacted

All Australian
Sep 16, 2019
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You would think that a media outlet could find the $50!

So while the author may have decoded the note, I reckon if it provided any information about the identify of the Somerton Man or how/why he died we would have already read about it...
That's why I'm not buying it.

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Steve The Dude

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The skeleton, which is the size of a 'child or small adult', was discovered by a passerby along the beach at Nora Creina, 341km south east of Adelaide, on Wednesday.

Picture with it was Beaumont children
Has it been confirmed by DNA match that it was one of the Beaumont children? (assuming that the Beaumont children were not legally or illegally adopted children) ... or somebody else? ....perhaps unknown?
Are you saying that there was a photo of the Beaumont children with the skeletal remains?
 

zedx

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Has it been confirmed by DNA match that it was one of the Beaumont children? (assuming that the Beaumont children were not legally or illegally adopted children) ... or somebody else? ....perhaps unknown?
Are you saying that there was a photo of the Beaumont children with the skeletal remains?
My understanding was that the news article was insinuating that the bones may belonged to a 'missing' child. The photo of the Beaumont's was used as they were mentioned in the article as missing children, the article was not specifically insinuating the bones belonged to one of them. 'Clickbait' ??
 

Steve The Dude

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My understanding was that the news article was insinuating that the bones may belonged to a 'missing' child. The photo of the Beaumont's was used as they were mentioned in the article as missing children, the article was not specifically insinuating the bones belonged to one of them. 'Clickbait' ??
Thanks for clarifying that. Now that you've explained it, I understand.
 

Kurve

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Just saying, we've been waiting for one year.

giphy (16).gif
 

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Kurve

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You would think they have had plenty of time to get a DNA result by now, IMO the DNA was not viable. So no result.

Not sure, I'd have thought with a whole body of teeth and bone to harvest they would have found something. The police were overseeing it so an expectation of some sort of update isn't expecting too much imo.
 

Redacted

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I don't think SAPol will saying anything until they have a name, and only then if the nearest nok approve the release. Otherwise we'd have to wait for the coroner to decide if there will be a further hearing I suppose.

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zedx

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I don't think SAPol will saying anything until they have a name, and only then if the nearest nok approve the release. Otherwise we'd have to wait for the coroner to decide if there will be a further hearing I suppose.

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Understandable, though you would think that they would at least give us a hint about their findings. The suspense is driving me and I'm sure others nuts!!
 

Gordon1552

Senior List
Oct 7, 2019
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Not sure, I'd have thought with a whole body of teeth and bone to harvest they would have found something. The police were overseeing it so an expectation of some sort of update isn't expecting too much imo.
A couple of issues that might be worth considering,
1. The claim was made at the time of the exhumation that they had found the identity tag which confirmed that this was the Somerton Man, how did the cardboard toe tag (if that is what it was made of) survive for 70 + years in the soil without being destroyed by microbial action?
2. The only definite proof that the remains in the grave were SMs would be the teeth. Dr. Dwyer took a dental chart at the autopsy that showed clearly that there were 18 teeth 'missing'. The teeth with jawbone would need to precisely match the dental chart and if that's not the case then it's not the man.
 
Jul 24, 2021
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A couple of issues that might be worth considering,
1. The claim was made at the time of the exhumation that they had found the identity tag which confirmed that this was the Somerton Man, how did the cardboard toe tag (if that is what it was made of) survive for 70 + years in the soil without being destroyed by microbial action?
2. The only definite proof that the remains in the grave were SMs would be the teeth. Dr. Dwyer took a dental chart at the autopsy that showed clearly that there were 18 teeth 'missing'. The teeth with jawbone would need to precisely match the dental chart and if that's not the case then it's not the man.
The toe tags used to be leather.
Also sometimes a very thin pliable metal.
 

zedx

Club Legend
Feb 23, 2019
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18 teeth missing?? He must have almost been toothless!!
How long have we been waiting to hear some sort of result? This wait is driving me nuts!! I would have thought we would have heard something by now? Maybe some one needs to contact Derek Abbott and ask what the h&$$ is going on?
 

Gordon1552

Senior List
Oct 7, 2019
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18 teeth missing?? He must have almost been toothless!!
How long have we been waiting to hear some sort of result? This wait is driving me nuts!! I would have thought we would have heard something by now? Maybe some one needs to contact Derek Abbott and ask what the h&$$ is going on?
Teeth_diagram_MKD2.gif


The chart is the one taken by Dr. Dwyer, it's very clear that the numbered teeth were missing. That includes the teeth that have previously and incorrectly been referred to as a case of anodontia,
 

squawk

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A couple of issues that might be worth considering,
1. The claim was made at the time of the exhumation that they had found the identity tag which confirmed that this was the Somerton Man, how did the cardboard toe tag (if that is what it was made of) survive for 70 + years in the soil without being destroyed by microbial action?
2. The only definite proof that the remains in the grave were SMs would be the teeth. Dr. Dwyer took a dental chart at the autopsy that showed clearly that there were 18 teeth 'missing'. The teeth with jawbone would need to precisely match the dental chart and if that's not the case then it's not the man.
I think the identity was “confirmed” by a name plate affixed to the lid of the coffin.

It’s been a long time since exhumation now, and still no public updates?
 

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