Unsolved Taman Shud Case

petedavo

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1946 - The infamous "Redheads" logo was created in 1946

The infamous “Redheads” logo was created in 1946 and first used on matchbox packaging in 1947. She then proceeded to carve out a place for herself at the forefront of Australian match awareness. The logo has become affectionately known as “Miss Redhead” and is instantly recognised by the majority of Australians.

The name Redheads was derived from the red striking head of the “Safety Match” and was introduced to Australia when Bryant & May started manufacturing matches.

These new red “Safety Matches” were much welcomed as they presented fewer health risks than earlier matches and greatly minimizes the risk of accidental fires.

The earlier “Strike Anywhere” matches were made with poisonous white phosphorous. Sensitive to friction as the name suggests, it could be struck on almost any surface.

The Safety Matches could only ignite if struck on the prepared surface made of non-poisonous “red” or “amorphos” phosphorous that was painted on the side of the matchbox

Pictures of 1947 Redheads match box is on https://blogs.slv.vic.gov.au/our-stories/evolution-of-a-fiery-redhead/ but it's copyrighted

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Mycroft

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Thanks. Do you have any further information about Reynolds?

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I'm simply letting you know as an update of sorts, that new DNA samples were taken 15 months ago, and S.A.POL and FSSA (Forensic Science S.A.) should have a result by now, but keeping quiet. A viable DNA sample will give information (family names) to follow up and compare to a possible SM identity found during research. As it's not my research, it's not my place to offer a name, and I'd rather see it matched the DNA results and be certain anyway.
 
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petedavo

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This bloke is making some assumptions about the nature of Jessica's relationship to SM, which I don't think is supported by evidence, but he has a crack at the "code".


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peteb

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Leane gets a job where Hollis and Hemblys-Scales were the recruiters

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This bloke is making some assumptions about the nature of Jessica's relationship to SM, which I don't think is supported by evidence, but he has a crack at the "code".


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732752


This is Gordon Cramer's work - the code letter Q is more than it appears to be ...
 

BlueE

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I'm simply letting you know as an update of sorts, that new DNA samples were taken 15 months ago, and S.A.POL and FSSA (Forensic Science S.A.) should have a result by now, but keeping quiet. A viable DNA sample will give information (family names) to follow up and compare to a possible SM identity found during research. As it's not my research, it's not my place to offer a name, and I'd rather see it matched the DNA results and be certain anyway.
I think these articles about DNA results, one from SM's potential grand daughter Rachel Egan and the other from strands of SM's hair left on the plaster when making the bust.

732785


At ACAD, researchers extract DNA from animals, people, plants and soil to piece together histories and lineages and explain ancient phenomena, such as extinction events and human migrations. Sometimes, it gets involved with criminal cases, such as that of Daniel Morcombe, a 13-year-old boy abducted and murdered in 2003. Scientists at ACAD played a critical role in identifying remains found in 2011 and linking them to the boy.

Four years ago, ACAD isolated several hairs from the Somerton Man's plaster cast, but its effort stopped there. "Other projects with a budget take priority," Abbott explains.

It's not as simple as just pulling any hair they can find. The team is looking for a particular type of hair in "anagen phase." During life, this type of hair is rich with DNA. Locating a hair that was in this phase at death gives the team the best chance at obtaining a DNA profile.

A DNA profile is like a book made up of billions of sentences featuring just four letters: A, T, C and G. If The letters always occur in pairs: C connects with G, A connects with T. The arrangement of these letters define who you are, what you look like, what your eye color is and how your body functions. It's unique to you.

When cells divide, they need to make copies of themselves, and sometimes this results in errors. Think of them as typos -- where there was once a C, there is now a G. These are known as "single-nucleotide polymorphisms," or SNPs, and over time, as our cells divide, we accumulate more of them.

If viable DNA can be extracted from the Somerton Man, these errors will give us a better understanding of who he was. Police used this technique, along with an online database of DNA profiles, to crack the Golden State Killer case in April and locate the man they believe to be responsible for a spate of murders and rapes dating back to 1974.

So far, ACAD has shown there's viable DNA from the hairs caught in the plaster cast. But the team needs to sequence around 600,000 SNPs to have a decent chance at nailing down the man's identity -- and that process takes time.

Time they may not have.


... Mysteries like that compelled journalist Aimee Knight to report on the state's sordid history and to eventually seek out Renée Blackie, a forensic scientist from South Australia's Flinders University.

"I've always been in awe of her work," Knight says. "My skills as a writer and critic, plus Renée's extensive work with DNA, have given us a unique view on the case and its narrative."

Together, the pair visited the Somerton Man's plaster cast at the South Australian Police Museum. Inspecting it, Blackie floated the idea that it was theoretically possible to extract DNA from the bust and have it analyzed via a technique that she pioneered while researching her doctorate.

In early June, she swabbed the bust and plucked a single hair from the plaster, like Abbott's team did. The difference is in how that hair will be used to build a DNA profile.

Those samples were transferred to the state forensic laboratory (FSSA), which builds DNA profiles from samples collected from crime scenes. The team typically looks at a set of 23 to 24 locations on the DNA, says Damien Abarno, DNA database program manager at FSSA.

"What we're measuring in those locations is the number of repeats you have in your DNA," he says. These sections of DNA are known as short tandem repeats (STRs).

Measuring STRs enables the laboratory to build a unique DNA profile of an individual from a sample -- such as a hair. The profile built is then matched to one in the database to identify an individual.

In theory, the process could be used to identify the Somerton Man. He won't have a DNA profile in the NCIDD, Australia's National Criminal Investigation DNA Database, but his profile might just match those of relatives in the database, providing new leads.

There are drawbacks, though. Abarno concedes the analysis at FSSA isn't as comprehensive as the method favored by ACAD, which can look at "a lot more places on the DNA." Looking at more places allows Abbott and ACAD to "interrogate the relationships" further than FSSA, and potentially match more-distant relatives.

"It is doubtful [FSSA] will get a DNA result in the first place, as their techniques are unproven on 70-year-old degraded DNA," he says.

Dennis McNevin, professor of forensic genetics at University of Technology Sydney, agrees there are difficulties building a DNA profile using STRs, specifically in cases where the DNA has degraded.

"It's not an issue for most forensic processes. Even if I touch my desk, there's enough DNA there to generate an STR profile. The problem is when you have compromised or degraded remains," says McNevin.
 

BlueE

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Three types of DNA can be tested: mtDNA (inherited maternally), YDNA (inherited paternally), and autosomal DNA (inherited from both sides).

"Autosomal DNA is what's needed, and that's how adopted kids can find their biological parents, by a blind search," Abbott said. "It is inherited from both sides of the family, and when you put it in a genealogical database, you can get matches with recent relatives going up to about fifth cousin. By finding your web of cousins, you can triangulate their family trees and work out your unknown parents."

But the catch with autosomal DNA is that the concentration levels per human cell are much lower than the levels of mtDNA and YDNA. When dealing with human hair that is more than 60 years old, sufficient DNA extraction is a very difficult problem.

In the meantime, the University of Adelaide researchers have run one simple mtDNA test as a first step. The group of Associate Professor Jeremy Austin, at the university's Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD), found that the Somerton Man's mother belongs to the DNA haplogroup H. About 40% of Europeans belong to this group, so it's not particularly surprising, given the Somerton Man clearly appears Caucasian.

More importantly, however, this successful DNA test shows that viable DNA is still present that has not been contaminated by the formaldehyde embalming fluid. This evidence is one of the requirements needed for petitioning for an exhumation.


...
Although Robin passed away of prostate cancer in 2009 and was cremated, the University of Adelaide researchers have found a way around this obstacle with modern forensics techniques. The researchers explain that, by essentially subtracting the DNA data of Robin's spouse from the DNA data of his living descendant, they can reconstruct Robin's autosomal DNA profile, producing what is called "phased" DNA data.

The results suggest that Robin had ancestral ties to the US along his paternal line. Several of Robin's distant cousins currently live in the US, with the closest matches having roots in the Virginia area. The results show that Robin even had a cousin who is a direct descendent of Isham Randolph, who was Thomas Jefferson's grandfather.

Moreover, using data from the Eurogenes K13 Project, the researchers found that Robin inherited DNA from his father that contains a small fraction of American Indian DNA. Taken together with the fact that the Somerton Man was wearing a jacket and tie of US origin, the evidence makes a compelling case that the Somerton Man was an American. ...


Isotope testing

The 60-year-old strands of hair may hold other secrets besides those contained in the DNA—specifically, information about the isotopes of the elements in his system, which may provide clues about the Somerton Man's lifestyle.

Uncovering the isotope information involves first burning a 1-cm length of hair with an excimer laser beam and then analyzing the isotopes in the burned hair using a technique called laser ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), which was carried out by Dr. James Chappell at the University of Adelaide. Preliminary results show that the Somerton Man had higher-than-normal levels of arsenic, lead, and strontium-88 in his system. The high arsenic level is not surprising since environmental arsenic levels in industrialized societies were higher in the 1940s than they are today. Although the man's lead content was enormous about a month before his death, it decayed as time went on, so it does not appear that lead was what killed him. As Abbott explained, the strontium-88 level is perhaps the most intriguing.

"The strontium-88 is very interesting, as there is a very sharp change about one-and-a-half weeks before death," he said.

732790


 

BlueE

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I'm hopeful that the science will resolve SM's identity soon. I brought forward the Reynolds 1918 seaman's I.D. (in mid-2010) for examination by Adelaide University comparative expert Maciej Henneberg. I can tell you that my father (Max McIntyre) certainly believed the I.D. belonged to the deceased man found on Somerton beach in 1948, hence my seeking out confirmation via the University. That was 9 years ago. Police were informed at the time, and my father was eventually interviewed. Then early last year I was contacted by Renee Blackie from Flinder's University Forensics DNA Laboratory. Ms. Blackie had been doing her own investigations into SM, and she'd done some follow up on the I.D. card's origins. Going back to 2010 when the I.D. was first examined, we didn't know whether the person named on the I.D. card was the same man as shown in the photo, and it's the photo that gave the positive comparative match to SM. So in early 2018 Ms. Blackie and her colleague visited me a few times and they shared their findings. The forensic interest in SM, was whether a DNA sample that old, likely somewhat degraded, could be taken from SM's plaster cast and still give good results via their new DNA testing techniques. First, permission was sought from Adelaide Major Crime to access SM's bust. Samples were successfully gathered by Ms. Blackie in May 2018. She'd hoped to have a result within a few weeks, however Major Crime chose instead, that SM's samples would go to the Forensic Science S.A. facility, sighting 'chain of evidence' rules. That was 15 months ago, and no-one's heard anything since.
I think this is explained in the Wiki entry for Tamam Shud which describes and Adelaide woman contacting Henneberg with an ID of RC Reynolds.


The card, a document issued in the United States to foreign seamen during World War I, was given to Henneberg in October 2011 for comparison of the ID photograph to that of the Somerton man. While Henneberg found anatomical similarities in features such as the nose, lips and eyes, he believed they were not as reliable as the close similarity of the ear. The ear shapes shared by both men were a "very good" match, although Henneberg also found what he called a "unique identifier;" a mole on the cheek that was the same shape and in the same position in both photographs."Together with the similarity of the ear characteristics, this mole, in a forensic case, would allow me to make a rare statement positively identifying the Somerton man."[80]

The ID card, numbered 58757, was issued in the United States on 28 February 1918 to H.C. Reynolds, giving his nationality as "British" and age as 18. Searches conducted by the US National Archives, the UK National Archives and the Australian War Memorial Research Centre have failed to find any records relating to H.C. Reynolds. The South Australia Police Major Crime Branch, who still have the case listed as open, will investigate the new information.[80][needs update] Some independent researchers believe the ID card belonged to one Horace Charles Reynolds, a Tasmanian man who died in 1953 and therefore could not have been the Somerton Man.[81][self-published source?]
[82]

While I think the ID looks similar to the photograph put out for the SM could it have been a fake produced for the police by your father?

SM's hair was gingery blonde and both the police photo and the Reynolds ID had brown or dark brow hair.
 

petedavo

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View attachment 732796View attachment 732798Is this an Australian version of Bryant and May Smatches? (Safety Matches)A map of Australia in the middle or a crown?

Still can't make out what's written at the top of box?
No. It's from the Federal Match Company in NSW. Bryant and May had a factory in Victoria. I'd note that each state had their own match companies, so there was about six Australian brands available plus hundreds of imported brands. Bryant and May would've been what we call today, a multinational business based in the UK with subsidiaries in Australia. I note the the redheads trademark was licensed to WA Match as well. The matches from the Australian Bryant and May factory shortened the company name to Brymay or something like that. I note that they imported matches from their Swedish factory to make up for supply problems.

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Three types of DNA can be tested: mtDNA (inherited maternally), YDNA (inherited paternally), and autosomal DNA (inherited from both sides).

"Autosomal DNA is what's needed, and that's how adopted kids can find their biological parents, by a blind search," Abbott said. "It is inherited from both sides of the family, and when you put it in a genealogical database, you can get matches with recent relatives going up to about fifth cousin. By finding your web of cousins, you can triangulate their family trees and work out your unknown parents."

But the catch with autosomal DNA is that the concentration levels per human cell are much lower than the levels of mtDNA and YDNA. When dealing with human hair that is more than 60 years old, sufficient DNA extraction is a very difficult problem.

In the meantime, the University of Adelaide researchers have run one simple mtDNA test as a first step. The group of Associate Professor Jeremy Austin, at the university's Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD), found that the Somerton Man's mother belongs to the DNA haplogroup H. About 40% of Europeans belong to this group, so it's not particularly surprising, given the Somerton Man clearly appears Caucasian.

More importantly, however, this successful DNA test shows that viable DNA is still present that has not been contaminated by the formaldehyde embalming fluid. This evidence is one of the requirements needed for petitioning for an exhumation.


...
Although Robin passed away of prostate cancer in 2009 and was cremated, the University of Adelaide researchers have found a way around this obstacle with modern forensics techniques. The researchers explain that, by essentially subtracting the DNA data of Robin's spouse from the DNA data of his living descendant, they can reconstruct Robin's autosomal DNA profile, producing what is called "phased" DNA data.

The results suggest that Robin had ancestral ties to the US along his paternal line. Several of Robin's distant cousins currently live in the US, with the closest matches having roots in the Virginia area. The results show that Robin even had a cousin who is a direct descendent of Isham Randolph, who was Thomas Jefferson's grandfather.

Moreover, using data from the Eurogenes K13 Project, the researchers found that Robin inherited DNA from his father that contains a small fraction of American Indian DNA. Taken together with the fact that the Somerton Man was wearing a jacket and tie of US origin, the evidence makes a compelling case that the Somerton Man was an American. ...


Isotope testing

The 60-year-old strands of hair may hold other secrets besides those contained in the DNA—specifically, information about the isotopes of the elements in his system, which may provide clues about the Somerton Man's lifestyle.

Uncovering the isotope information involves first burning a 1-cm length of hair with an excimer laser beam and then analyzing the isotopes in the burned hair using a technique called laser ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), which was carried out by Dr. James Chappell at the University of Adelaide. Preliminary results show that the Somerton Man had higher-than-normal levels of arsenic, lead, and strontium-88 in his system. The high arsenic level is not surprising since environmental arsenic levels in industrialized societies were higher in the 1940s than they are today. Although the man's lead content was enormous about a month before his death, it decayed as time went on, so it does not appear that lead was what killed him. As Abbott explained, the strontium-88 level is perhaps the most intriguing.

"The strontium-88 is very interesting, as there is a very sharp change about one-and-a-half weeks before death," he said.

View attachment 732790

The blue part is incorrect. Autosomal DNA is far more abundant in a cell than MtDNA and YDNA.
 

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Mycroft

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I think this is explained in the Wiki entry for Tamam Shud which describes and Adelaide woman contacting Henneberg with an ID of RC Reynolds.


The card, a document issued in the United States to foreign seamen during World War I, was given to Henneberg in October 2011 for comparison of the ID photograph to that of the Somerton man. While Henneberg found anatomical similarities in features such as the nose, lips and eyes, he believed they were not as reliable as the close similarity of the ear. The ear shapes shared by both men were a "very good" match, although Henneberg also found what he called a "unique identifier;" a mole on the cheek that was the same shape and in the same position in both photographs."Together with the similarity of the ear characteristics, this mole, in a forensic case, would allow me to make a rare statement positively identifying the Somerton man."[80]

The ID card, numbered 58757, was issued in the United States on 28 February 1918 to H.C. Reynolds, giving his nationality as "British" and age as 18. Searches conducted by the US National Archives, the UK National Archives and the Australian War Memorial Research Centre have failed to find any records relating to H.C. Reynolds. The South Australia Police Major Crime Branch, who still have the case listed as open, will investigate the new information.[80][needs update] Some independent researchers believe the ID card belonged to one Horace Charles Reynolds, a Tasmanian man who died in 1953 and therefore could not have been the Somerton Man.[81][self-published source?]
[82]

While I think the ID looks similar to the photograph put out for the SM could it have been a fake produced for the police by your father?

SM's hair was gingery blonde and both the police photo and the Reynolds ID had brown or dark brow hair.
I saw this I.D. for the first time when my father took it out from under floor boards, and that was in the 60's in our family home. I took possession of the I.D. at around age 12 not knowing it's significance, and although my father personalised his relationship with this man, I had no idea what or who he was talking about at the time, or whether he was bragging, fantasising or telling me the truth. That's why I sought out Mr. Hennebergs expertise for confirmation. I really don't understand your line of thought re-'the photograph put out for the SM', but if you're doubting the authenticity of the deceased morgue photo, you'll need to take it up with S.A.POL. Mr. Henneberg was given access to SM's plaster cast in 2010, thus not simply reliant on that morgue shot... black and white I think, as is the I.D. photo. He's also 30 years younger. An eye witness description details further, the hair contains some ginger and grey etc.. I've not come here to debate theories etc., and I'm happy to I'll leave it with the experts and the science.
 

BlueE

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I saw this I.D. for the first time when my father took it out from under floor boards, and that was in the 60's in our family home. I took possession of the I.D. at around age 12 not knowing it's significance, and although my father personalised his relationship with this man, I had no idea what or who he was talking about at the time, or whether he was bragging, fantasising or telling me the truth. That's why I sought out Mr. Hennebergs expertise for confirmation. I really don't understand your line of thought re-'the photograph put out for the SM', but if you're doubting the authenticity of the deceased morgue photo, you'll need to take it up with S.A.POL. Mr. Henneberg was given access to SM's plaster cast in 2010, thus not simply reliant on that morgue shot... black and white I think, as is the I.D. photo. He's also 30 years younger. An eye witness description details further, the hair contains some ginger and grey etc.. I've not come here to debate theories etc., and I'm happy to I'll leave it with the experts and the science.
I'm very interested in what he told you about the man?
 

petedavo

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Isotope testing

The 60-year-old strands of hair may hold other secrets besides those contained in the DNA—specifically, information about the isotopes of the elements in his system, which may provide clues about the Somerton Man's lifestyle.

Uncovering the isotope information involves first burning a 1-cm length of hair with an excimer laser beam and then analyzing the isotopes in the burned hair using a technique called laser ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), which was carried out by Dr. James Chappell at the University of Adelaide. Preliminary results show that the Somerton Man had higher-than-normal levels of arsenic, lead, and strontium-88 in his system. The high arsenic level is not surprising since environmental arsenic levels in industrialized societies were higher in the 1940s than they are today. Although the man's lead content was enormous about a month before his death, it decayed as time went on, so it does not appear that lead was what killed him. As Abbott explained, the strontium-88 level is perhaps the most intriguing.

"The strontium-88 is very interesting, as there is a very sharp change about one-and-a-half weeks before death," he said.

View attachment 732790

There was a clandestine collection of pathology sample of human bones and thyroids undertaken by the ARL as part of a covert project sunshine by the US to measure strontium radioisotopes in bones and thyroids to discover secret Russian nuclear accidents & weapons tests started in the late 1940's. In later years it was revealed due to the payments made to people to harvest the bone and tissue samples from cadavers without the consent of families of the deceased. Apparently there was something in the media about someone at the University of Adelaide and the secret money for harvesting bone samples from the dead without consent.
There is a very strong possibility that samples from Somerton Man may of been harvested in this clandestine project.
When I was researching evidence of radioactive contamination in Australia for the covert Israeli nuclear test in the Indian Ocean, I came across this

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petedavo

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There was a clandestine collection of pathology sample of human bones and thyroids undertaken by the ARL as part of a covert project sunshine by the US to measure strontium radioisotopes in bones and thyroids to discover secret Russian nuclear accidents & weapons tests started in the late 1940's. In later years it was revealed due to the payments made to people to harvest the bone and tissue samples from cadavers without the consent of families of the deceased. Apparently there was something in the media about someone at the University of Adelaide and the secret money for harvesting bone samples from the dead without consent.
There is a very strong possibility that samples from Somerton Man may of been harvested in this clandestine project.
When I was researching evidence of radioactive contamination in Australia for the covert Israeli nuclear test in the Indian Ocean, I came across this

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I just reviewed the official report. Apparently the clandestine harvesting of human tissue sampling didn't officially begin until 1957
It was officially wound up in 1973, presumably because new technologies for the detection of nuclear events, like the Vela satellite system, had become available and were much more effective and timely.

View attachment sr90pubrep[1] (1).pdf


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petedavo

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Not queer at all, it's called steganography ... and it was widely used to transmit messages ...
Yes, I know about steganography. It's the message that is queer. I'm inclined to think that it means nothing, and is just someone practising steganography, much like a boy scout might practice recreating the secret messages that Baden Powell hid in his drawings of butterflies in Southern Africa of Boer encampments and strongholds, which is an earlier form of steganography.

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petedavo

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I just reviewed the official report. Apparently the clandestine harvesting of human tissue sampling didn't officially begin until 1957
It was officially wound up in 1973, presumably because new technologies for the detection of nuclear events, like the Vela satellite system, had become available and were much more effective and timely.

View attachment 733280


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I assume that the Soviets had a similar clandestine collection program, as it would of been in their interests to know the yields of Weapons tested by the US and Britain. And also in their interests to know the range and payload capacities of missiles and other delivery systems for nuclear weapons being tested by the US and Britain.
Particular interest in the Blue Streak missile testing and the nuclear weapons testing in Australia by Britain would've been extremely sought after by Soviet intelligence IMO
The Soviets would've needed to know how far western weapons could reach into Soviet territory and the likely destructive power, so that they could prepare effective counter measures and where to place their strategic assets out of potential harms way. Remember Somerton Man's death occurred in the late 1940's and mutually assured destruction wasn't yet a possibility nor envisioned. The level of Strontium in his body makes me wonder if he was somewhere near any of the US weapons tests. Maybe to collect air and soil samples for someone or part of the service personnel at the Marshall Islands or the occupation forces in Japan for instance?

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peteb

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Yes, I know about steganography. It's the message that is queer. I'm inclined to think that it means nothing, and is just someone practising steganography, much like a boy scout might practice recreating the secret messages that Baden Powell hid in his drawings of butterflies in Southern Africa of Boer encampments and strongholds, which is an earlier form of steganography.

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The message is supposed to look queer ...

like this one

733400


All you need is the key.
 

peteb

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The Queer message might be the key.
The masking book might be the Rubyiat itself.


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This was the key Leo Marks used

The life that I have
Is all that I have
And the life that I have
Is yours.
The love that I have
Of the life that I have
Is yours and yours and yours.
A sleep I shall have
A rest I shall have
Yet death will be but a pause.
For the peace of my years
In the long green grass
Will be yours and yours and yours.
 

petedavo

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This was the key Leo Marks used

The life that I have
Is all that I have
And the life that I have
Is yours.
The love that I have
Of the life that I have
Is yours and yours and yours.
A sleep I shall have
A rest I shall have
Yet death will be but a pause.
For the peace of my years
In the long green grass
Will be yours and yours and yours.
Just about everything that I could come up with has been done already I note

It could just as easily be a doodle.
First letters of each town his train stopped at or passed through, or acronyms eg: in my work ML = Military Leave
ABO could be Authorised by Office or O could be a name, or it could be an acronym for a place.
Goa intrigues me. Goa is a former Portuguese colony in India. Goa would've been a good spot to spy upon British interests during the war. A Portuguese speaker would go unnoticed. Brazil and Mozambique are also Portuguese speaking. Argentina is Spanish but Spanish and Portuguese is similar. It would be possible for an Argentinian to be fluent in Portuguese. There were a lot of Nazi sympathisers in Argentina. Hemblys-Scales and his wife had Argentinean and Brazilian connections. Indeed Hemblys-Scales retired to Brazil and then moved to Argentina. Maybe the code isn't in English?
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Mycroft

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I just reviewed the official report. Apparently the clandestine harvesting of human tissue sampling didn't officially begin until 1957
It was officially wound up in 1973, presumably because new technologies for the detection of nuclear events, like the Vela satellite system, had become available and were much more effective and timely.

View attachment 733280


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I read of the appalling treatment towards those affected by the fallout in author Frank Walker's book, "Maralinga"...Men used as guinea pigs and studied while they slowly died, and Doctors signed binding Govt. agreements to ensure they'd never tell. It seemed everyone was in on it. Our leaders knew and complicit. In one instance, a mother, grieving her child's death, was stopped from dressing the body for burial, then made to feel 'crazy' for asking. They didn't want the mother to see they'd harvested the child's legs to acquire the bones for testing (without consent). If nothing else SM's legacy might be, that it has people delving into records and examining past cover-ups.
 

petedavo

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AFL Club
West Coast
I've had a go at the top half, but I don't think it's much good. I'm not sure if it's even in english, but I think that it's not a code, but a bunch of acronyms or short hand, and just went from there. Maybe it'll help someone else to discern what these doodles are about


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